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9

I basically agree with @Nick Stauner, but I want to add another important aspect, namely the gradient of photoreceptor densities in the human retina: In the fovea there is a sharp peak in cone density compared to more eccentric regions, as described in Curcio et al. (1990) and see the following graph obtained from Web Vision: The cones have a different ...


9

Short answer Yes, there is a difference between hearing and understanding sound. Background Acoustic information is processed in different neural centers along the auditory pathway. The auditory system runs from the peripheral end organ in the inner ear (the cochlea) to the cortex. Along the way various processing steps are carried out. For ...


9

My half-baked hypothesis: The world accidentally stumbled upon the first (to my knowledge) bi-stable color illusion Here is an example of bistable illusion: This bistable illusion involves the perception of motion. Is the dancer spinning clockwise or counterclockwise? The deal is that the image is actually ambiguous. But you can't possible perceive both ...


7

The first one is a test if a child has understood conservation of matter. It is an example of a conservation task. These belong to the tests used in the framework of Piaget to test what stage of development a child is in. Here is a video demonstration of the cookie task. Here is another question on this site pertaining to a different conservation task. The ...


7

Seems this is a newly discovered phenomenon! Tangen, Murphy, and Thompson (2011) describe this as a result of their method of presentation: alignment of the pupils and fast cycling through faces with different proportions. It is also important that the cycle of new images remain uninterrupted. They say "relative encoding seems to drive the effect," and list ...


7

First I have to say that the wavelengths of light are on a totally different order of magnitude than sound. So the parallel drawn in your question "do light waves, for example one with the same wave length as a mid-C and another with a mid-F wave, look nicely together?" may seem logical, but is on closer inspection not easily maintained. Instead, one way to ...


7

Bach-y-Rita's Tactile Vision Substitution System (TVSS) project was initiated in 1963 and he has since been regarded as the founding father of sensory substitution. The concept of sensory substitution refers to the process of obtaining information about the world from a functional sensory system (e.g. touch) that would normally be obtained from a lost ...


7

Ellis (1974) thought that men prefer rotund features in women and that blonde hair creates such a roundish upper body shape because the blonde hair, which is close in color to (a white woman's) skin, would blend with the skin. In his famous book, The naked ape, Desmond Morris (1967) documented that men prefer adolescent features. In his opinion blonde hair ...


6

There's quite a bit of research related to this topic: Male CEOs with deeper voices make more money and manage larger companies (Mayew et al., 2013). People are more likely to say they would vote for a political candidate with a deeper voice (Klofstad et al., 2012; Tigue et al., 2011). People rate lower-pitched voices as more persuasive than ...


6

Unfortunately, it appears there is currently no research investigating how synaesthetes experience the binaural beats effect. If any such research does exist, it does not appear to be available (in English) via Google Scholar, Web of Science or Scopus. Furthermore, there is little research on binaural beats generally. I covered some of the scarce research ...


5

This is partially an aspect of the binding problem. Sensory information arrives in parallel as a variety of heterogeneous hints, (shapes, colors, motions, smells and sounds) encoded in partly modular systems. Typically many objects are present at once. The result is an urgent case of what has been labelled the binding problem. We must collect the hints, ...


5

Your question was a loooooong time ago, but I just ran across a couple of good references explaining what backward masking does and how to choose one. This(1) is a great paper examining the neural mechanisms and timing of visual backward masking; according to this (2) 2000 review of masking theory, there are four subtypes of backward masking. Backward ...


5

They might also just be getting better. The immune system could fight off the cold shortly after the antibiotics are taken, and they are misattributing the causality of getting better to the drugs instead of the immune system. People are prone to make errors in causal judgment of this kind.


5

This is likely related to other illusions of relative size, such as the Ebbinghaus (A) and Delboeuf (B) illusions. These illusions show that perception is not a 1:1 representation of retinal input. Instead it is a mental (re-)construction. As reviewed by Mrucek et al: an object's size is not inherently represented in the size of its projected ...


5

First of all, interesting question, and thanks for sharing the video! Secondly, you write: There seem to be no doubts that she has the same perception of music than any other great musician... I have to disagree. She may be able to sense vibrations, but it can never match normal hearing. This, because the human ear is better equipped to analyze ...


5

It is well documented that people are able to selectively attend to different speakers. The ability to tune-in to a particular speaker and filter out others was dubbed the cocktail party effect, since it is the kind of skill that is required in when trying to have a conversation with another person in a crowded party. A common way of studying this ...


4

The most well known sensory after effect illusion in the auditory system is probably the Zwicker tone (Zwicker, 1964). If a white noise with a half‐octave‐band suppression placed anywhere from 300 to 7000 Hz is presented at an over‐all sound‐pressure level of about 60 dB for 1 min and then switched off, a decaying, poststimulatory sound similar to a pure ...


4

Placebo effect is not the only explanation, although it can be a large component. To be clear: Neither of the explanations below are reasons to use antibiotics for infections not due to bacteria. They do illustrate anchoring. Just because we call a drug an antibiotic and first note its effects to be killing bacteria does not forbid that drug from having ...


4

Vogels and Orban (1985) asked subjects to complete several thousand angle judgments at near-principal angles (horizontal or vertical). They found that the just-noticeable difference (JND), the threshold at which people could reliably detect deviation from a horizontal line, was 0.5 degrees after a 600ms exposure to the stimulus. The real purpose of their ...


3

Without neural activity you wouldn't experience or perceive anything. Perception in itself is a reflection of neuronal activity. If you are referring to the question whether you can feel a neuron fire - then no, that is not possible. To 'experience' neuronal activity you should record it. There are a wide variety of methods to do that: EEG, MEG, fMRI, PET ...


3

The time required to learn Braille may vary depending on factors such as age, partial/full and early/late blindness and individual differences (see here), but what has come out of studies such as this is that visual deprivation appears to speed up Braille learning. In the study I cite, all subjects received the same degree of training, but individuals who ...


3

what has always puzzled me is the neurobiological basis that gives rise to the phenomenon that we associate our bodies with ourselves – i.e., why does my brain think of my physical body as "me" and make me care for it? In other words, why is me me at this particular point in time and not some other body living e.g. centuries ago? Why do I not ...


3

I don't buy it the claim made in the quote. The speed of sound is roughly 1 foot per millsecond so even if you take a large 3 foot step you are changing the audio visual onset asynchrony by only 3 ms. What this means is that if you present a flash and a click with various onset asynchrony to subjects you would expect there to be a narrow range of lags (less ...


3

As there is no sensory input from reality which could cause these sensations, are they technically proprioceptive hallucinations? Not really, although I think it wouldn't be completely inaccurate to think of them that way. A hallucination has no basis in reality (e.g. auditory hallucinations); what you're describing has a physical basis in reality. It ...


3

Abed, 1991 found cultural differences in visual scanning patterns that seem to reflect differences in the languages of the cultural groups. Individuals from cultures with languages than may be read vertically as opposed to horizontally tended to have more vertical eye movements than individuals from cultures with horizontally-read languages. Individuals ...


3

Yes! Binocular rivalry has been studied in monkeys (Logothetis & Schall, 1990; Lehky & Maunsell, 1996) and extensively in cats (Fries, Roelfsema, Engel, König, & Singer, 1997; Sengpiel, Blakemore, & Harrad, 1995; Sengpiel, Blakemore, Kind, & Harrad, 1994; Sengpiel, Bonhoeffer, Freeman, & Blakemore, 2001; Varela & Singer, 1987; ...


3

Using Google's search by image feature, I found that the image is usually entitled Richard Gregory dalmatian. From there, I found this page, which cites the image as coming from Gregory's 1970 book The Intelligent Eye. There's also, incidentally, a good list of Gregory's publications on this personal web page, which is probably worth looking at. From a ...


3

Short answer Yes, continuous exposure to white noise affects neural responses in the auditory system. First, it can alter the tonotopic map in the auditory cortex. Second, it can lead to reduced responsiveness of the auditory thalamus. Background Note: this answer is based on animal experiments using extreme conditions, namely a continuous noise ...


3

Citing Muller et al’s, (1955) work on electronic displays, Eastman Kodak’s (1983) Ergonomics Design for People at Work states that people can discriminate 24 different absolute angles of inclination under optimum viewing conditions. This implies that an angle of 360/24 = 15 degrees can be readily classified as inclined rather than flat. However, I’d say 15 ...



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