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what has always puzzled me is the neurobiological basis that gives rise to the phenomenon that we associate our bodies with ourselves – i.e., why does my brain think of my physical body as "me" and make me care for it? In other words, why is me me at this particular point in time and not some other body living e.g. centuries ago? Why do I not ...


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This is partially an aspect of the binding problem. Sensory information arrives in parallel as a variety of heterogeneous hints, (shapes, colors, motions, smells and sounds) encoded in partly modular systems. Typically many objects are present at once. The result is an urgent case of what has been labelled the binding problem. We must collect the hints, ...


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Apoptosis is the programmed death of a cell. This is not required for pruning of connections. During development, axons and dendrites of neurons undergo extensive lengthening, branching and also retraction. Simultaneous with this process, many many synapses are being constructed and deconstructed between axons and nearby dendrites. Also during adulthood, ...


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Modern neuroscience has left behind the notion of mind-brain separation. Neuroscientists typically accept that everything from our breathing to our emotions and the complex sense of "self" that we have is a product of our brains. We have yet to discover exactly how/when/why the "mind" emerged from the brain, but we do know that most of our mental processing ...


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Point by point: The Melon headband has three electrodes. Our primary electrode is on the forehead region known as FP1, where Melon can monitor brainwave activity from the prefrontal cortex. The problem with this is that electricity doesn't work like that. Current always flows between two points, and our electrodes measure the potential between two ...


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This type of sensor is hardly revolutionary, it seems that the integration and miniaturization are the key differences between say Melon, or this, or a 7-point sensor such as Muse, which supposedly monitors alpha and beta waves, and is already in production. Note that the 10/20 System is as old as I am: 30+ years. Additionally, it is an analog, dumb device, ...


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It's hard to say just, because it depends on the location of the head injury and how severe the head injury is. The brain is composed of several lobes which all have a different functions. Depending on the location and severity of the brain injury, the symptoms show up. For example, when you get brain injury in the frontal cortex, and this is severe enough, ...


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I was interested in the same question a while ago. Unfortunately, Witelson et al (1999) reported here (http://penthai.sc.mahidol.ac.th/html/articles/newsletter/paper3.pdf) that volume measurements haven't been taken at the time. Weight data is available, but weight and volume aren't correlated perfectly. Witelson, S. F., Kigar, D. L., & Harvey, T. ...


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The human neocortex contains approximately 1.5x10^14 synapses, connecting its 19–23 billion neurons. Source: Pakkenberg, B., Pelvig, D., Marner, L., Bundgaard, M. J., Gundersen, H. J. G., Nyengaard, J. R., & Regeur, L. (2003). Aging and the human neocortex. Experimental Gerontology, 38(1-2), 95-99. doi:10.1016/S0531-5565(02)00151-1


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Firstly, we need to draw the difference between a need and a belief. Needs are what everybody really wants, and beliefs are the vehicles which people meet those needs. For example, everybody has a need to feel significant or unique, but the way that person goes about doing that is based on their beliefs. To some people, robbing a bank in their mind will ...



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