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The Directory of Open Access Journals is a great place to start when searching for Open Access Journals in any field. You can browse through journals for the specific subject areas like Psychology or Neurology, or you can search for journals or articles containing certain keywords. The DOAJ lists articles in multiple languages as well, not just English ...


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Frontiers is an example of a collection of different open access journals where you find some high-impact publications within the cognitive science field. They have A LOT of journals within the neuroscience and the psychology field. This is what Frontiers themselves says about impact factors of their journals: Thomson ISI requires at least three ...


6

Usually citations of gray literature should be avoided. If, however, it is necessary, the APA suggests to provide as much information as possible (see, for instance, the APA style blog). For specific style suggestions, see, for instance, a library handout summarizing the APA guides on gray literature.


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Relatively specific for Judgement and Decision Making the Journal (Impact factor: 1.632) of the JDM Society might be of interest. Additionally the Directory of Open Access Journals might be of interest.


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If you're going to be submitting articles to APA journals you should have access to the APA Publication Manual 6th edition. And it is useful to use a template (see here for discussion of 6th edition LaTeX packages) and a citation system that supports the rules. There are changes that permit new things (e.g., longer abstracts, bullet lists, and keywords are ...


5

Have you tried: connectomeviewer http://www.connectomeviewer.org/viewer brainnetviewer http://www.nitrc.org/projects/bnv/ which is a toolbox for the SPM software package http://www.fil.ion.ucl.ac.uk/spm/ Gephi http://gephi.org/ Trackvis http://trackvis.org/ Also Nico Dosenbach has some amazing picture of brain connectivity in this paper ...


4

Scientific Data: After asking my question, I did a quick search and found one promising journal that will commence in 2014 called Scientific Data. Scientific Data is a new open-access, online-only publication for descriptions of scientifically valuable datasets. It introduces a new type of content called the Data Descriptor, which will combine ...


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Benefits of PsychInfo PsychInfo has more accurate metadata. PsychInfo permits more controlled search terms over that metadata. PsycInfo makes it easy to download a set of references. Without using third party tools Google Scholar only exports one reference at a time (as far as I am aware). PsycInfo contains abstracts for quick browsing. Google scholar ...


3

The numbers inside the parentheses are the degrees of freedom for the F-statistic. The second number is the within-group degrees of freedom. When you have the same number of subjects in all conditions, then the second number will be the number of subjects - the number of cells (conditions) in your design.


3

There are several MedLine search engines, some of them requiring an (academic) account. You may want to use ISI Web of Knowledge - http://isiknowledge.com/medline, EbscoHost - http://search.ebscohost.com/login.asp?profile=web&defaultdb=cmedm, ProQuest - http://search.proquest.com/medline/advanced Ovid - http://gateway.ovid.com/autologin.html By ...


3

Unfortunately, I'm not sure there's a quick answer to the exact amount of overlap, but you may be able to get an estimate by comparing the list of journals included in Medline (http://www.nlm.nih.gov/archive/20130415/tsd/serials/lji.html.notice.html) to the list of journals covered by PsycINFO (http://www.apa.org/pubs/databases/psycinfo/coverage.aspx). Also, ...


3

At the rate the literature grows and journals proliferate, it is often hard to keep up with current trends. I find one of the best way to do this is to follow specific researchers that have research interested similar to me. Google Scholar allows authors to create profiles that collect their papers automatically. Researchers on Google Scholar: Psychology, ...


3

One thing that hasn't yet been mentioned: if you find a paper you want that's not open access, many researchers nowadays put pdfs of their work on their personal sites. The easy solution is therefore to google the name of each author, starting with the first, plus something like "Publications", or if they have a common name, add "Publications, Psychology" to ...


3

Another resource is Sherpa/Romeo which aims to be a site to help you "find a summary of permissions that are normally given as part of each publisher's copyright transfer agreement". For example, here's what it says about Journal of Applied Psychology. Author's Pre-print: author can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing) Author's Post-print: ...


3

To touch on your broader question, as I understand getting full text publications in conferences are highly respected in computer science. In psychology and neuroscience (note I don't know so much about computational neuroscience), publishing papers in high impact journals is more respected in the field. While some conferences do have full-length papers, ...


3

I get the impression that good journal editors will get at least one reviewer who is skilled in the methodology used in the paper. The importance of this reviewer role would presumably vary with the statistical or other methodological complexity of the paper. That said, reviewing is well known to be imperfect particularly when it comes to checking all the ...


3

This does not really answer your question (because it doesn't deal in detail with methodological issues), but there is a nice journal article that deals with problems of the peer review process in general by evaluating "great scientific works of the past" from the perspective of current social sciences: Trafimov, D., & Rice, S. (2009). What if social ...


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The Journal of Open Psychology Data: A great project spearheaded by Jelte M. Wicherts, longtime open science advocate. Unfortunately, it has only published one paper so far.


2

Answering to my own question: Avogadro is a molecule editor, but for visualization purposes it does not check the validity of the molecule, thus permitting its usage in the creation of publication-quality 3D ball-and-stick models of any subject matter, such as brain connectivity networks. Avogadro reads several molecule file formats, for example .cml is an ...


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The F ratio statistic has a numerator and denominator degrees of freedom. Thus, you report: F (numerator_df, denominator_df) = F_value, p = ..., effect size = ... The numerator degrees of freedom relates to the factor of interest; the denominator degrees of freedom corresponds to the degrees of freedom for the error variance. The exact way that these ...


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I do not know of any computational neuroscience conference with proceedings that is always held in Europe. Neural information processing systems (NIPS) was held in Europe only once recently, but back in US. (it was in Spain on 2011) International joint conference on neural networks (IJCNN) has minor section on computational neuroscience but it's mostly ...


1

This is a subjective question and what is useful would depend on from which domain of cognitive science the article originated. In general, I prefer when the PDF looks like the journal article (i.e., no formatting to indicate links). Here is a list of things that I find useful: Links from in text citations to the location of the full reference Links from ...



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