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5

This is partially an aspect of the binding problem. Sensory information arrives in parallel as a variety of heterogeneous hints, (shapes, colors, motions, smells and sounds) encoded in partly modular systems. Typically many objects are present at once. The result is an urgent case of what has been labelled the binding problem. We must collect the hints, ...


4

It is highly variable, depending on the strength and placement of the synapse (which in turn depends on synapse activity and how often the two neurons fire together, among other things). The wikipedia page here is a pretty good place to start, or if you want more detail on how that pulls together in an actual system, this paper is a good place to start.


3

what has always puzzled me is the neurobiological basis that gives rise to the phenomenon that we associate our bodies with ourselves – i.e., why does my brain think of my physical body as "me" and make me care for it? In other words, why is me me at this particular point in time and not some other body living e.g. centuries ago? Why do I not ...


2

There is a basic epistemological problem here that was only touched upon by Chuck Sherrington - everyone is making the assumption that the brain processes the same kind of information as a digital computer. There is no real evidence to suggest that it does, in fact. A digital computer is an instantiation of a Turing machine, which is equivalent to certain ...


1

Donald Hebb originally formulated what would later come to be known as spike-time dependent plasticity by famously stating "neurons that fire together wire together". In actuality, the firing has to be sequential (not simultaneous) and causal: if a neuron A fires and causes B to consequently fire, the synaptic strength between them increases. This is how the ...


1

First at all, the connectome must be interpreted like a static picture of the brain. So anything related with plasticity and dynamical processes will be lost in this map. There are connectome at macroscopic areas using fNMR but I'm going to focus in the cellular level. We can define three types: Dense Connectome - It is the classical idea of connectome ...


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Very detailed estimates for almost all of your points, for cat, can be found in Binzegger, T., Douglas, R. J., & Martin, K. A. C. (2004). A quantitative map of the circuit of cat primary cortex. Journal of Neuroscience, 24(39), 8441-8453.


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Apoptosis is the programmed death of a cell. This is not required for pruning of connections. During development, axons and dendrites of neurons undergo extensive lengthening, branching and also retraction. Simultaneous with this process, many many synapses are being constructed and deconstructed between axons and nearby dendrites. Also during adulthood, ...


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Modern neuroscience has left behind the notion of mind-brain separation. Neuroscientists typically accept that everything from our breathing to our emotions and the complex sense of "self" that we have is a product of our brains. We have yet to discover exactly how/when/why the "mind" emerged from the brain, but we do know that most of our mental processing ...



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