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8

I would go with Physics. Physicists study the world using mathematics, while mathematicians study mathematics itself which is a construct that does not necessarily exist in the real world (Albert Einstein once said: "as far as the laws of mathematics refer to reality, they are not certain; and as far as they are certain, they do not refer to reality."). ...


5

In psychophysics, this is known as an absolute threshold. The absolute threshold will depend on a variety of factors such as brightness, size, etc. It is also important to keep in mind that the time needed to detect a stimulus may be too short to cause some desired effect on the participant (e.g. a manipulation). For example, the time needed to detect a ...


5

Now that @ofri has presented a good argument for physics, I'll give a few arguments for the benefits of a course in maths, and particularly a math course that focuses heavily on statistics. There are many areas of psychology where a good understanding of statistics is very helpful. Statistics is particularly useful in psychometrics, mathematical ...


4

If n != m then it will not home in on the 50 % threshold. In these simple N-up/N-down staircases, you can modify either the stepsize (as you proposed) or the number of successes/failures to act as a criterion for upgrade/downgrade. A comprehensive introduction to these staircases and the effect of changing these properties can be found in this paper. The 80 ...


3

I found a paper called Summary statistics in auditory perception (McDermott, Schemitsch & Simoncelli, 2013) that might be relevant to your question. If you can't access it in full, you can a great description of the paper here. Please note that I'm writing about it from memory and that some details might not be correct. The authors had a task where ...


3

This depends on intensity but it is shorter at most intensities than your screen could possibly present a stimulus. Don't worry about it or cite references. It would be like citing a reference for why you don't need to worry about quantum effects when testing the best kind of screwdriver.


3

Mainly: the choice of variables. Beware that the exponent depends on the choice of parameters; or even worse - relations can change from power-law to linear, logarithmic or exponential, with redefining variables. E.g. you can measure sound volume in either amplitude, energy density (square of the amplitude) or dB (logarithm of the first one). None of it is ...


3

Research articles by Igor Dolgov (NMSU) and Mike McBeath (ASU) are good research-grade articles on this topic. They are both active scientists with well-referenced papers. I chose to work around them because of the quality of their ideas. Dolgov is more focused on Ecological perceptual models. McBeath is an illusion 'junkie'. Bother have done much work ...


3

I never read any English textbooks on psychophysics, so I cannot help you there. If I wanted to find a good one, I would look at the curricula at some universities and see which books they use or recommend. Such information is often available online. Beyond a textbook, like user1406647 (+1), I find it enlightening to read classic experiments by the ...


2

Try to find following authors and researches: Fechner, S.S. Stevens and Weber. Those experiments are easily to reproduce... New psychophysic is melted with neuroscience in some way. a/ it is easy to reproduce if you don't have expensive equipment; b/ it shows how physics and psychology shows outer and inner world respectively ie. on physics side you can ...


2

It's not exactly what you're after, but the Newcastle Cognition Lab has a data repository. It includes a number of learning curve datasets and other studies that measured response time to various simple cognitive tasks.


2

I guess it depends on your purpose. If you are doing the MDS for more heuristic purposes, then often two dimensions (or possibly three) will provide the greatest visual insight. Also, my sense from looking at your dimension by stress plot is that the greatest gains are attained when going from one to two dimensions, that the gain from two to three ...


1

For these types of questions I really like Detection Theory: A User's Guide by Macmillan and Creelman. They consider 3 types of bias. The criterion location c is calculated relative to the zero-bias point and expressed in units of standard deviations, such that a c of 1 means the criterion is 1 standard deviation to the right of the zero-bias location and a ...


1

I'm not completely sure what you ask. I give my comment as an answer, because there is more space here. I'll delete it, if you feel I'm off the mark. As far as physical theory goes (and I understand it), sound is the movement of air molecules and the resulting fluctuation in density. Measuring these density fluctuations and representing them in numbers ...



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