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Depending on what you consider 'photographic memory', there is a documented psychological syndrome called 'hyperthymesia' or 'highly superior autobiographical memory'. People with this condition can recall mundane aspects of nearly every day of their lives, such as what shoes a stranger was wearing 20 years ago. It's not quite the same as what 'eidetic ...


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Just a few words on mnemonics before answering your question. I have been practicing for two years. First because I was impressed how easy it was to remember items using these techniques. My personal best time for learning the order of 52 cards is 1min 40s, which is not really good compared to real competitors, but the point is that practicing 30min a day ...


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The brain structure for memory, association, learning and thinking works more like a network of weighted, linked nodes. in machine learning and related fields, artificial neural networks (ANNs) are computational models inspired by an animal's central nervous systems (in particular the brain) [...] Artificial neural networks are generally presented as ...


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This is what I do to store something in the long term memory. 1) Place it in the short term memory (those methods depend on the material). -Use mnemonic memory techniques. -Repeat the facts in different order. -Relate the facts to something that you already know. -Organize the facts in a logical order (order improves memory). -Try to find semantic meaning ...


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Learning is a very complex process, do not expect to find precise answers like “5 exercises are required to learn a new subject”. There are many factors that affect learning, just to name a few: Your existing knowledge. Your engagement with the subject. How you learn. Deep Vs shallow processing. The complexity of the subject. Your personal characteristics ...


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Memory in the brain isn't super-well understood, so going to the level of "data-structures" isn't really possible with purely biological models. Not that a purely biolgocial description would be very useful anyways. When people ask how the brain works, they typically don't want to be told "molecule A interacts with molecule B, which triggers molecule C". ...


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The search terms "gradual-interval recall" may give you another area to research. I found that in a blog posting about SRS https://medium.com/p/5481606b087a "In a paper on gradual-interval recall published by Paul Pimsleur in 1967, he hypothesizes the following intervals: 5 seconds, 25 seconds, 2 minutes, 10 minutes, 1 hour, 5 hours, 1 day, 5 ...


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I assume memories aren't static. And like any physical memory source, it has its own memorizing limits. So there are no permanent effects here. You can improve your memory capacity with different training methods, but effects decrease with time if you stop it, just like with muscles. There are also displacement and packing mechanisms that make you remember ...


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the cognitive skills of a human population have a great variance. I am more like your friend, with episodic memory below average but semantic memory above average. You seem to have episodic memory above average (I envy you on that, because a large part of our feeling of self identity depends on episodic memory). There are extreme cases of people that ...


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The remembering of specific events is known as Episodic memory, and you can find plenty about it online. It's usually contrasted with Semantic memory, which is generalized knowledge such as that "Paris is the capital of France". I'm going to leave it to other users, or myself at a later date, to provide additional references/explanation, but those are the ...


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The answer is episodic. Episodic memory is responsible for storing information about events (or episodes) we have experienced; whereas semantic is for storing information about the world, such as the meaning of words. While semantic memory would be required to understand and thus encode the words in the first place, remembering the list of words would ...


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Because memory is consolidated during sleep ( and dreaming) http://learnmem.cshlp.org/content/11/6/671.full http://psychcentral.com/news/2010/04/26/dreams-are-key-to-memory/13157.html there are also some psychological benefits from easyng painfull memories. http://newscenter.berkeley.edu/2011/11/23/dream-sleep/



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