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17

Yes! Recent work using fMRI has shown that subjects can indeed control localized brain regions through practice [1]. Some regions that have been tested include the rostal ACC [2] responsible for pain perception, PPA responsible for representing locations, and FFA responsible for representing faces. Repeated experiments seem to suggest the phenomenon is ...


12

It's unclear whether follow-up tests were ever performed on Lorber's patients, and in particular the student referenced by Lewin. Patient confidentiality precludes a systematic search of the literature, particularly because the Lewin (1980) article does not provide a pseudonym with which we can use to track the patient (e.g. "HM"). It is possible that this ...


10

It is not widely thought that impaired function or destruction of the fusiform is sufficient to produce prosoganosia. It is currently widely held that face processing involves a network of regions in the occipital and temporal lobes (e.g., the occipital face area, posterior superior temporal sulus, anterior superior temporal sulus, anterior collateral ...


10

The MTL consists of (note that some structures overlap): cortical areas, which can be categorized in at least three ways: portions of two gyri entire parahippocampal gyrus anterior medial side of fusiform gyrus five named cortical areas: perirhinal cortex parahippocampal cortex (see parahippocampal gyrus) entorhinal cortex presubiculum* parasubiculum* ...


9

Yes and no. Source estimation has been utilized in electrical engineering for decades, but is becoming more and more prevalent in the EEG realm, especially in light of efforts to register EEG readings with concurrent fMRI studies. Basically, given a set of EEG (or even MEG, magnetoencephalographic) measurements, can we "invert" them to find the individual ...


7

There is no better way to describe brain activity than brain waves! :) There are newer ways to analyze and think about brain waves, though. Usually you will find these under literature on neuronal oscillations. Good aspects of thinking about brain activity using brain waves: Brain waves are directly related to neural activity. They are an electric or ...


7

A minor addition to Jeff: There are ongoing researchs on controlling brain's response (e.g amygdala) to negative situations and using this techniques for psychiatric interventions (e.g. for anxiety disorders, depression). [1] There are different possibilities for learning adaptive coping strategies with simple, stuctured biofeedback training setups. But ...


6

This is a complicated and loaded question. As Neuroskeptic noted, our understanding of consciousness is very poor (in fact, we don't know how to define it most of the time). To see some of the best current definitions, take a look at: What are current neuronal explanations and models of 'consciousness'? We definitely can't infer arbitrary properties of ...


6

The easiest way to get an fMRI (and many other brain) scan is to volunteer to be a participant at your local university, hospital, or research center. They will let you keep a picture of your brain, provide some interesting information at de-briefing, and usually even give a bit of monetary compensation for your time. Since the research group has to have an ...


6

Resonance methods can be used to measure neurotransmitter levels. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy can measure the levels of a large number of neurotransmitters. However, this has always been viewed as a fairly static measure of neurotransmitter levels, and so has not been widely used as a measure of neural activity. However, Paul Mullins at Bangor University ...


6

Not only can brain activation be controlled though consciousness (which is expected under most reductionist accounts of the mind-brain problem) and measured in the lab (as @Jeff's answer showed) but it can actually be used as an interface! Erik Ramsey is locked-in syndrome patient and is incapable of movement apart from his eyes. However, he has control of ...


5

It's a bit of an art, currently. Following is one technique I witnessed in a lab that takes electrophysiological recordings of tadpole and rat neurvous sytems. The lab that I worked with entrains the neuron, recording it's electrical activity (in a series of drug tests) and injects a marker that goes into the neuron (a GFP-like protein that binds to ...


5

I'm surprised that no one has mentioned spiking activity. The spatial and temporal resolutions are phenomenal. The technology to record action potentials simultaneously from many neurons over many cortical areas is growing. Much of theoretical neuroscience deals with how those patterns of spiking convey information. As with the other answers, I will add ...


5

Have you tried: connectomeviewer http://www.connectomeviewer.org/viewer brainnetviewer http://www.nitrc.org/projects/bnv/ which is a toolbox for the SPM software package http://www.fil.ion.ucl.ac.uk/spm/ Gephi http://gephi.org/ Trackvis http://trackvis.org/ Also Nico Dosenbach has some amazing picture of brain connectivity in this paper ...


5

I found an example of a system that researchers are aiming to use in the future for determining the level of neurotransmitter activity in the brain using MRI. You were on the right track with the utility of hemoglobin. The molecule used is somewhat similar. To understand how the probes were generated requires a bit of a biological detour. There are ...


5

Yes, though not necessarily in the way that you are meaning - some prosopagnosics will have damage to the area in question, so you could say the activity is lower because there is not much left of it! Quick google reveals this paper: http://cercor.oxfordjournals.org/content/20/8/1878.abstract It's recent so will probably review the evidence you are ...


4

This question gets close to something that might alternatively be posted to stats.stackoverflow.com. Personally, I've always felt that application of Null-Hypothesis Significance Testing (NHST) methods to neuroimaging data does a particularly good job of highlighting their scientific deficiencies. Personally, these days I'd use Generalized Additive ...


4

Michelle Heijblom's (2009) master thesis on Visualising tinnitus with fMRI and EEG mentions the following: Different studies report that tinnitus is characterised by an increase in slow-wave activity (0.5- 4Hz: delta activity) and a decrease in alpha activity (8-12 Hz) at temporal regions. Recently it has been suggested that this loss of alpha ...


3

http://sccn.ucsd.edu/eeglab/ http://chronux.org are two libraries with tons of functions for analyzing eeg and emg data


3

Great question! To start, you are absolutely right-- a 1997 article on fMRI is considered very old as far as the field is concerned. Statistical techniques have improved dramatically since then so, while I haven't read the article in question, it's safe to assume that there are probably lots of things they would do differently if the study was conducted ...


2

Answering to my own question: Avogadro is a molecule editor, but for visualization purposes it does not check the validity of the molecule, thus permitting its usage in the creation of publication-quality 3D ball-and-stick models of any subject matter, such as brain connectivity networks. Avogadro reads several molecule file formats, for example .cml is an ...


2

I'm not an expert in neuroimaging, so I had to search a little bit to learn about how carry-over designs apply to fMRI (I found Aguirre, 2007). Thus, feel free to correct me if there is something specific about this problem domain that influences the correct answer to this question. However, based on general principles of experimental design of repeated ...


2

Firstly, you wouldn't be directly controlling neurotransmitter. From the human perspective, you'd be controlling higher-level events (and they aren't necessarily describable on more than a phenomenological level). Of course, this would also lead to some changes in neurotransmitter release, but in a complex way: that's all handled at a lower level by the ...


2

Totally out of my league here, but judging from a quick Google search, this seems to be a common problem in FSL. You've said this YouTube video helps, so that's good...but since it uses an applescript, I suppose it requires the Mac OS. You say Freesurfer's mri_convert works in Linux using this code: mri_convert --in_orientation [file's current storage ...


2

Complexity. That is, the fundamental laws governing the behavior isn't terribly difficult to comprehend or model. However, putting it all together and hoping it reproduces the correct behavior is a great challenge. Once you develop a model that has the appropriate underlying mechanisms in it's components, you still have to put them all together and ...


1

Bearing in mind the fact that I can't prove a negative, I'm going to say "No, it's not (yet) possible". Flow is rather loosely defined (e.g. "merging of action and awareness"), so coming up with hard measures is a challenge in and of itself -- even without bringing electrophysiology into the equasion. As a Positive Psychology concept, it belongs to the ...


1

T2 weighted MRI scans can reveal white matter lesions, so that may explain the detection of demyelination. Of course, that's not fMRI...



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