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5

Quite certainly this is the case (even if you learn all words from a dictionary), but this is more of a philosophical debate. It is unclear what you are after when referring to 'pessimistic', 'optimistic', or 'abstract' outcomes, but I can point you in the right direction in case you want to read up more on this subject. One concept that comes to mind from ...


4

A study by Rainer et al. (2011) has shown that words are skipped and apparently filled in mentally quite often (in the order of 8 to 30% of times). Two important factors that increased skipping rates were the length of the word and the predictability of the word due to contextual constraints. Both cases apply on the word 'the', because it is short and ...


3

That is a really interesting question. There are some studies that found that the emotional response is strong in one's native language compared to languages that are acquired later. For instance, a study by Harris and colleagues found that physiological arousal was stronger to swear words or childhood reprimands in the first language of the participants ...


3

Since this (excellent) question has been around for a while without any answer, I thought I'd give my two cents, like the help centre suggests. Other people may be able to expand on this and find appropriate sources, research, etc. I think we do this as a gesture of respect to the other person. We may fear that if we don't acknowledge them at all, it will ...


2

Much of what we perceive cannot be expressed by language. It's unspeakable. As a consequence, differences in interpretation are very common, especially when it involves complex abstract concepts or highly subjective emotional experiences. To quote Kim Krizan: Creation seems to come out of imperfection. It seems to come out of a striving and a ...


2

Yes, there have been a number of studies on language development in children with congenital profound visual impairment (PVI) over the years. Selma Fraiberg first described differences in early development, specifically later emergence of personal pronouns compared to typically sighted children [1]. More recent studies found that the vocabulary development ...


1

This is a typical example of the misrepresentation of scientific reseach in popular media. The orignal study concludes that "language effects on cognition are context-bound and transient, revealing unprecedented levels of malleability in human cognition". The word "personality" does not appear in the original paper. Nevertheless the Daily Mail comes to the ...


1

What is Autism? Psychologists, psychoanalysts and neuroscientists all commonly apply a triune model of the brain : The Reptilian complex (aka “instinct” aka “the Id”) : where primitive subconscious emotions (such as sadness, anger, fear and happiness) reside and which is correlated to primitive neurochemical algorithms that measure one’s capacity to take ...



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