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9

Caveats Even when the degree of men's and women's desires to have children are forced by study parameters into yes/no pigeonholes, there are very few studies, and the results are arguably inconclusive. Also, men's and women's rates of desire to have children are continuously shifting, and thus the answer may change over time. Finally, the studies have been ...


8

Kramer et al 2008 is an excellent study of this question because it utilizes intervention, thus lending strength to the claim of causation, concluding that IQ was "significantly higher in the experimental group for both reading and writing". But is it the milk itself? Some argue that it's also the skin-to-skin contact, and the mother-child bonding. ...


8

Monozygotic twin studies are the general course of action for this kind of question. Genetic and environmental influences on multiple dimensions of religiosity: a twin study concludes there is a genetic component. A complete approach for these kind of studies is to take twins that have been separated to different households from birth and compare them to ...


8

The term "Oedipus complex" refers to a son's desire for his mother (very simplified). The corresponding construct, denoting the desire a daughter might feel for her father, is called the "Electra complex" (the term was introduced by C. G. Jung but rejected by Freud, so it does not really exist on the same level of fundamental concepts as the "Oedipus ...


7

There is quite a lot of research on parental favoritism. I'll summarize some of the findings: girls are more often parental favorites (Harris & Howard, 1985) women more often report parental favoritism (Chalfant, 1994) parents favor less aggressive children (which partially explains their preference for girls; Tucker et al., 2003) the youngest child is ...


6

This is an extremely interesting question. I'm going to take a different approach to the question by focusing on both personality traits and leadership theories (e.g. authentic leadership, transformational leadership, servant leadership etc) to answer whether those two distinct areas can influence leaders' children's development. I will admit that I didn't ...


5

Kohlberg constucted his stages of moral development using a sample consisting of 72 boys from Chicago. The sample consisted of three age groups: 10, 13 and 16 years. This was also the start for a 30-year long lasting longitudinal study to test his theory (Colby, Kohlberg, Gibbs & Lieberman, 1983). The results generally support the theory. Younger ...


5

Motherese may play a role in emotional development. Soken and Pick write: "Concurrent with the exaggerated speech of motherese, there are probably exaggerated facial displays, allowing infants to explore the particular aspects of the face... Child-centered displays may serve as opportunities for learning about affective events." Walker-Andrews (1997) also ...


5

I would like to point out impact of having kids. In typical case, kids have much greater impact on many levels of her life, than on his. I have seen more research on this topic, but now I found just a few examples Anne-Marie Nicot (2009) Impact of parenthood on careers of young men and women read - not original research Does having children create ...


4

I believe motherese exists to teach the infant to discriminate phonemes in the native language. Kuhl et al. (2005) show that during the first year language critical period, infants gain an increased ability to discriminate between phonemes of the native language, while their ability to discriminate between phonemes of non-native languages declines. ...


3

Fonagy and Target, although they do not specifically cite the term 'Motherese', believe that what they call 'Marking'- signalling an unreality or playfulness in mirrored displays of affect can play a crucial role in the development of a faculty they call 'Mentalization'. According to their model, newborns experience affect as all-pervading, and do not see ...


1

I have a feeling that many answers to your question will be influenced by anecdotes and personal parental style than actual research. A quick literature review suggests that there is evidence for both positive and negative influences of customary, nonabusive physical punishment, such as spanking. A literature review by Larzelere (2000) found that nine ...


1

yes it does have harmful effects on the children regardless of their age. may be children dont understand the words but the understands the emotions and expression behind the words. anger is a universal expression which can be understand by everyone regardless of age. showing anger or scolding contributes to stubbornness in children and it also induce ...



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