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Just a few words on mnemonics before answering your question. I have been practicing for two years. First because I was impressed how easy it was to remember items using these techniques. My personal best time for learning the order of 52 cards is 1min40, which is not really good compared to real competitors, but the point is that practicing 30 min a day ...


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I just wanted to add to the current answers, that this idea of one element of a network results in the entire network becoming active (aka a smell triggers the memory) is thought of as a Hebbian cell assembly. Donald Hebb introduced the idea of "neurons that fire together, wire together". And with that in becomes easier to think of how one spark (for ...


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It really depends on the timing of the stressful event, as well as anticipation. From an evolutionary standpoint, "stress" developed for a reason in the context of heightened arousal, attention, preparation for action, etc. Say you encounter a lion in your backyard: Not only will your sympathetic nervous system be on full speed, but several cortices are also ...


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Not only it does, this phenomenon can be influenced by drugs. Beta-blockers increase memory function under stress, while reboxetine (an NRI antidepressant) actually decreases it! See eg. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16642355


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I can remember experiment where we (in faculty days) induced electro stimulation of middle pain and measure list of words and how much participants will rememember in group with electro stimulation and without it. group with not induced pain (or stress) remember more. Unfortunatelly I cant find research paper for that. Here is neuroscientific explanation ...


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I'm not sure if personal relevance of data has been studied directly, but this factor seems related to depth of processing [Wikipedia link A], which improves memory encoding. I'm not aware of any research on an interaction between depth of processing [Wikipedia link B] and whether learning is spaced (as an experimentally controlled variable). I hope others ...


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The search terms "gradual-interval recall" may give you another area to research. I found that in a blog posting about SRS https://medium.com/p/5481606b087a "In a paper on gradual-interval recall published by Paul Pimsleur in 1967, he hypothesizes the following intervals: 5 seconds, 25 seconds, 2 minutes, 10 minutes, 1 hour, 5 hours, 1 day, 5 ...


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Memories aren't static. And like any physical memory source, it has its own memorizing limits. So there are no permanent effects here. You can improve your memory capacity with different training methods, but effects decrease with time if you stop it, just like with muscles. There are also displacement and packing mechanisms that make you remember ...


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Depending on what you consider 'photographic memory', there is a documented psychological syndrome called 'hyperthymesia' or 'highly superior autobiographical memory'. People with this condition can recall mundane aspects of nearly every day of their lives, such as what shoes a stranger was wearing 20 years ago. It's not quite the same as what 'eidetic ...


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yes it is possible the perfect long-term visual storage of Stephen Wiltshire: The Human Camera http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a8YXZTlwTAU



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