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In this answer, I'm going to use "self" to describe the person who is empathizing and "other" as the person who is the target of that empathy (the person who's trying to be related to). The most advance model of empathy (in terms of affective empathy and emotional contagion) that I know of is Angelica Lim's model which is based on the idea that mirror ...


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If that suffices, I can give you the classical article from the domain of language learning: Gold 1967. The basic intuition is that an infinite number of grammars could explain any given set of strings. Analogously, you can probably consider fitting a polynomial to a set of points, or instances of the inverse problem (reconstructing a source from ...


4

I myself have not come across a complete end-to-end hippocampal model, but I would imagine that such an implementation would be quite broad in scope. Edmund Rolls has some nice papers on the hippocampus, one of which is a particularly informative and recent review: Kesner RP, and Rolls ET. A computational theory of hippocampal function, and tests of the ...


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This is the paper you would want to read on this topic. The paper empirically compares four modes of managing interruptions. It is a great (and long) read so I'll try to summarize the bit for you: There are thus four modes of managing interruptions: Immediate interruptions. There is no management whatsoever. As soon there is a distracting stimulus/task, ...


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Overall, based on my limited research it appears there is no evidence that people who are more logical are more likely to experience depression. There is a theory that people who see the world more accurately (of which rationality would be a component) are more likely to become depressed. It is called depressive realism {1}. However, the theory doesn't seem ...


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You should consider using subject-specific alpha channels and frequency ranges. There are differences between individuals in alpha peak frequency. Also the placement of the EEG cap as well as small differences in orientations of cortex can affect which channels pick up perceptual activity. One way to do this would be to record data from the subject with ...


3

How to integrate realistic cognitive models of human behaviour and ecomonic models is an open research question, however to tackle it, it might be helpful to break it into a few more easily answerable sub-questions: What models of human planning with emotional influence exist? There are a number of models in existence that try to capture emotion and ...


3

It is generally understood that girls develop a small to moderate deficit in math abilities, compared to boys, over the course of schooling, as measured by mean school grades or test scores (Hyde & Linn, 2006 give a number of .08 standard deviations in favor of men for mathematical problem solving on average, a larger effect favoring elementary school ...


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There are a few commercial packages that provide training for verbal and visuo-spaital working memory. The most well-known is CogMed (http://www.cogmed.com). Another popular one is Jungle Memory (http://junglememory.com). Both of these packages have been used in research studies (comment about these results below) There is also a myriad of online working ...


3

Dynamical systems models is commonly used in the domain of perception and action. See Warren, 2006 for a comprehensive review. This work uses the mathematical formalism of dynamics and not just the metaphorical concepts. An exploration of the references of Warren's paper, as well as of papers that have cited it, will find many examples of dynamical models of ...


3

As noted above, evolutionary theories suggest that (heterosexual) females should be more choosy than males, because they typically invest far more resources in raising offspring (men have enough time and sperm that their genes are going to be more successful if they adopt a scattergun approach!). A disclaimer here is that, in humans, research on sex ...


3

This is not quite your question, but it's the closest thing I know of. There's a significant amount of work suggesting that purely morphological attributes can shape conceptualization: looking at the impact of grammatical gender on the attributes assigned to the nouns that have a specific grammatical gender--that is, grammatically male nouns are rated ...


2

I wanted to make a few additions to Christiaan's answer. First of all, the functional location's as described by Brodmann (wiki) is a little outdated. Nowadays, it is believed that there are networks of regions that are responsible for a particular function. An example is the default mode network, a network of the ACC and prefrontal regions, that is ...


2

...studies that show that every part of the cortex does essentially the same thing! I would be much interested in seeing these studies - Although the brain is plastic and inter-individual differences can be substantial, it is generally accepted that functional regions are well defined in terms of their anatomical locations and brain mapping was, and still ...


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I've looked through that book briefly but never really got into it... if I could suggest some others, though: Dayan and Abbott's Theoretical Neuroscience is a standard text in computational neuroscience but if I understand your question correctly, you might enjoy Kevin Murphy's Machine Learning: A Probabilistic Perspective, or David MacKay's Information ...


2

Yes, addition becomes procedural knowledge. Below is an extract from the book "Smart Thinking by Art Markman", that clearly explains the process : When you are learning to do addition, the two procedures you have for adding compete with each other. One of those procedures requires some effort. You start with the bigger number and then count up. ...


2

After some significant searching myself I don't believe that what you've stated was one of the many criticisms of "The Bell Curve". It wouldn't be impossible for the review you read to go something like, "Murray's, "The Bell Curve" is akin to other racially biased research like as XYZ's "IQ Research", in which XYZ claimed that African students had, on ...


2

I love this kind of research because it shows how there's an affective undercurrent to essentially every part of our lives. This is formalized in microvalence theory (Lebrecht et al., 2012), which posits that all objects, even ordinary ones, are imbued with valence (e.g., explaining why you prefer one chair over another). As far as positive geometric ...


2

We don't have a well tested or accepted model of how specific items are encoded in the cortex, so text to brain is still far off. However, it is possible to send information to the brain. Ramirez et al. 2013. Creating a False Memory in the Hippocampus This study (in mice) involved creating a false sense of fear associated with a particular context. This ...


2

First some linguistic theory background. Noam Chomsky has hypothesized that language developed internally to facilitate certain aspects of human cognition. According to Chomsky's hypothesis, human ability to articulate language audibly for communication appeared much later. Chomsky claims that the rather sudden emergence of language as communication points ...


1

Both Carol Dweck and Angela Duckworth have fairly brief tests meant to measure student success and by some extension grades. Dweck's work focuses on how having a "fixed mindset" limits a students ability to grow in a subject and is used to explain why students are so apt to give up when met with challenge. Her quiz would have to be formatted for pen and ...


1

pretty simple: through direct electromagnetic stimulation of photoreceptors in the retina in patterns corresponding to letter shapes, transduced through layers of processing there, passed through the optic nerve to the lgn of the thalamus and from there to visual cortex, eventually you get a complete neural representation of the text. alternatively, you ...


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In recent news, Lumosity has paid a $2 million fine to the FTC for unsubstantiated claims about the benefits of its training. I've heard CogMed recommended by practicing neuro rehab professionals. Apparently, there is science to back its claims. It gets a bit pricey, however.


1

My answer is going to be super skewed, I think, toward my interests. Nonetheless, I'd consider these papers "revolutionary," and I think their legacy will be long-lasting and their impact expansive (across all domains of psychology). Are emotions natural kinds? (Barrett, 2006). This paper upends many decades of thinking about what emotions are and has ...


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Chomsky's review of Skinner's book Verbal Behavior. This review helped kick off both modern linguistics and the cognitive revolution. Marr and Poggio (1976). Here is where Marr's famous levels of analysis of information processing systems are detailed. These levels provide a framework for organizing all of cognitive science research, in my and many others' ...


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Ok, I will start. I don't necessarily know if these are definitely the best three books I have read, but they are three of the best. If I think of better ones then I will add them. Thinking, Fast and Slow Predictably Irrational Influence: Science and practice My interest in cognitive science is about i) understanding my own irrationality and ii) ...


1

ACT-R is a complete cognitive model that incorporates Working Memory, Declarative Memory and Procedural Memory, but also incorporates input (visual and auditory) and output (manual) buffers. It is a really interesting model about the human in its entirety but, it is at a high level of abstraction. The paper about memory you want is "REFLECTIONS OF THE ...


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Ok I finally found the official demographic norming data from the WAIS-IV on page 104 of this book: "WAIS-IV Clinical Use and Interpretation: Scientist-Practitioner Perspectives" You can see a preview of this book at http://tinyurl.com/z3vr44e. The answer to my question is: Some college: 102.28 College graduates: 110....


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If you search for "IQ students" on google scholar since 2012 you will find plenty of literature. However, the problem will be that there are many different "standardised intelligence tests", and not all of them call themselves "IQ". You might want to restrict your search to a specific test like the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale which is one of the most ...



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