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8

Facial shape Aggression relates to facial width-to-height ratio (Carré, McCormick, & Mondloch, 2009). The width-to-height ratio is the distance between the left and right zygion (the outside of the cheek bone) divided by the distance between the top of the upper lip and the mid-brow. Here's a useful image displaying the meaning of this ratio from that ...


7

The real question here is whether traditional personality dimensions have such a big influence on behavior as usually thought or, perhaps, if there is such a thing as being “really and truly extroverted from the ground up”. Once you begin to admit that circumstances play an important role or that personality traits are fuzzy types, being “truly extroverted” ...


6

This is an extremely interesting question. I'm going to take a different approach to the question by focusing on both personality traits and leadership theories (e.g. authentic leadership, transformational leadership, servant leadership etc) to answer whether those two distinct areas can influence leaders' children's development. I will admit that I didn't ...


6

A useful model for topics like this comes from McCrae and Costa (1999): There's quite a lot more going on here than is pertinent to your question, but note that influences originate from biological bases on the top left, and from external influences on the upper right. Everything else is modeled as an effect of mediated, dynamic processes between these ...


6

Personality studies are typically investigated via the "big five" traits. Some attempts to legitimize the personality traits through biology have been pursued [1]. Following are some excerpts from a particular study that proposed a hypothesis and searched for confirmation in 116 subjects. Of course, this means we should be wary of confirmation bias when ...


5

I guess it depends on what you mean by "false beliefs". If you mean beliefs such as magical thinking, illusory patterns, superstitious beliefs, etc, then the following may help. From an evolutionary perspective, Foster and Koko (2009) argue that false beliefs such as superstitious thoughts/rituals may arise due to the consequence of making a false-negative ...


5

Perhaps check out the Obsessive Beliefs Questionnaire which is designed to measures dysfunctional beliefs related to OCD. There are several papers that examine the factor structure, and perfectionism is typically seen as one of the major aspects of obsessive beliefs. However, it seems to be a particular form of maladaptive perfectionism. See these ...


4

Yes, there are benefits, but I don't think it requires long-term switches. Studies have used this as a manipulation to try and increase self control and have found that it decrease aggression. Based on this, once one has mastered using the non-dominant hand, it seems like the benefit of continuing to use that hand might be over (as it no longer requires ...


4

General observations: As a general observation, I find that the MBTI is very popular in professional development contexts such as team building. In contrast, the Big 5 is very popular in research contexts. Several obvious reasons exist for this. MBTI is typically interpreted in terms of types rather than position on a continuum, whereas Big 5 is ...


4

I am using TRUE (http://www.salleurl.edu/tsenyal/true/features.html) and SAM (Self-Assessment Manikin) interface includes a scale for dominance, along with valence and activation. The scale allows you to rate dominance from 'controlled' to 'in control' on a scale from 1 to 9. References Planet, S., Iriondo, I., Martínez, E., & Montero, J. A. (2008). ...


4

Crossing arms may not necessarily mean detachment or rejection. However, more often than not, that's the usual implication. It can mean different things for different people and, furthermore, in different situations. Some people cross arms to make themselves secure, perhaps when they are intellectually or physically overshadowed. Or maybe when they are ...


4

There is a large general literature evaluating the degree to which personality tests predict job performance. In particular see for example the review by Barrick et al (2001). In general such reviews find that personality measures provide a small but meaningful prediction of job performance. Ipsative testing So in general, you are asking about how ...


4

Ahh yes, The Secret. I'd recommend starting with Wikipedia for a critical view of the "law of attraction" and the book as a whole. The former page has some particularly good excerpts to offer (emphasis added; hyperlinks not preserved, though I'd appreciate help editing them back in): Skeptical Inquirer magazine criticized the lack of falsifiability and ...


4

I've edited your question somewhat; I hope I preserved its meaning. Neuroticism relates to personal discomfort largely by definition, and probably to uncomfortable social interaction as well, though somewhat less by definition. Consider this hypothetical, mediated pathway: Neuroticism $\rightarrow$ Anxiety $\rightarrow$ Social anxiety $\rightarrow$ ...


4

Several other disorders relate to introversion, including: Avoidant personality disorder (Morey et al., 2002) Obsessive-compulsive disorder (Samuels et al., 2000) Schizotypal personality disorder (Funder, 1997? Don't have it on-hand, but will try to verify this later when I do.) Schizoid personality disorder (Morey et al., 2002) Generalized anxiety ...


4

There are no personality models in which the factors are orthogonal in the strict sense of being at 90 degrees from one another, unless an orthogonal rotation method is used to extract them. I think you meant to say that the Big Five factors are less independent (or more strongly inter-correlated) relative to the factors in other models. Whether or not one ...


3

In a previous post on the global personality factor, you provided examples to describe how self-report items indicating higher trait levels are phrased in more socially desirable terms, hence the positive bias. I think it's important to distinguish between two (or three) kinds of biases here: one is related to the wording/content of the items (the positive ...


3

I imagine there are many ways of looking at this question. Here are just a few ideas: Society and specialisation: One lens for viewing this question is to focus on the reward structure of our society. There are many forces in society which encourage specialisation and the development of specific expertise. Careers are typically built around developing ...


3

Personality is generally theorised to be a stable individual difference variable. Research has shown it to be highly stable over time. Thus, from a theoretical perspective it typically has a primacy in causal models. Stress can be an ambiguous construct. It can refer to the objective existence of stressful stimuli or the way that individuals perceive ...


3

Is there a psychological condition which promotes literal and overly complicated thinking? Yes, I think so... Its called intelligence. Is this a known condition? You want a literal answer? Then "Yes" What, neurologically, may cause this in the brain? Something amiss in the corpus callosum Are there ways to improve this? If you can ...


3

Research on well-being has explored happiness from different temporal perspectives. Much of the literature looks at how people respond to measures of life satisfaction, quality of life, and measures of tendencies to experience positive and negative emotion. These tend to reflect longer term evaluations and emotional experiences. This shows up in for ...


3

Basically an introverted or shy person is caught in a viscious circle: you don't interact with people much because often you don't feel the need because of this you don't have much practice in interacting with other people so if you try to interact when you do feel the urge, you feel that you don't interact very successfully or even "fail" this in turn ...



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