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There is a program called Paradigm that allows you to build millisecond-accurate neurocognitive experiments for iOS devices. The experiment builder is like E-Prime but easier to use. The app is available in the app store. You upload your experiments to a Dropbox and then log in to access them through the app. It's pretty flexible. I've used it to build ...


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Without knowing exactly what the factor you are interested in is, it is hard to predict how feasible it would be to manipulate it. For example, is it possible to make two videos of the speaker, one with the factor, and one without, with nothing else changing? My guess is that you probably can't do this, so I'm going to focus on how you might be able to run ...


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I see you want to measure reactions based on viewing a clip by demographics. How do I quantify how upset, uncomfortable, aggravated or displeased the subject felt? You quantify it by gathering hard data: heart rate, blood pressure, pupil dilation (if you can get it in the video), and whatever other similar experiments have measured. You have a ...


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Polygraph-style measurements might be useful to get some hard data - emotional excitement and stress have biological effects, and measuring+recording heart rate and blood pressure can be done rather simply. For qualitative analysis, it would be useful to capture as much as you can of the experiment - e.g. a video recording of the face to analyse expression ...


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We are far from having any standards on the topic of emotions, and there are numerous ways to gather a user's emotional feedback. Of course, there is no optimal solution, and the choice mostly depends of your protocol requirements and expectations. Using emotional terms, for instance, might be limited, as there is a bias of common understanding by every ...


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There are a range of "adjective checklists" that have been developed to assess affective states, personality traits, or characteristics of individuals. Two of the most widely cited measures are the Multiple Affective Adjective Check List (MAACL) and the Multiple Affective Adjective Checklist-Revised (MAACL-R) (Zuckerman & Lubin, 1965; Zuckerman & ...



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