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For several reasons, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) should have a good fit for someone who has a skeptic and scientific outlook on life. There is a large body of research showing that CBT is effective (see e.g., Hofmann et al. 2012). Obviously, this also depends on the kind of disorder. And of course, other forms of therapy can be effective too. ...


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Freudian psychology (and it's derivatives) are indeed pseudoscience, by and large. That said, Freud was arguably the first to systematically theorize and study human behavior and cognition, and in so doing laid the foundation for the scientific study of psychology. It's generally useful for the purpose of such discussions to distinguish between Freudian ...


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Yes, they are still in use, and they provide rather bad information. My former advisor once worked with a clinician who told him that the main reason they're any better than using the weather report as a projective stimulus is that the Rorschach tests have been in use as-is for decades. Hence we have a better understanding of how people normally react to ...


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Jocasta complex syndrome is what you are referring to. In psychoanalytic analysis, the Jocasta complex is the incestuous sexual desire of a mother towards her son. SOURCE


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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. It started as a pure-conditioning school, but it later on took on evidence from studies in cognition. It's the school that holds the most science behind it. Some of its history can be found at its wikipedia page: Although the early behavioral approaches were successful in many of the neurotic disorders, they had little ...


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Hard question to answer. Some of his ideas appear to have found little in the way of experimental support, some of his ideas are at present untestable, some have been supported by experimental studies. The late psychometrician Paul Kline conducted a number of studies and found mixed results. I can recommend his book on Freudian theory and psychology. He ...


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"Jung had the notion of an archetype, a universally known symbol." Archetypes and symbols are two different things. Jacobi explains it in her excellent book, Complex Archetype Symbol in the Psychology of C. G. Jung. "there is a lot of evidence that he viewed archetypes as innate predispositions with an organizing function" I'd like to see that "evidence". ...



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