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10

Funnily enough, there was a Science article published on this (see here). In their sample of university students, Mehl et al. had participants wear a specialized device that recorded audio samples from daily life (The EAR). They report that (emphasis mine): The data suggest that women spoke on average 16,215 (SD = 7301) words and men 15,669 (SD = 8633) ...


7

The neologism used to describe this phenomenon is Typoglycemia. It relates to the cognitive processes behind reading written text. Randomising letters in the middle of words have little or no effect on the ability of skilled readers to understand the text. Because the human mind does not read every letter by itself but as a whole, it would work for any ...


7

The scrambled words game is very useful in persuading the less sophisticated to take a passing interest in their own cognitive processes! it is intriguing and also rewarding as it shows we can do something apparently rather difficult more easily than expected. However, the difficulty will be greater for second language learners at earlier stages of study. ...


5

The ‘jumbled word effect’ is due to the special way in which the human brain encodes the positions of letters in printed words. Psycholinguists investigate this effect with a procedure called masked-priming where a target word is primed with a briefly presented stimulus (usually a mix of target's letters). This lead to a model of word recognition that ...


4

Based on the previous answer, I digged a little deeper myself and found some other interesting data. The Mehl et al. paper is indeed great because it sampled naturally occurring speech occurring over several days. Previous research seems to rely mainly on speech sampled in specific situations. Nevertheless, the evidence seems to converge. I found two ...


4

There is a perspective called the "sociological imagination" that can be used to "frame," or interpret, perceptions. In part, this perspective involves an awareness toward the linkages between history and biography, between social structure and consciousness, and between "knowledge" and its socio-cultural contexts. The words you question are simply tools or ...


4

This is not a direct answer to the question, but a related construct that may be useful is alexithymia. Alexithymia is a personality construct describing relatively decreased ability to identify and express emotions. Psychometrically, the alexithymia construct has seen extensive use and undergone testing that by and large supported its validity (Bagby, ...


3

One way to think about this is called "self-distancing" (e.g., Kross & Ayduk, 2011), which has primarily been studied in terms of emotion regulation. Self-distancing is when you view your experiences from a third-person perspective. This is generally considered to be an adaptive form of self-reflection (as opposed to rumination, which is generally ...


3

The words we use have no inherent capacity to evoke negative or positive affect. Instead, how we appraise, reappraise, attend to, and reflect on those words determines our affective response (e.g., Gross, 1998; Siemer, Mauss, & Gross, 2007). For example, you could tell one person "You are stupid" and he/she might become extremely upset. You could tell ...


3

The time required to learn Braille may vary depending on factors such as age, partial/full and early/late blindness and individual differences (see here), but what has come out of studies such as this is that visual deprivation appears to speed up Braille learning. In the study I cite, all subjects received the same degree of training, but individuals who ...


3

This is my opinion. I have no sources for this. The common concept of thought in Western culture, going back to philosophers of the Enlightenment such as Leibniz, Locke, Hume and Descartes in the 17th and 18th century, is that of rational and, especially verbal thought. Philosophy and psychology (which grew from philosophy at the end of the 18th and during ...


2

Your initial intuition, that eliminating subvocalization makes understanding more difficult, seems to be consistent with empirical evidence. Slowiaczek and Clifton (1980) investigated the effect of eliminating subvocalization on reading comprehension, and concluded the following. In these experiments, reading for meaning was severely impaired when ...


2

(Unfortunately, the links appear to be broken, so I will reply to the title and bolded question.) Being forced to use a language you are unfamiliar with as a language technique is known as immersion learning. I could not find direct comparisons of adults and children, but based on evidence from educational systems, it appears that early immersion does not ...


2

Preliminary answer I intend to improve later. Stumbled upon this in the context of description of how people read: According to this paper on readin (Sousa, 2005), novice readers internally verbalize written words of English and German using "an area of the brain just above and behind Wernicke's area". This area then communicates with the Broca's area and ...


2

The first option is to investigate exactly what his worries are and to put them in perspective. Often, people catastrophize their fears, imagining the worst possible scenario for a given situation. While that outcome may be a realistic possibility, often is not the only or even the most likely possibility. For instance, is he afraid that people will think ...


2

I think "remember" might be a better choice than "don't forget" because the former would be taken more as a suggestion while the latter sounds limiting (as if it were a prohibition of sorts). Humans probably in average respond better to positively formed suggestions.


2

I'd argue that Churchill's "Never, never, NEVER give up" didn't reputedly have this effect. With 'Don't forget' the 'don't' may well outweigh the infinitive verb in its cognitive effect, especially if stressed. The language here is of stimulation, incentivising, or command, and I'd say the more likely undesired reaction is the dislike of the perceived ...


2

Difficulties with language is not actually a symptom of autism. Autism Spectrum Disorder involves difficulties in social communication and interaction, as well as restricted and repetitive interests or behaviours (DSM-V, 2013). The term "social communication" is referring to difficulties in the social aspects of language and other communication, such as ...


1

Once an individual moves to another country, and avoids using their native language, all the things you are asking about will happen: Those who have learned a second language are guaranteed to consciously think of words and their corresponding meaning in your native language or vice versa. I'd say only those who are in the process of learning a new ...


1

Yes it is possible. In my case I lived in a country and spoke the native language until the age of 27. Then I moved to England to further pursue my career. My immediate thinking was in my native language which I converted on the fly to English as I spoke. While listening I had to do the same but just in reverse. After about 5 years I realised that I was ...


1

Have you noticed your own word ordering as well as your word decisions? Better: Sometimes, a friend says his words jumbled, seemingly out of place. Though I understand him, always, he seems to be unaware of how he speaks. As well, she speaks slowly. Yet, this friend writes well. Also, he seems to listen well. What could cause his problem? Look up ...


1

If you are interested in alternatives to PsychoPy and OpenSesame and running your experiments in a web browser, setup exercises, recruit participants via email, facebook or twitter, and evaluate your results online please visit stato.de and checkout one of the demos like Mental Rotation (the demos do not require signup). stato.de may implement this ...


1

Those who have learned a second language are guaranteed to consciously think of words and their corresponding meaning in your native language or vice versa. Actually no, my native language is Dutch but I'm also fluent in English, I never translate words anymore to my native language. To be honest if you give me an English text I will understand it ...


1

Disclaimer - I'm a big fan of, and occasional contributor to, OpenSesame. Yes, but you can't expect anyone here to do it for you. I would recommend using OpenSesame for this, as you'll need to use Python, and OpenSesame makes this side of things easier for beginners. My advice is to head over to the website, take a look at the documentation there, ...


1

There are often motor control issues, the case study below exemplifies these and an approach to overcoming them with help from technology. As well as the below, there are many personal accounts such as those of Carly Fleischman and Tito Mukhopadhyay that describe the struggle to align output with inner thought. Language is More than Speech: A Case Study ...


1

I think it's all about passion for languages. I have bilingual children and my first was having difficulties with my native language compared to the second one. It's all individual...So the answer is it depends in my opinion I think there is no advantage over the children from monolingual. Children from bilingual families take 2 different languages as ...



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