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10

Feeling as though you have seen a face before is perfectly normal. It may reflect actual similarities between the new face and the face you have seen before. There are people who genuinely look like each other, an example being celebrity look-a-likes. It may also reflect a commonly observed cultural/ethnic effect where people of a different ethnicity look ...


10

It is not widely thought that impaired function or destruction of the fusiform is sufficient to produce prosoganosia. It is currently widely held that face processing involves a network of regions in the occipital and temporal lobes (e.g., the occipital face area, posterior superior temporal sulus, anterior superior temporal sulus, anterior collateral ...


10

The frequency is individual, and known as tinnitus frequency or pitch. From Okamoto et al., 2010: Our target notched music introduced a functional deafferentation of auditory neurons corresponding to the eliminated frequency band, and because this frequency band overlapped the individual tinnitus frequency, the notched music no longer ...


9

There are many, many more neuromodulators in the brain than that. Essentially anything that binds to G-protein coupled receptors could be considered a neuromodulator. Even "classic" fast neurotransmitters like GABA and glutamate have "neuromodulatory" receptors (GABA-B receptors for GABA, 3 different families of "metabotropic glutamate receptors"). ...


7

I believe the answer lies in minicolumnar morphology in the neocortex. It's been shown that the minicolumns of autsitics and gifted individuals have narrower minicolumns, with greater spacing between each minicolumn. It's speculated that this creates an increased ability to distinguish percepts. Here is a paper on the topic: Casanova MF, Switala AE, Trippe ...


6

This is only one possible pathway. There are many potential ones. Further the fact that this is possible does not mean that it is the case always. Stress activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. For example, a meta-analysis by Dickerson et al. (2004) demonstrated that an acute laboratory based stressor reliably increased cortisol levels, ...


6

Although I find the concept of flow quite interesting, I'm not so sure about needing to invoke the flow state to explain motor enhancement from unrelated continuous movements. For example, one possible explanation for why continuous motion would improve learned movements like typing is that the motor cortex is typically used to model periodic movements as a ...


6

It’s probably best to ask clinicians since papers usually don’t go into very specific details about patient interactions, but in general this is what I can conclude based on a bit of research. Neglect often co-occurs with other impairments as there can be a range of causes (such as stroke) arising from damage to various brain structures; so it should be ...


5

Yes, though not necessarily in the way that you are meaning - some prosopagnosics will have damage to the area in question, so you could say the activity is lower because there is not much left of it! Quick google reveals this paper: http://cercor.oxfordjournals.org/content/20/8/1878.abstract It's recent so will probably review the evidence you are ...


4

I personaly also play piano and see myself into that flow easly, Check out what I just found From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flow_(psychology) Flow is the mental state of operation in which a person performing an activity is fully immersed in a feeling of energized focus, full involvement, and enjoyment in the process of the activity. In ...


4

Yes, the effects of electromagnetic fields on the brain have been studied extensively, especially with respect to cellphone, WiFi, and other small devices that emit such fields. The results are typically mixed, but the overall consensus is that "it depends" - on the strength of the field, the environment, length of exposure, etc - and most modern consumer ...


4

I think this is an interesting, but difficult question to answer. Hemispatial neglect patients do not typically have problem with visual pathways per se. Wikipedia suggests that the disorder is most closely linked to damage of the temporo-parietal junction and posterior parietal cortex, areas associated with attention. Thus, the sensation (e.g. on the ...


3

This is a very broad question. I'll simplify greatly. Like most systems, the brain regulates it's moment-to-moment energy needs through control of it's vascular supply. While the vascular supply (to the heart and brain) is regulated (by both baroreceptors and other) to protect against decreased blood flow (that is, the heart and the brain will be ...


3

I don't know much about this, but here are a few review articles (see here for more) that you could look at: Heilman, K. M., & Valenstein, E. (1979). Mechanisms underlying hemispatial neglect. Annals of Neurology, 5(2), 166-170. http://www.arts.uwaterloo.ca/~raha/CogSci600_web/Readings/Danckert3.pdf Parton, A., Malhotra, P., & Husain, M. (2004). ...


3

The best thing you can do is avoid nutritional deficiencies and exercise. In general, it's the same as for the rest of the body. Many people have subtle nutritional deficiencies that they may never know about their whole life just based on eating habits. As Chuck Sherrington said, neurotransmitter-based treatments are subject to homeostatic compensation, ...


3

There are many who will tell you authoritatively that a disease is acquired (e.g. infection, cancer, etc.) whereas disorder is something curable or genetic. These are imprecise and untrue. Basically a disturbance in normal functioning can be either a disorder or a disease, regardless of it's curability or method of acquisition. From your link, the second ...


3

Cognitive sciences are an interdisciplinary field between: psychology sociology philosophy medical sciences biology physics chemistry palaeontology / anthropology ethnology information sciences linguistics I believe I forgot something The core is probably somewhere around psychology, neurobiology (including endocrinology) and artificial intelligence, ...


2

Stam et al. have carried out a functional connectivity study in patients with Alzheimer's Disease. I don't know if that answers your question at all. Connectomics is just starting to kick off. It's far from certain that they it will end up being a key player in functional neuropathology in the coming decades, but it's one out of many promising new avenues of ...


2

Dopamine receptor agonists related to reckless driving and gambling There are three case reports provided by Reactions Weekly (2010) demonstrating correlations between treatment with dopamine receptor agonists and reckless driving: Reckless driving occurred in three patients during treatment with dopamine receptor agonists (DA) ... DA are associated ...


1

Apoptosis is the programmed death of a cell. This is not required for pruning of connections. During development, axons and dendrites of neurons undergo extensive lengthening, branching and also retraction. Simultaneous with this process, many many synapses are being constructed and deconstructed between axons and nearby dendrites. Also during adulthood, ...


1

The Oxford English Dictionary lists the following definitions: disease, n. 1 Absence of ease; uneasiness, discomfort; inconvenience, annoyance; disquiet, disturbance; trouble. (For long Obs. but revived in modern use with the spelling dis-ease.) 2 A condition of the body, or of some part or organ of the body, in which its functions are ...



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