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6

I think the answer is a qualified yes, humans can think without language. Ultimately though it depends on what you mean by "think." There is a remarkably large number of deaf people who are not exposed either to a signed or spoken language even in developed countries. These people often invent their own gesture systems, referred to as home sign systems. ...


5

Motherese may play a role in emotional development. Soken and Pick write: "Concurrent with the exaggerated speech of motherese, there are probably exaggerated facial displays, allowing infants to explore the particular aspects of the face... Child-centered displays may serve as opportunities for learning about affective events." Walker-Andrews (1997) also ...


4

A lot of research seems to have been done on the challenges multilingualism poses for the human brain, but not so much on how much actually meeting those challenges improves one's overall cognitive capacity. At present the general approach seems to be summed up: "Cognitive science suggests that the brain has selective resources with limited capacity" (Emily ...


3

You are looking at learning from the wrong direction. A child does not learn a word. A child learns about a detail of the world and the word that is used to denote it. The word comes with the experience and is only attached to that experience as a label. What the child learns is the world. Adult learning is mostly similar. You either observe or experience ...


3

Self-report methodology was one of my qualifying exam topics as a doctoral student of social and personality psychology, so I've got a ton of references to offer, but I confess I haven't read most of them very thoroughly (if at all), and I've forgotten where exactly I've read some of this. It's really a very broad topic as well, so I won't list most I know ...


3

Certainly. It depends on the type of learning process of a person. One can be better at remembering images, so he might access the images first when trying to define an object/event/etc. This can be thought of as having a photographic memory. The main reason why most people think with words is because it is a much more sophisticated and structured ...


3

Stuttering is a neuromuscular disorder. It consists of problems in sequencing and timing the movements required for the speech. The whisper is speech without vibration of the vocal cords. Since there is no vocal fold vibration, the muscles that control pitch are not active and the larynx does not need to move. This means when the PWS ( person who stutters) ...


2

Conduct an experiment: Memorize two texts. It does not matter what kind of texts they are, but you must know them by heart and be able to recite them from memory. Now start reciting one of those texts (speak it aloud), and at the same time try to think the other text. Or recite one text and write the other, both at the same time. You will notice that you ...


2

The first option is to investigate exactly what his worries are and to put them in perspective. Often, people catastrophize their fears, imagining the worst possible scenario for a given situation. While that outcome may be a realistic possibility, often is not the only or even the most likely possibility. For instance, is he afraid that people will think ...


2

It seems to me that it'd be a type of a tip-of-the-tongue phenomenon caused by bilingualism. If you don't use German regularly, it might be attributed to language attrition, but this seems unlikely if you're still being exposed to German more than English. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tip-of-the-tongue_phenomenon#Effects_of_bilingualism


2

If we think of self-awareness as an evolved brain circuit phenomenon, its existence probably has little dependence on language in particular. This is evidenced by the fact that Alzheimer patients loss of self-awareness, as well as changes in self-awareness due to injury are associated with the frontal lobe. That's not to say that the self and ...


2

The time required to learn Braille may vary depending on factors such as age, partial/full and early/late blindness and individual differences (see here), but what has come out of studies such as this is that visual deprivation appears to speed up Braille learning. In the study I cite, all subjects received the same degree of training, but individuals who ...


2

I think "remember" might be a better choice than "don't forget" because the former would be taken more as a suggestion while the latter sounds limiting (as if it were a prohibition of sorts). Humans probably in average respond better to positively formed suggestions.


2

I'd argue that Churchill's "Never, never, NEVER give up" didn't reputedly have this effect. With 'Don't forget' the 'don't' may well outweigh the infinitive verb in its cognitive effect, especially if stressed. The language here is of stimulation, incentivising, or command, and I'd say the more likely undesired reaction is the dislike of the perceived ...


2

Difficulties with language is not actually a symptom of autism. Autism Spectrum Disorder involves difficulties in social communication and interaction, as well as restricted and repetitive interests or behaviours (DSM-V, 2013). The term "social communication" is referring to difficulties in the social aspects of language and other communication, such as ...


1

If you are interested in alternatives to PsychoPy and OpenSesame and running your experiments in a web browser, setup exercises, recruit participants via email, facebook or twitter, and evaluate your results online please visit stato.de and checkout one of the demos like Mental Rotation (the demos do not require signup). stato.de may implement this ...


1

Those who have learned a second language are guaranteed to consciously think of words and their corresponding meaning in your native language or vice versa. Actually no, my native language is Dutch but I'm also fluent in English, I never translate words anymore to my native language. To be honest if you give me an English text I will understand it ...


1

Disclaimer - I'm a big fan of, and occasional contributor to, OpenSesame. Yes, but you can't expect anyone here to do it for you. I would recommend using OpenSesame for this, as you'll need to use Python, and OpenSesame makes this side of things easier for beginners. My advice is to head over to the website, take a look at the documentation there, ...


1

Once an individual moves to another country, and avoids using their native language, all the things you are asking about will happen: Those who have learned a second language are guaranteed to consciously think of words and their corresponding meaning in your native language or vice versa. I'd say only those who are in the process of learning a new ...


1

It's unfortunate that the patient came to seek therapy so late, but fortunate that he came to seek therapy at all. First, I agree with user30295 in general, and just want to explain why: In the question, you say: "He only developed it a couple of months ago because of his anxiety;" ie, anxiety led to his condition - but what anxiety? In a later comment, ...


1

I think it's all about passion for languages. I have bilingual children and my first was having difficulties with my native language compared to the second one. It's all individual...So the answer is it depends in my opinion I think there is no advantage over the children from monolingual. Children from bilingual families take 2 different languages as ...


1

I've found an additional concept that may be related to the original question: prototype theory. Here's a summary from Wikipedia: Prototype theory is a mode of graded categorization in cognitive science, where some members of a category are more central than others. For example, when asked to give an example of the concept furniture, chair is more ...


1

It is hard to imagine what evidence might be found of thoughts existing without language. Even feral children encounter language (either verbal or nonverbal) through limited contact with people or animals, and lab animals communicate nonverbally with researchers, even if only through their environments (the researcher observes the animal's behavior, and the ...


1

One way of thinking about speech production is using a spreading activation architecture. Say I want to produce the word "rooster." I have a meaning to be expressed (feathery avian animal loud...etc). These semantic representations send activation down to various matching words (bird, rooster, chicken...etc). As these words collect evidence for themselves, ...


1

Charles Fletcher, one of my professors as an undergraduate, studies reading comprehension. He once mentioned a program called LiveInk, which he researches. This program is intended to improve comprehension for ordinary English, not programming language, but I don't see why it wouldn't work for programming language as well, to some extent at least. It ...



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