Hot answers tagged

14

Perhaps you're referring to Naomi Eisenberger's work on the neural basis of social pain. Her seminal paper found that the neural correlates of distress from social rejection overlapped with those of physical pain, i.e., dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and anterior insula. She's recently published a literature review on social pain in the brain ...


10

The source I have quoted below gives an example of the following stenographic image:- Is this perception a particular trick that my eye performs or is it processing the visual data in an alternative way? Stereograms can be viewed as three-dimensional images by providing two side-by-side views of a three-dimensional scene, rendered from slightly ...


9

The Lateral Preference Inventory Coren (1993) developed an inventory for lateral preference (The Lateral Preference Inventory). Several items concerned ear preference. I found the choice of items to be quite interesting. See below for the items concerned with ear preference. Based on a large adult normative sample, a total score was created for the ...


7

Part of the difficulty in studying time perception is that memory is known to be biased by numerous factors including arousal and salience. So while people commonly report time slowing down during specific events, it is difficult to differentiate the effects of retroactive memory bias in encoding and recall from actual increased resolution in the perception ...


7

Can We Compare Subjective Experience? Consider this pain scale, variations of which are commonly used in medical settings: If two people answer "6 - distressing, miserable pain," can we reliably compare the subjective pain intensities between the two individuals? How would we know that one person's experience of "distressing, miserable pain" is the same ...


6

Psychophysiology is totally outside of my wheelhouse, but here it goes… Those feelings in your chest, face, arms, etc. aren't an illusion. Indeed, it's long been argued that physiological arousal (in your body) is a core component of emotional experience (e.g., James, 1884; Russell, 1980)--alongside feelings of pleasure and displeasure. Moreover, that ...


6

Short answer Damage to the inner ear can result in an asymmetric distortion in pitch perception between the two ears. This phenomenon can result in the same tone being perceived as a different pitch by the two ears. Background Damage to the inner ear (the cochlea) can lead to hearing loss. Hearing loss can sometimes lead to changes in perceived pitch. For ...


5

In general, subjective sensation increases linearly with the the log of physical intensity, which is described by Fechner's law. We are sensitive to small variations when light is dim, but we need large differences in intensity under conditions of high luminance (Weber's law). This is a linear relation, but taken together with Fechner these findings are ...


5

Assuming your question is "Is person's ego a projection of the responses of their amygdala onto the conscious experience?", I think it would translate to "Does the amygdala determines or houses the ego". In that light, the question hinges on the meaning of ego. Given the question is asked at Cognitive Sciences SE, I assume the ego is "The part of the mind ...


5

In general, evidence suggests that we are attracted to contrast rather than brightness (luminance). For example, the onset of a bright light on a dark background is often used as an exogenous cue for visual attention, but a dark cue on a bright background works just as well. So, signs generally aim to be high contrast against their background. Contrast shows ...


4

A human brain recognises letters by their constituent features (sub-letter parts). It is modelized by a pandemonium model where printed information is extracted locally then globally. In the letter recognition literature, this type of feature-based hierarchical model competes with template matching theories (with an advantage to the pandemonium-like models ...


4

As far as I know, there is just one article that explicitly mentions the generation of cross-modal qualia, i.e., visual qualia in response to tactile stimulation (Ortiz et al., 2011). Before continuing about this article I do wish to emphasize it is a single, isolated study that hasn't been supported by other studies at the time of this writing. Moreover, ...


4

I would read this paper, its mighty interesting. Books Snyder, B.(2000) Music and memory: An introduction. The MIT Press. Cambridge 291. Hemispheric Coordination and Conflict "...while listening to the melody of the popular carol "Silent Night", the right hemisphere thinks, "Ah, yes, Silent Night", while the left hemisphere thinks, "two sequences: ...


4

There is an interesting demonstration in this YouTube video (4:10 minutes) by Jean-Francoir Gariépy which shows a difference in the color perception depending on whether the dress is scanned from the top to the bottom of the image or vice versa. A conclusion from this could be that people scan pictures of dresses in different ways, although an ...


4

In psychology, we call people's attitudes towards things "preferences", and the emotional experience associated with preference is referred to as "affect", or more specifically, "valence", which is positive or negative. As eluded to in the question, there is a genetic predisposition for certain preferences, such as sugar (sweetness), and some aversions, ...


4

The phenomenon of not being able to visualise has recently been dubbed "aphantasia" by Adam Zeman at Exeter: see the university's press release Can’t count sheep? You could have aphantasia. They had a year-long project which finished a few days ago called The Eye's Mind to study people at both ends of the ability spectrum. One of their objectives is to ...


3

I can't zoom in on the picture, but what I see is bleeding from one color into the next along the diagonals (most evident in the green to blue and purple to red transitions). Are you saying that they are not there when you zoom in? I would think that because there is a gradient in the color transition, the gradient has to be emphasized in an angled meeting, ...


3

I don't think inverted prism goggles would be a satisfactory way to empirically test the thought experiment. A key axiom of the argument is that there are no physical changes to our brains or bodies; only the qualia have changed. In a goggles design, there would be a clear physical locus of the change (and we might reasonably call this part of your body for ...


3

The subliminal recollection is called involuntary memory retrieval. This triggers an implicit memory. Further reading: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subliminal_stimuli#Images http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subliminal_stimuli#Auditory_stimuli http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spreading_activation


3

This isn't exactly what you are referring to, but I think provides a similar function and has been shown in vertebrate vision: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Normalization_model Divisive normalization as a canonical computation across the brain While this does not implement histogram equalization, I think it is actually a better-suited explanation of the ...


2

As mentioned in the definitions section on page 2 of the paper, $D(q||p) = <ln(q/p)>_q$ is the Kullback-Leibler divergence or cross-entropy between two densities. The reason for the negative logs is that is the convention when discussing entropy in the context of information theory. This allows information to be combined additively. ...


2

Extensively. Most prominently, recently, by David Poeppel, Oded Ghitza and Anne-Lise Giraud, in a series of papers. They've, to be precise, mostly focused on MEG correlations with the filtered speech amplitude envelope. Areas around the auditory cortex track it fairly well it seems. There is still much debate about what this means and where it comes from, ...


2

The N170 (the face selective component of the brain) is commonly mapped indeed to OFA or FFA. It's trivial to find examples for this, e.g.: this, this, this, this, this. Many more studies can be found by searching the relevant data bases, e.g. like this. Some of these include co-registered EEG/fMRI or MEG. There is some uncertainty of where exactly it ...


2

Short answer "Perceptual competence" is "the ability to perceive". Background I Googled "perceptual competence" and the first hit was an open source article (Lencz et al., 2003). They define perceptual competence as: [The] initial representation of to-be-remembered material [in the context of working memory]. Perceptual competency itself can include ...


2

The symptoms belong to the Alice-in-Wonderland Syndrome, which is supposed to be very common in childhood. An interesting article appeared in the New York Times.


1

I believe an overactive amygdala certainly plays a pivitol role defines ones ego. As the amygdala is part of the limbic system. An overactive limbic system has been linked to depression, obsessive compulsive disorder and depression. While I do believe the amygdala does play a small part in defining the ego, I believe other parts of the limbic system, play ...


1

These are some of the common ways that psychologists use to test subjective experience: Introspection. Introspection has fallen a bit out of fashion after the hype surrounding mathematical psychology, but in some areas introspection still is a valid method, especially if other approaches are impossible or unethical. A famous psychological self-experiment ...


1

The root cause is almost certainly procreation. Our relationship tendencies developed along with our biology. Humans tend to have one child at a time, and human children mature very slowly. This suggests that during most of human history, it would be advantageous for a female to keep a male with her, helping to provide food and protection for herself and her ...


1

You have specifically asked about the "adaptations done by the brain" in your initial question and an interest in "what has been done towards finding the formula and what it was replaced with for the time being?" By formula, I'm assuming that you meant a perceptual algorithm that can be useful in machine learning and the attempt to reverse-engineer human's ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible