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6

As you have already hinted at, the issue is controversial. I could leave it at that and say "no, there is no consensus", and it would be a true answer, but it wouldn't be satisfying, wouldn't it? Instead, I'll briefly define the topic, give a few examples, and then a few recent criticisms. My answer will be weighted somewhat towards "cognition" instead of ...


6

Freudian psychology (and it's derivatives) are indeed pseudoscience, by and large. That said, Freud was arguably the first to systematically theorize and study human behavior and cognition, and in so doing laid the foundation for the scientific study of psychology. It's generally useful for the purpose of such discussions to distinguish between Freudian ...


5

This isn't quite what you are looking for, but it's close enough that it might help you find additional information. Munro (2010) found evidence that people tend to discount the scientific possibility of studying something when presented with scientific evidence that goes against their current beliefs. In other words, if people were shown a result that went ...


5

In my mind there are two main explanations of this kind of instinct behaviours. The first one is rooted in evolution. There are many examples of human innate behaviours which we can't explain e.g. when we see a lace or tape on the street we automatically jump and feel scared. Although we live in big city our brain associates the lace with a snake. It is ...


5

Mueser and colleagues (1990) examined 117 DSM-III-R schizophrenic or schizoaffective disorder patients and reported a prevalence of 16% for visual hallucinations. Interestingly, they found that the global severity of illness was higher in patients with schizophrenia and visual hallucinations. Teeple and colleagues (2009) observe that this finding makes sense ...


4

Paco Mitchell at Depth Insights lists the following reference for “the unconscious can only wish”: For an informed critique of Freud’s comment and of psychoanalytic theory in general, see C. G. Jung, The Theory of Psychoanalysis (New York: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 1915). Full text is available at Archive.org. You may also want to search ...


4

I think this recent paper fits your requirements. It considers biological plausibility by showing that the number of neurons required in the proposed method is within a reasonable size for the human brain, and dismisses a series of unreasonable models. Specifically, they create a neural network that contains 2.5 million neurons to contain a network of ...


4

I believe this is referring to David McClelland's 1961 book "The Achieving Society."* McClelland proposed that an achievement motivation (desire for achievement) could predict economic growth and success. He examined this from a range of social and individual psychological factors, including the achievement content of "cultural products" such as children's ...


4

A great open lecture set is Human Behavioral Biology by Robert Sopolsky through Stanford. It's on YouTube. I also recommend Paul Bloom's Intro to Psych through Yale open courses.


4

That moment is often called the "aha moment", the Eureka effect, or more generally, insight. There is literature on it, but as you might expect, it is a pretty difficult thing to produce in a lab. Some references: The AHA! experience: Creativity through emergent binding in neural networks. Thagard, Paul; Stewart, Terrence C.. Cognitive Science35.1 (Jan-Feb ...


4

I understand confirmation bias as including this. The Wikipedia page you link has a section on "persistence of discredited beliefs" that corroborates my perspective: Confirmation biases can be used to explain why some beliefs persist when the initial evidence for them is removed.[45] This belief perseverance effect has been shown by a series of ...


4

I think you have three core questions: What is true intelligence and how can it be measured? To what extent does school performance correlate with true intelligence? To what extent does school performance cause true intelligence to change? Intelligence tests provide the best known means to measure general cognitive ability. There is a huge literature on ...


3

Using Google's search by image feature, I found that the image is usually entitled Richard Gregory dalmatian. From there, I found this page, which cites the image as coming from Gregory's 1970 book The Intelligent Eye. There's also, incidentally, a good list of Gregory's publications on this personal web page, which is probably worth looking at. From a ...


3

Is pedophilia a sexual orientation? The common definition of "sexual orientation" is: A preference for sexual partners of a specific gender. The common definition of "pedophilia" is: A preference for sexual partners of a specific age (prepubescent). Since age is not the same as gender, it follows that pedophilia is not a sexual orientation by ...


3

The table found at your second link (comparing the IPIP NEO and official NEO) seems to have come from this paper by Goldberg (1999): http://projects.ori.org/lrg/PDFs_papers/A%20broad-bandwidth%20inventory.pdf. This paper discusses the generation of the IPIP items as well as the sample it was originally administered in. A 2006 paper (also by Goldberg) ...


3

Searching for "meditation" on Google Scholar sorts articles by relevance and provides counts of citations that each has received. From the first page of about 686,000 results, these are the references with over 1000 citations each (I've sorted them by citations, which Google Scholar does not do easily): Kabat-Zinn, J. (1994). Wherever you go, there you ...


3

Signals and System by Oppenheim (and others) was developed while he was teaching 6.003 at MIT. Similarly Foundations of Analog and Digital Electronic Circuits by Agarwal (and others) was developed while he was teaching 6.002 at MIT. Circuits, Signals and Systems by Siebert was written while he was teaching at MIT. Siebert was before my time, but I believe ...


2

Making Up The Mind by Chris Frith is fantastic for a casual introduction to general Psychology concepts. ( http://www.amazon.com/Making-Mind-Brain-Creates-Mental/dp/1405160225/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1386952875&sr=8-1&keywords=Making+Up+The+Mind ) I would also recommend Bonk! by Mary Roach if you're looking for an easy read to ease you into the ...


2

The "quote" seems not to be verbatim, at least not from Freud. Ferenczi (1910, p. 21) describes Freud's views of the unconscious with the words: "Das Unbewußte kann nichts als wünschen", sagt Freud. ["The unconscious can only wish," says Freud.] Others, like Kaplan (1917), von Geijerstam (1920), or Jung (see Nick's answer), have used similar phrases to ...


2

I have started to see a fair bit of discussion about reproducible meta-analysis. Tim Churches seems to have a github repository with a few examples of meta-analyses in R. See in particular the public health example: RMarkdown source Formatted Markdown output


2

Since asking the question, I was able to locate a first-person account of monothematic delusion, namely, of denial of ownership of one's own limbs (somatoparaphrenia/asomatognosia). It is due to the neurologist and writer Oliver Sacks, who in his fourth book A Leg to Stand On (1984) described his recovery after a fall in a remote region of Norway in which he ...


2

Another relevant resource might be Stephen Kosslyn's Clear and to the Point. It's a book about designing presentations based on psychological principles. The principles that he covers certainly generalize beyond slides for presentations. I've read it myself, and would recommend it to designers who are unfamiliar with psychological research. If you are ...


2

Based on your description I was able to find the following: -Klatzky, R.L. & Rafnel, K. (1976).Labeling effects on memory for nonsense pictures. Memory & Cognition, 4(6), 717-720. (there is a pdf version on researchgate.net, I couldn't upload it here) -Bower, G.H., Karlin, M.B., & Dueck, A. (1975). Comprehension and memory for pictures. Memory ...


2

has made it possible to have perfect input/output to the brain from a computer Perfect? Definitely not: the complexities of optogenetics of a single mm square of cortex, of a mouse lets say, are extremely complex. As Chuck mentions, many neurons/synapses may be activated by a single LASER and current technologies allow only a few different LASER ...


1

Hofstadter provides a detailed set of criteria in Fluid Concepts and Creative Analogies. Some of his criteria that I do not see mentioned above concern the flow of information-processing: whether or not the model evaluated flows through possibility space in a psychologically plausible way, and how to measure that. He also mentions, metaphorically, the ...


1

With regard to the relationship between the brain and complexity theory, I think it's important to remember that the brain hardly ever comes up with exact solutions to problems and seems to prefer inductive reasoning to deduction. (How to induce a minesweeper strategy computationally) Furthermore, we mostly conjure up approximations. Précis of Bayesian ...


1

Several factors may influence a person to finish off other peopla's sentences. - The person may be stressed (and some people stress more often than others, thus stress may cause some people to do this more often) - ADHD is said to cause an impatience, making the clients finish off other people's sentences: http://www.healthline.com/health/adult-adhd - A ...


1

Hi there had the same problem but i found the original report: Wickens, C. D., Helleberg, J., Goh, J., Xu, X., & Horrey, W. J. (2001). Pilot Task Management: Testing an Attentional Expected Value Model of Visual Scanning (Technical Report No. ARL-01-14/NASA-01-7). NASA Ames Research Center. Retrieved from ...



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