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9

It's a matter of degree. First of all, "shyness" is not a psychological or psychiatric term, but an everyday English word denoting a commonly observable personality characteristic on a par with courage, cheerfulness, or honesty. The meaning of "shyness" is not exactly defined, and people may use the word "shyness" to refer to different kinds of behaviors, ...


3

I can't say whether Viktor Frankl is respected by modern psychologists on average, or how respected he is. Anecdotally, I have heard of both Frankl and logotherapy, but not enough to know much more than that they exist. The real question, though, is whether there is any empirical support for logotherapy, and overall, the evidence (for or against logotherapy) ...


3

A Love Circuit? The idea that there is a "love circuit" has little evidence (for or against it). But in general studies that look at "love" (however defined) reveal broad activation across multiple intrinsic neural networks that are involved in many different cognitive processes (in favor of a constructivist view of emotions). Consider the image from a ...


3

The short version is that in Europe and North America, at least, the answer is predominantly yes: your GP is supposed to refer you to a relevant mental practitioner on a case by case basis. This can be prompted either by voluntary disclosure (i.e., the patient brings up mental health issues themselves) or suggested based on comments made by the patients. GPs ...


3

The article you link to is fairly comprehensive, and probably already answers your questions. Dissociative Identity Disorder is no longer referred to as multiple personality disorder. This is a highly misunderstood disorder, and involves many possible symptoms besides the appearance of "alters". "The diagnosis itself remains controversial among mental ...


2

Grønbæk and Nielsen (2007) conducted a randomized, controlled study of the Minnesota model for treating alcohol dependence in Denmark. 148 alcohol dependent individuals participated. The study reported a significant difference in alcohol abstinence between control and treatment groups when data was aggregated over the one-year period. However, by the end of ...


2

Since asking the question, I was able to locate a first-person account of monothematic delusion, namely, of denial of ownership of one's own limbs (somatoparaphrenia/asomatognosia). It is due to the neurologist and writer Oliver Sacks, who in his fourth book A Leg to Stand On (1984) described his recovery after a fall in a remote region of Norway in which he ...


2

No, people who have experienced some psychopathology, went into cognitive therapy and resolved their problems would most likely not benefit strongly from continuing cognitive therapy. However, they may still benefit from additional therapy in case of relapsing or future problems. Cognitive therapy Cognitive therapy is a short-term therapy that was designed ...


1

The issue here is 'normality' - normal is a shifting social construct, meaning that any answer concerning normal will be based on culture, and thus could change depending on the culture in context. A better question would be, is it adaptive or maladaptive for the person in question. But I don't think that's what you're asking - (I could be wrong) it ...


1

The accepted answer is correct, it is basically a matter of degree, plus some other things. Adding more details, refer to the following definition of Social Anxiety Disorder (previously known as Social Phobia) taken from The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 5th edition: A. A persistent fear of one or more social or performance ...



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