Tag Info

New answers tagged

4

This will be a long post. FYI. To my knowledge, there is no evidence for back propagation in the brain. If you're interested specifically in that topic, Geoffrey Hinton (Dept. of CS @ UofT) has written about it. I'll try to focus on the biology. Some basic neurophysiology first. Neurons have a slightly negative electrical resting potential ...


1

I have cats. Whenever I let them out into the garden, the birds in the trees start chattering like crazy. Probably they are warning each other of these predators. When they're back in the house, the birds stop. Interestingly, they have no reaction to my dog. In this case, I guess the birds pass on the knowledge by warning each other whenever they see a ...


1

This isn't my area of expertise, but it's an interesting question so I did some poking around and ran across a couple of relevant papers. Human active learning http://papers.nips.cc/paper/3456-human-active-learning Castro, R. M., Kalish, C., Nowak, R., Qian, R., Rogers, T., & Zhu, X. (2009). Human active learning. In Advances in neural information ...


0

This is actually called abductive reasoning. As for how it the hypotheses are generated, one way is through analogical matching and inference (search google scholar for Analogico-deductive reasoning, for example).


3

To answer your question, you really have to specify what animal your talking about, some animals simply won't live long enough for learning to be an effective mechanism. If there are few predators, evolution will favour animals who are less vigilant about checking for potential predators generally, since this costs time (Google search vigilance behavioral ...


8

One umbrella term is causal reasoning, though this is a bit broader since there are theories of causal reasoning that are not about hypothesis testing. A Google Scholar search for "causal reasoning psychology" generates several hundred thousand hits, and the first page is full of relevant papers. Getting more specific, Klayman & Ha (1987) wrote an ...


2

It is absolutely possible but it would be a step backwards. In the early days of computing, punched cards and punched tape were used for input and output. They contained binary in the form of punched holes. It was well known that many individuals could read directly from the tape. Here is an old picture of just that. ...


3

Quite a bit of foundational research on skill acquisition is on how people learn to send and receive morse code. I'm no expert at morse code but it seems like it shares quite a bit with binary. For example, here is a graph of letters per minute that an operator could receive as a function of weeks of practice (Bryan & Harter, 1897). A general ...


2

If you look at ancient form of writing called cuneiform, that is as close to binary code as you can get. People did learn to read/write it in ancient times, but from my understanding it was so hard that it required years of training. In terms of teaching people to "speak computer" - this is very far off mark, computer programs are extremely long and ...



Top 50 recent answers are included