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5

I'm not sure the math checks out in the question (the CPU cycles per second seems awfully high), but I think there are some useful principles to keep in mind regardless of the details of the math. So let's assume that we do have a computer that can perform more operations per second than the combined sum of all action potentials in the brain per second. Is ...


5

Have you ever seen IBM's Watson? Watson is composed of a cluster of ninety IBM Power 750 servers, each of which uses a 3.5 GHz POWER7 eight core processor, with four threads per core. In total, the system has 2,880 POWER7 processor cores and has 16 terabytes of RAM. It must be kept in a (very) large refrigerated room. Watson is a question answering (QA) ...


4

I will just show the statistics of last attempt to mimic the brain process. Last year Japan launched there fastest supercomputer: K computer OR SPARC64 VIIIfx 2.0GHz Features: Manufacturer: Fujitsu Cores: 705,024 Linpack Performance (Rmax) 10,510 TFlop/s Theoretical Peak (Rpeak) 11,280.4 TFlop/s Power: 12,659.89 kW Memory: 1,410,048 GB ...


4

As you have already hinted at, the issue is controversial. I could leave it at that and say "no, there is no consensus", and it would be a true answer, but it wouldn't be satisfying, wouldn't it? Instead, I'll briefly define the topic, give a few examples, and then a few recent criticisms. My answer will be weighted somewhat towards "cognition" instead of ...


3

Your information is basically sound. Serotonin and dopamine are both neurotransmittors that are connected, in different ways, with positive feelings or elevated mood. The buzzword for dopamine (in this context, as it has many functions) is "reward" - the presence of dopamine in the brain modulates the feeling of satisfaction from achievement, and encourages ...


2

There are many who will tell you authoritatively that a disease is acquired (e.g. infection, cancer, etc.) whereas disorder is something curable or genetic. These are imprecise and untrue. Basically a disturbance in normal functioning can be either a disorder or a disease, regardless of it's curability or method of acquisition. From your link, the second ...


2

Complexity. That is, the fundamental laws governing the behavior isn't terribly difficult to comprehend or model. However, putting it all together and hoping it reproduces the correct behavior is a great challenge. Once you develop a model that has the appropriate underlying mechanisms in it's components, you still have to put them all together and ...


1

You've received a few great comments from our neuroscience-savvy users that indicate ways in which this question can be construed as particularly challenging or maybe even unanswerable. However, I think there's a much more basic and limited understanding of your question that takes into account your self-professed unfamiliarity with neuropharmacology and ...


1

"Jung had the notion of an archetype, a universally known symbol." Archetypes and symbols are two different things. Jacobi explains it in her excellent book, Complex Archetype Symbol in the Psychology of C. G. Jung. "there is a lot of evidence that he viewed archetypes as innate predispositions with an organizing function" I'd like to see that "evidence". ...


1

The Oxford English Dictionary lists the following definitions: disease, n. 1 Absence of ease; uneasiness, discomfort; inconvenience, annoyance; disquiet, disturbance; trouble. (For long Obs. but revived in modern use with the spelling dis-ease.) 2 A condition of the body, or of some part or organ of the body, in which its functions are ...


1

This is only a partial answer (since the question scope is so large) but it is one of my favorite empirical findings. It turns out that simply watching your favorite team win or lose has physiological impacts. Specifically, if a team you are rooting for wins, your testosterone levels will increase, and they will decrease if your team loses. This was ...



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