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We cover a discussion on this in an article we've submitted for peer-review. Here is the preprint. I will cite this stackExchange question/answers in the manuscript (post peer review now) as there are some lovely discussions going on, and doubtless, more to follow. Tangentially relevant to this discussion is a simulation we did in the paper exploring how ...


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It is difficult to overstate the extent to which analysis of variance-based linear modeling based for different groups dominates the cognitive sciences. A recent methodological review of the psychology literature suggesting that these analyses are used to test hypotheses in as much as 95% of studies (citation pending me recovering it). There are alternatives ...


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Note: This is not intended to set a verbosity standard for answers, but to give a comprehensive example of what kind of information I am looking in order to further clarify the question. An answer including only a parallel of the principles of ecological psychology subsection would be sufficient, for example. Ecological psychology Ecological Psychology ...


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Ethics of Feedback: The APA's code of ethics (2010) as well as the Advisory Group on Conducting Research on the Internet (AGCRI) report (2004) summarize ethical issues related to conducting offline and online psychological research. Feedback is normal in psychological experiments, and researchers are encouraged to debrief participants, before, immediately ...


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There are no known domain-general ways of formulating good questions and problems—what constitutes a good question or problem formulation depends on the field or domain. A good psychology question is different from a good literary question, which in turn is different from a good business question. Because there are no known domain-independent ways of ...


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Short version: A question is possible to answer sociologically if and only if its scale and region (informally speaking, its context) are completely defined and its variables of interest are operationalized. Long (really long) version: The following answer may be colored by my quantitative background, but if you give me the benefit of the doubt here and ...


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Researchers are often willing to share their stimuli. If you know of a paper that uses the same kind of stimuli that you want to use, you could try emailing the authors. A friendly request with a brief explanation of why you want the stimuli usually works.


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It's important to distinguish between measures and analyses, because only analyses can be quantitative or qualitative, not measures. Measures are, essentially, systematic processes by which we acquire our data, and analyses are processes we use to look at the data. As a rule of thumb, the difference is not hard to find and is given in the name: ...


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ANOVA and t-tests are statistical tests for significance and therefore quantitative. The other mentioned items are scales (adding numbers to a certain choice) and therefore they can be considered as ordinal scales, and hence as quantitative as they are based on numbers. The NASA one can be administered by using a sliding scale which can be considered to ...



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