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Sites: The social psychology network has a page for posting online social psychology studies. There are a range of requirements. In particular, it needs to be closely related to social or personality psychology. SampleSize Subreddit is a community dedicated to completing surveys. They like it when results will be provided at study completion. It has close ...


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The primary difference is two-fold: 1) Methods : Social sciences use mostly qualitative methods and content analysis, psychology and cognitive sciences use quantitative methods and statistical analysis. The one basic standard tool in psychology and cognitive sciences is the laboratory experiment, while social sciences usually collect data in the field. 2) ...


6

Experimental psychologists seem quite happy working with single item ad hoc self-report scales, physiological measures, etc. with very little psychometrical assessment so even before talking about a full-fledged latent variable modeling approach, confirmatory factor analysis and the like you might want to wonder why they appear relatively unconcerned with ...


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In Germany, most students and many researchers conduct their online surveys using the portals soscisurvey.de and unipark.info. Soscisurvey.de includes a so-called "panel", a pool of currently more than 100.000 persons interested in partaking in surveys. To use the panel, you do not have to host your survey on soscisurvey.de, but you must apply a month in ...


6

Does the locking refer to the initiation of the measurement with starting cue being being the presentation of stimulus or the response of the subject? More or less, yes. When measuring brain activity, you usually make a long, continuous recording during which you expose your study participants to a task over and over again. There's a lot of noise ...


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The study design sounds pretty good. Some of the good things you are proposing: Using a repeated measures design will give you more statistical power than a between subjects design, which is particularly useful when your sample size is small. Randomising or counterbalancing for order should mostly control for order effects. Double blind will focus the ...


5

How many trials do you have per condition? With a small number of trials in the deviant condition, and a small number of participants, these things can happen. The ISI would not cause this per se, however, have you considered looking at effects of the previous trial? You can analyze the baseline intervals as a function of what type the previous trial was, ...


5

Murphy & Cleveland (1995) mention, that a good way to reduce rater errors in general is to inform raters of the existence and nature of these errors and then to simply urge to avoid them. While this reduces rater errors, it also decreases the accuracy of ratings, though. These findings come from the literature on performance assessment, where halo is ...


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It's an interesting question. Here are a bunch of thoughts that came to my mind for why researchers might focus on observed variables. Many researchers report reliability and observed relationships between variables. By adopting a few assumptions, the reader can estimate what the latent relationships would be (see for example, the formula for correction of ...


5

I'll address just the first of your three sub-questions, the others have been answered by Chuck Sherrington. What does it mean when you get two or more Mechanical Turk participants in a study with the same IP address? IP addresses are rarely "fixed" to an individual computer. Each provider has a range of IP addresses available and assigns them to ...


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First off, what button-box you use is going to be influenced by what software you're using to run the experiment, so ideally you should specify that. The PST serial response box is probably the industry standard, and is what we have in my lab, although a lot of that is probably down to it coming from the makers of EPrime. EPrime doesn't work on OSX ...


4

Since this is a relatively new problem for behavioral researchers, I don't know that there is a common consensus. I found two articles, one of which was a study that had used crowdsourcing for medical pictograms. Their approach was as follows: First, we checked for duplicate records. After sorting the data by participants’ IP addresses, we found ...


4

Okay, let's see if I can tackle this... Almost all of my answer to this question is being drawn from the first chapter of Michael Posner's Foundations of Cognitive Science. I, myself, am just a rising freshman at a decently ranked American university who has been studying the cognitive science literature on my own for the last few years. Here I will ...


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Here are a few thoughts: Work out whether the construct has ceiling effects or whether it is a measurement issue: You need to consider whether people actually discriminate between the rated objects. Multiple items per rated object: For each medical treatment you could ask participants to answer several questions. You could then take the mean of their ...


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If n != m then it will not home in on the 50 % threshold. In these simple N-up/N-down staircases, you can modify either the stepsize (as you proposed) or the number of successes/failures to act as a criterion for upgrade/downgrade. A comprehensive introduction to these staircases and the effect of changing these properties can be found in this paper. The 80 ...


3

Presumably to have symbols with the same area but different shapes, you could do a little geometry to work out relevant angles and sides. Then in any reasonable drawing package you could draw the shapes and check that they have appropriate angles. Programming drawing packages might also make life easier, but I don't have much experience with these (e.g., ...


3

This is a very general answer to your question. And let me say upfront that I don't know about any measurement instruments for pleasure. However, I would like to emphasize that pleasure, just as about any psychological phenomenon, has to be considered a latent construct. What this means is that it cannot be measured directly, but only indirectly and ...


3

It's a little unclear what you're asking. In general, psychologists try to build models that are parsimonious; this often means only introducing new parameters (particularly free parameters) into a model when they are absolutely necessary. You are right that with a sufficient number of free parameters, one can build a model that fits the data perfectly. But ...


3

I'm currently working on a similar project and wanted to share some info. A recent paper reports a similar concern but also a solution via the iPad's built in mic. http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0057364 "The touch screen alone cannot be used for high temporal resolution measurements because of the inherent delay ...


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I get the impression that good journal editors will get at least one reviewer who is skilled in the methodology used in the paper. The importance of this reviewer role would presumably vary with the statistical or other methodological complexity of the paper. That said, reviewing is well known to be imperfect particularly when it comes to checking all the ...


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This does not really answer your question (because it doesn't deal in detail with methodological issues), but there is a nice journal article that deals with problems of the peer review process in general by evaluating "great scientific works of the past" from the perspective of current social sciences: Trafimov, D., & Rice, S. (2009). What if social ...


3

See this question on comparing scales with different response scales. In short, you have to do it with care. A good option for ensuring comparability is to get a sample of participants to provide responses on both response scales in order to see how they relate. This could then be used to create a conversion scale. More generally, there is a large debate ...


3

You may want to have a look at our 40 questions to date that use the statistics tag. These may demonstrate the complexity of our applications in statistics. Wikipedia also has an entire psychological statistics page that seems intended to index other pages on specific applications. Psychological experiments commonly test null hypotheses (e.g., $H_0$: the ...


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I'm still not clear on what is your question. You ask whether psychology and medicine differ in some aspect of their methodological approach. Experiments are typically analysed using statistics to test hypotheses. So those things all go together. Psychology and medicine both perform controlled experiments and observational studies. They both perform ...


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As mentioned in the other comments, ANOVA is problematic when mixing types of predictor variables. (Generalized) mixed effects models are gaining popularity these days and actually provide a very convenient way for modelling such things. A paper demonstrating the efficacy of this approach as well as giving a tutorial-like introduction is: Davidson, D. J. ...


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For an open source JavaScript/HTML/CSS solution, check out jsPsych: http://www.jspsych.org. It can be used for reaction time measurement and interactive designs. An article describing the library was recently published in Behavior Research Methods. de Leeuw, J. R. (2014). jsPsych: A JavaScript library for creating behavioral experiments in a Web browser. ...


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Disclaimer: I'm not generally doing experiments where reaction time is the primary DV. But I thought I'd look at this issue and explored RTs from a neuroimaging dataset, and I think the findings are relevant to the question. I think without further qualification, this question doesn't have an answer. Here I've plotted the estimation of reaction time/RT over ...


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The number of samples that are necessary for a good parameter estimation does indeed depend on the estimation method. I am not aware of a simple rule of thumb to determine an optimal sample size, but there has been a lot of literature on this topic. A paper that might be a good starting point for a literature search is Van Zandt T. (2000) How to fit a ...



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