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19

As far as I know, there is no accepted science to dream interpretation. In fact, there's no science to it at all. Evidence has shown that indeed, dreaming draws material from people, places, and things in our lives, but there's absolutely no scientific data out there (that I'm familiar with) that links dreams to anything meaningful in our actual daily lives. ...


7

The term "Oedipus complex" refers to a son's desire for his mother (very simplified). The corresponding construct, denoting the desire a daughter might feel for her father, is called the "Electra complex" (the term was introduced by C. G. Jung but rejected by Freud, so it does not really exist on the same level of fundamental concepts as the "Oedipus ...


6

In a letter to Marie Bonaparte, Freud wrote: Im Moment, da man nach Sinn und Wert des Lebens fragt, ist man krank, denn beides gibt es ja in objektiver Weise nicht; man hat nur eingestanden, daß man einen Vorrat von unbefriedigender Libido hat, und irgend etwas anderes muß damit vorgefallen sein, eine Art Gärung, die zur Trauer und Depression führt. ...


6

As you mentioned in your question, Jung was less than perfectly consistent in his definition of archetype throughout his career. This ambiguity reflects the continuing debate about semantic representation in the brain. His early work stressed the emergence of archetypes as fundamental dichotomies of self experience- whose Enantiodromaic character was the ...


5

As far as I know, dreams are meaningless information, strung into a story or series of events and interpretation are therefore highly subjective. The theory that I know best is that dreams are a result of memory consolidation during sleep. Of course, this is still controversial. Memory consolidation is explained (simple version) as follows: during ...


4

This is Freud's own original diagram: Please note that only the uppermost part of the self, the part labelled "pcpt-cs" (i.e. perception-consciousness, German Wachbewusstsein) constitutes our conscious thought. All three parts of the psychic apparatus are not conscious. Some parts of the Ego and Super-Ego are preconscious and can potentially become ...


4

Paco Mitchell at Depth Insights lists the following reference for “the unconscious can only wish”: For an informed critique of Freud’s comment and of psychoanalytic theory in general, see C. G. Jung, The Theory of Psychoanalysis (New York: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 1915). Full text is available at Archive.org. You may also want to search ...


4

We could have scientific clinical study of the reports of dreams. Given that the dreams don't relate to specific real world events and often have very bizarre properties there's no reason to believe the report has much to do with what really happened. Therefore, from a clinicians standpoint they're useful in that you're in a relaxed state when they occur ...


3

I was influenced by this lecture. I will jump ahead to the pertinent part: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Ei6wFJ9kCc&t=59m20s My interpretation is that there are two general areas in the brain responsible for memory formation: 1) hippocampus and 2) basal ganglia. According to the speaker, a study shows a direct correlation between the amount of ...


2

The "quote" seems not to be verbatim, at least not from Freud. Ferenczi (1910, p. 21) describes Freud's views of the unconscious with the words: "Das Unbewußte kann nichts als wünschen", sagt Freud. ["The unconscious can only wish," says Freud.] Others, like Kaplan (1917), von Geijerstam (1920), or Jung (see Nick's answer), have used similar phrases to ...


2

Yes. The best reviews are done circumscribed to certain areas of focus, like disorder. For example, here is a study that examines the comparative efficacy of all "bona fide" treatments for trauma (e.g., prolonged exposure, EMDR, cognitive therapy, etc): http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18055080 There are also wider comparisons, but these are fraught with ...



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