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9

Well, I have some few memories of my very early childhood, but it is undisputable (and the articles quoted by PEEJWEJ don't dispute it either) that most children don't remember most things from their earliest years. The number of events that adults remember from their childhood, and the memory span of a child, clearly increases with the age of the child: ...


8

Just to add to Jens answer, opinion is still divided regarding whether memory is subserved by distinct systems, or is a distributed, emergent property of perceptual, navigational and semantic systems. Whereas patient data has always strongly implicated distinct memory systems (e.g., declarative vs non-declarative), multivariate fMRI studies have provided ...


7

I personally have had the experience that you can train your ability to hold a mental image of what you see. I have been drawing from life as a hobby off and on for more than twenty years, and one of the exercises that help you with learning to draw in a realistic manner is to look at your subject for several seconds and then turn to your canvas and draw ...


7

It seems this "fact" is becoming more debatable. This article and this article might clear up some misconceptions and confusion about this issue. It's incredibly difficult to say anything about memory that applies to all situations. Each person will remember different things for different lengths of time, but often it is not based on some aspect of ...


7

(1) There are different kinds of memory: a "sensory" (e.g. visual) memory of events as they happened a verbal memory, i.e. the knowledge that something has happened (verbalization being the result of higher cognitive processing or "reflection") a behavioral memory, i.e. a specific reaction to certain stimuli that does not appear in individuals that did not ...


7

No. I don't think so. There are many arguments for why this is not the case. A common understanding of human memory is that it is part of an information processing system: attention, sensation, perception, interpretation, memory consolidation, forgetting, and memory recall. In some sense all these represent possible points of failure. Thus, we can fail ...


7

I believe the answer lies in minicolumnar morphology in the neocortex. It's been shown that the minicolumns of autsitics and gifted individuals have narrower minicolumns, with greater spacing between each minicolumn. It's speculated that this creates an increased ability to distinguish percepts. Here is a paper on the topic: Casanova MF, Switala AE, Trippe ...


6

As far as your first question is concerned: It seems that you're interested in the distinction between declarative and nondeclarative forms of memory. These different forms of memory have also been termed knowing that and knowing how (Cohen & Squire, 1980) Nondeclarative memory, according to Squire (2004), is an umbrella term refering to Procedural ...


6

Suppose a person learns a subject in college and waits for 10 years before learning it again. An exam is given one week after the person relearns the subject. So in this case, the ISI (inter-study interval) is very long compared to the RI (retention interval). The person will definitely forget some of the material after the 10 years. So how long they would ...


6

As Chuck pointed out in the comments, it's important not to take a metaphor too literally. Comparing our memory to a mailbox may have some validity, it is not true that our memory can "fill up"-- i.e., that we have a limited capacity for knowledge in general. No matter how old or how many facts you have learned, you will always be capable of learning new ...


6

It sounds like you are interested in the Spacing Effect. A search on Google Scholar for "spacing effect" for articles published since the year 2000 yields over 2500 articles some of which might be worth pursuing. Perhaps you might want to start by having a read through the meta-analysis in Psychological Bulletin by Cepeda et al (2006). To quote the ...


5

There are individuals who possess extraordinary memory ability, sometimes called eidetic memory. With specific reference to your question, a woman in Los Angeles has an extraordinary ability to recall autobiographical events from her past. You can read the Wired article of her story here. At the scientists' behest, for example, she recalled—without ...


4

The literature generally provides strong support for the use of self-testing in cases like this, particularly via the use of flash cards (Karpicke and Roediger, 2008). The efficacy of self-testing for facilitating learning of arbitrary or complex sets of items has been suggested to be driven largely by the combination of two effects: the generation effect ...


3

Just a few words on mnemonics before answering your question. I have been practicing for two years. First because I was impressed how easy it was to remember items using these techniques. My personal best time for learning the order of 52 cards is 1min 40s, which is not really good compared to real competitors, but the point is that practicing 30min a day ...


3

Depending on what you consider 'photographic memory', there is a documented psychological syndrome called 'hyperthymesia' or 'highly superior autobiographical memory'. People with this condition can recall mundane aspects of nearly every day of their lives, such as what shoes a stranger was wearing 20 years ago. It's not quite the same as what 'eidetic ...


3

No, the distinction is real, not arbitrary. Implicit and explicit memory show different hallmark behavioral characteristics. A good overview of the difference between explicit and implicit memory is available in the MIT Encyclopedia of the Cognitive Sciences. The wikipedia page on implicit memory also has some useful information. Perhaps the most important ...


3

This is a tough question, and there's a few routes to go. When we are watching this life played back, do we want to be able to go to any arbitrary moment and observe what was happening, or do we only want to watch life as we watch it? This would be the difference between recording all information that bombards our brain, or just the information that we are ...


2

There is strong evidence that suggests there are changes in neural pathways, synapses, and even birth of new neurons due to changes in behavior, environment and neural processes. That is known as Neuroplasticity, which suggests that our brain's capacity can be "recycled" and even augmented in many cases. If I had to choose a metaphor to make an analogy of ...


2

The forgetting function In this answer about the relationship between time and recall I discussed how research shows that the relationship is often characterised by a three parameter power or exponential function. The basic idea is that the recall is a monotonically decreasing and decelerating function of time since the event. Forgetting as adaptive ...


1

The search terms "gradual-interval recall" may give you another area to research. I found that in a blog posting about SRS https://medium.com/p/5481606b087a "In a paper on gradual-interval recall published by Paul Pimsleur in 1967, he hypothesizes the following intervals: 5 seconds, 25 seconds, 2 minutes, 10 minutes, 1 hour, 5 hours, 1 day, 5 ...


1

the cognitive skills of a human population have a great variance. I am more like your friend, with episodic memory below average but semantic memory above average. You seem to have episodic memory above average (I envy you on that, because a large part of our feeling of self identity depends on episodic memory). There are extreme cases of people that ...


1

The remembering of specific events is known as Episodic memory, and you can find plenty about it online. It's usually contrasted with Semantic memory, which is generalized knowledge such as that "Paris is the capital of France". I'm going to leave it to other users, or myself at a later date, to provide additional references/explanation, but those are the ...


1

The answer is episodic. Episodic memory is responsible for storing information about events (or episodes) we have experienced; whereas semantic is for storing information about the world, such as the meaning of words. While semantic memory would be required to understand and thus encode the words in the first place, remembering the list of words would ...


1

Because memory is consolidated during sleep ( and dreaming) http://learnmem.cshlp.org/content/11/6/671.full http://psychcentral.com/news/2010/04/26/dreams-are-key-to-memory/13157.html there are also some psychological benefits from easyng painfull memories. http://newscenter.berkeley.edu/2011/11/23/dream-sleep/


1

Practice or forget, that is the rule. If you want to recall more words for your vocabulary then read more and write more texts with less common words. If you want to recall memories look at old photographs of your life and try to recall everything associated with those events. Memory improves when health improves, so work on that too.



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