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10

The source I have quoted below gives an example of the following stenographic image:- Is this perception a particular trick that my eye performs or is it processing the visual data in an alternative way? Stereograms can be viewed as three-dimensional images by providing two side-by-side views of a three-dimensional scene, rendered from slightly ...


7

Seems that you are asking: I am really interested just in the way the brain creates new electrical potentials, "just on his own." and whether [sic] the brain would 'stop working', implying that there no longer is any neural activity due to the lack of external impulses. If you were to theoretically disconnect the brain from all sensory input, ...


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Short answer Hair cells in the cochlea can code sound intensity via the amount of neurotransmitter they release. Higher sound levels result in more neurotransmitter release and in turn to higher firing rates in the spiral ganglion cells of the auditory nerve. Background Sound waves are picked up by the mechanoreceptors in the inner ear: the hair cells. ...


7

No, inner speech does not follow the same neural pathway as speech coming in from outside. Rather, inner speech uses the same neural mechanism as outer speech - that is, speech going out. The neural mechanisms of inner speech can be studied using recently developed technologies such as fMRI imaging of subjects instructed to or prevented from engaging in ...


6

Psychophysiology is totally outside of my wheelhouse, but here it goes… Those feelings in your chest, face, arms, etc. aren't an illusion. Indeed, it's long been argued that physiological arousal (in your body) is a core component of emotional experience (e.g., James, 1884; Russell, 1980)--alongside feelings of pleasure and displeasure. Moreover, that ...


6

Objects are visually perceived when they reflect light. A black object does not reflect any light. In other words, no photons are reflected to be detected by the photoreceptors in the retina. A black shape on a colored background appears black because its brightness approaches zero relative to its surroundings. Black, as any other perceived hue, is a ...


5

I never thought that my Bachelor Thesis would ever come in handy. Thank you for this question! Short answer No, you cannot keep up two unrelated rhythms in a stable coordinated fashion when tapping for your finger for instance. Long Answer Let us start with (and skip over) the oldest paper that I have about it. Haken, Kelso and Bunz (1985) described in a ...


5

In general, subjective sensation increases linearly with the the log of physical intensity, which is described by Fechner's law. We are sensitive to small variations when light is dim, but we need large differences in intensity under conditions of high luminance (Weber's law). This is a linear relation, but taken together with Fechner these findings are ...


5

Assuming your question is "Is person's ego a projection of the responses of their amygdala onto the conscious experience?", I think it would translate to "Does the amygdala determines or houses the ego". In that light, the question hinges on the meaning of ego. Given the question is asked at Cognitive Sciences SE, I assume the ego is "The part of the mind ...


5

In general, evidence suggests that we are attracted to contrast rather than brightness (luminance). For example, the onset of a bright light on a dark background is often used as an exogenous cue for visual attention, but a dark cue on a bright background works just as well. So, signs generally aim to be high contrast against their background. Contrast shows ...


4

The phenomenon of not being able to visualise has recently been dubbed "aphantasia" by Adam Zeman at Exeter: see the university's press release Can’t count sheep? You could have aphantasia. They had a year-long project which finished a few days ago called The Eye's Mind to study people at both ends of the ability spectrum. One of their objectives is to ...


4

As far as I know, there is just one article that explicitly mentions the generation of cross-modal qualia, i.e., visual qualia in response to tactile stimulation (Ortiz et al., 2011). Before continuing about this article I do wish to emphasize it is a single, isolated study that hasn't been supported by other studies at the time of this writing. Moreover, ...


4

I would read this paper, its mighty interesting. Books Snyder, B.(2000) Music and memory: An introduction. The MIT Press. Cambridge 291. Hemispheric Coordination and Conflict "...while listening to the melody of the popular carol "Silent Night", the right hemisphere thinks, "Ah, yes, Silent Night", while the left hemisphere thinks, "two sequences: ...


4

A study by Rainer et al. (2011) has shown that words are skipped and apparently filled in mentally quite often (in the order of 8 to 30% of times). Two important factors that increased skipping rates were the length of the word and the predictability of the word due to contextual constraints. Both cases apply on the word 'the', because it is short and ...


4

Short answer Sensations are different from thoughts and are separated in the spatial and temporal domain. The distinction between thoughts and perceptions, however, is less well defined, but can still be dealt with experimentally. Background A description of sensation is as follows: The physical process during which our sensory organs [...] respond to ...


4

It's a difficult question to answer. My educated guess is that the appearance of the triangle, and illusionary contours in general, would persist, even in individuals who have never seen a triangle before in their lives. I think they would perceive the illusionary contours, but it might just not make sense to them, as the shapes may be unfamilair to them. In ...


3

Short answer Females are more sensitive to some, but not all somatosensory stimuli. Males are either less sensitive, or as sensitive as females. Background A normative study by Blankenburg et al. (2010) determined reference values for a battery of somatosensory tests including cold detection threshold (CDT); warm detection threshold (WDT); thermal sensory ...


3

Short answer In the case of simple stimuli, visual and auditory stimuli can be offset between 25 and 50 ms and still be perceived as coming from one and the same same event. Background The question can be re-phrased as what is the window of integration of intersensory asynchrony in case of visual and auditory stimuli? A well-known example where these two ...


3

This isn't exactly what you are referring to, but I think provides a similar function and has been shown in vertebrate vision: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Normalization_model Divisive normalization as a canonical computation across the brain While this does not implement histogram equalization, I think it is actually a better-suited explanation of the ...


3

Physics Perhaps you are asking, "Where would the energy, or the electrical potential, come from?" Short answer: Sugar. Or, at the cellular level, ATP. Point is -- nerve impulses from the senses are [probably] not the brain's main source of energy. Internal Stimulation The five senses provide external stimulation to the brain. But that stimulation takes ...


3

This is not quite your question, but it's the closest thing I know of. There's a significant amount of work suggesting that purely morphological attributes can shape conceptualization: looking at the impact of grammatical gender on the attributes assigned to the nouns that have a specific grammatical gender--that is, grammatically male nouns are rated ...


2

As mentioned in the definitions section on page 2 of the paper, $D(q||p) = <ln(q/p)>_q$ is the Kullback-Leibler divergence or cross-entropy between two densities. The reason for the negative logs is that is the convention when discussing entropy in the context of information theory. This allows information to be combined additively. (https://en....


2

Short answer "Perceptual competence" is "the ability to perceive". Background I Googled "perceptual competence" and the first hit was an open source article (Lencz et al., 2003). They define perceptual competence as: [The] initial representation of to-be-remembered material [in the context of working memory]. Perceptual competency itself can include ...


2

Extensively. Most prominently, recently, by David Poeppel, Oded Ghitza and Anne-Lise Giraud, in a series of papers. They've, to be precise, mostly focused on MEG correlations with the filtered speech amplitude envelope. Areas around the auditory cortex track it fairly well it seems. There is still much debate about what this means and where it comes from, ...


2

The N170 (the face selective component of the brain) is commonly mapped indeed to OFA or FFA. It's trivial to find examples for this, e.g.: this, this, this, this, this. Many more studies can be found by searching the relevant data bases, e.g. like this. Some of these include co-registered EEG/fMRI or MEG. There is some uncertainty of where exactly it ...


2

There are many such illusions. It mostly belongs to pattern-recognition and gestalt psychology. From German it means "shape", "form", "essence". To answer your question, I think, here there are illusory contours (when you watch and understand an illusion) and lateral inhibition (when you have got new understanding of the picture and compare it with previous ...


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The symptoms belong to the Alice-in-Wonderland Syndrome, which is supposed to be very common in childhood. An interesting article appeared in the New York Times.


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Short answer Stereoscopic vision is the perception of depth via disparity. Disparity is the mechanism that the visual system uses to create binocular depth perception. Background A dictionary definition of Stereoscopic is the following: [N]oting or pertaining to three-dimensional vision or any of various processes and devices for giving the illusion of ...


2

It really depends. first of all, the problem might be in the person who asks, maybe they really are super sensitive and what they are upset about is not rational. Also you can never know from someones words that they lack empathy or not. Some people are just tough, maybe he was in some back breaking situations in life that yours seem minor. And also lack ...


2

At least three things play a role here: Camouflage: the panda looks like the snowman in shape and coloring. Further, the ears of the panda are the buttons of the snowmen behind, i.e. the panda partly merges with the 'background' snowmen; Clutter: there are simply many, many snowmen; Distracters: The colored hats and other attributes are more salient and ...



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