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4

I think you should reverse your approach. Rather than trying to find every prerequisite, start reading sections of PNS and as you encounter something you don't understand, look up the background information. It's an exhaustive work (and well worth reading!) but you're going to find different sections require different levels of background. For example, ...


3

I don't think measuring serum cortisol levels would be a great method of testing for stress. It is expensive, painful, and the results are difficult to interpret. Salivary levels might be better, but this would also be expensive. To actually determine the effect of stress on cortisol levels, you would need to control for variables including (but not ...


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has made it possible to have perfect input/output to the brain from a computer Perfect? Definitely not: the complexities of optogenetics of a single mm square of cortex, of a mouse lets say, are extremely complex. As Chuck mentions, many neurons/synapses may be activated by a single LASER and current technologies allow only a few different LASER ...


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Donald Hebb's postulate only applies when two neurons are already connected. It seems you are asking more specifically, 'when two neurons are not already connected and they want to connect, how and why?' Correct? In this case, we do not know. StrangeLoop mentions it is due to the location of the neurons and the spreading of activation. Yes these might be ...


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I was wondering what happens if we lose all electrical impulses in our nervous system for a minimum amount of time... if we have a complete elec. blackout, is our memory erased? Or is our consciousness based soly on the synapsis in our brain and does not care about the electrical state? If "we" includes other animals down to frogs, then the answer ...


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Basic concepts of biochemistry and some knowledge of general biology (mainly, general cytology) are sufficient (Chem1A and Bio1A would be fine); some specific chapter requires a little more advanced knowledge of molecular biology and human physiology, but nothing "over the top".


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Mania and nymphomania are related in the same way that nut and donut are. In other words: don't let a partial homophony or possible common etymology fool you. A mania is a psychiatric disorder that appears to be caused by overactivity of certain brain processes. Nymphomania is currently not a recognized disorder in the DSM. It is, in the ICD-10 ...


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::: It seems like you're trying to get to the root cause as either organic or functional? Maybe a bit of both. They jury will forever be out thus we have the stress-diathesis model for comfort. Here is some interesting discussion on the norm-referencing in assessment of manic behavior such as hypersexuality and the implications of various factors like ...


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Short answer: current evidence is unclear. Learning As Contrarian mentions, formation of a synapse does not always mean 'learning' as synapses are formed and eliminated all the time, however -- both -- formation and elimination have been found to be linked with learning (interestingly the same spines that are 'learnted' can be 'unlearnted'). So in this ...


1

Anology Taking the analogy and calculations directly, you are assuming that the fundamental computing unit of the brain is the neuron; we do not know if this is true. It could be a cortical column, a group of several neurons, the neuron, a dendritic branch (a fascinating review paper!), a synapse, receptors or neurotransmitter vesicles (how about glial ...


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The following comes from my research experience using fMRI to study the human visual system. Overall, peoples brains are similar to each other on higher scales, and become very different from each other as the scale becomes smaller. Differences between different people start with brain size and sulci patterns. Also male and female brain anatomies will be ...



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