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If you have a physics background, you may be particularly interested in Sparse Distributed Memory, a model that provides a number of psychologically plausible characteristics, and is also neuroscientifically plausible. The model and some of its characteristics are summarized in this paper. Many great references have been provided by Nick Stauner (and I ...


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"Jung had the notion of an archetype, a universally known symbol." Archetypes and symbols are two different things. Jacobi explains it in her excellent book, Complex Archetype Symbol in the Psychology of C. G. Jung. "there is a lot of evidence that he viewed archetypes as innate predispositions with an organizing function" I'd like to see that "evidence". ...


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Memory is a big word. Usually, neuroscientists and psychologists will try to model a specific cognitive process: for example, long-term recognition memory (the ability to distinguish between previously learned items and new items). Here is a link to a very good introductory text in computational neuroscience (which includes a section about memory and ...


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the cognitive skills of a human population have a great variance. I am more like your friend, with episodic memory below average but semantic memory above average. You seem to have episodic memory above average (I envy you on that, because a large part of our feeling of self identity depends on episodic memory). There are extreme cases of people that ...


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The remembering of specific events is known as Episodic memory, and you can find plenty about it online. It's usually contrasted with Semantic memory, which is generalized knowledge such as that "Paris is the capital of France". I'm going to leave it to other users, or myself at a later date, to provide additional references/explanation, but those are the ...


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The act of perceiving quantity without actually counting is known as subitizing, and it's something we can all do up to quantities of about 4 (i.e. you can tell how many fingers someone is holding up without counting them, right?). This open access article seems to review the idea quite nicely (although I've only skimmed it), including reference to so ...


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This is typical of a group of people that have what is properly known as savant syndrome. It is not limited to autistic people, although it is most prevalent among them. People that display these abilities are usually elevated on the autism scale, and have had some sort of traumatic brain injury or neurodevelopmental disorders. Unfortunately, the methods by ...



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