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1

First, you need to keep in mind that what one would consider "random" might not be "random" for another person. On one extreme, some scientists believe the brain is operating essentially deterministically (thermal/quantum noise is too small), that is, if you know the "precise" state of the brain and its environment, you can predict its future states for a ...


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You could start with Hochner's papers, like this one: Hochner, B., Shomrat, T., & Fiorito, G. (2006). The octopus: a model for a comparative analysis of the evolution of learning and memory mechanisms. The Biological Bulletin, 210(3), 308-317. http://www.biolbull.org/content/210/3/308.full As far as I know, he is a world expert.


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Part of the difficulty in studying time perception is that memory is known to be biased by numerous factors including arousal and salience. So while people commonly report time slowing down during specific events, it is difficult to differentiate the effects of retroactive memory bias in encoding and recall from actual increased resolution in the perception ...


0

i havent read this, but a search for "retina plasticity" brings up this, which should answer your question. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780123708809004072 I used the search term "plasticity" because that refers to the ability of the nervous system to change itself, of which learning is a subset.


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It is very very important to note that in the brain, most neurons are receiving input from way more excitatory synapses than necessary to bring the neuron to threshold. The thing is that they are also receiving input from a huge number of inhibitory synapses as well. This means that it is not how many inputs that are active at a given time that determines ...


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While model neurons like the leaky integrate and fire may use a simplification in which the neuron forgets all previous information when it emits a spike, in a biological neuron, the synapse and the soma are relatively electrically isolated from each other, so the voltage activity of the action potential does not make the synapse "forget" the EPSP. Although ...


3

It's probably more accurate to say that it's more difficult to fall asleep in the light because the circadian rhythm is directly regulated by ambient light. Our retinas contain a small amount of cells specialized for detecting ambient light levels, and these are directly connected to the brain center which controls the circadian rhythm. As our eyelids don't ...


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As the Myers Briggs is not particularly valued among personality researchers (see here, for example), it is unlikely that you will find research explicitly focusing on this question. However, the MBTI types Judging (and its counterpart Perceiving) have been shown to overlap with the Big Five personality dimension conscientiousness (Judging = more ...


3

The general biological term for this kind of mechanism is synaptic plasticity. Synapses are the biological structure that allow neurons to communicate via the exchange of neurotransmitters. The strength of the synapse (the effectiveness of the link between the neurons) can be modified over time. One important kind of modification is long-term potentiation, ...



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