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Firmin et al. (2008) tested the validity of a handful of online IQ tests by having college students complete IQ tests at three different websites and also complete a validated lab measure, the Reynolds Intellectual Assessment Scales (RIAS). They found that there were moderate correlations ($r$ values were around 0.4 to 0.5) between some of the online tests ...


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Another option is ScriptingRT. It's open source and fairly easy to use. The experiments are designed via a script language and then compiled into Flash apps. ScriptingRT is designed to measure reaction time differences in the millisecond range. Schubert et al. (2013) report comparisons with other response time programs (e.g., DMDX, e-prime, Inquisit, see ...


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There are a few factors that could contribute to differences between online versus in-lab reaction time measurement. Hardware variation Participants in an online experiment will use their own computers to complete the task, which will result in lots of variation in hardware. Many studies have looked at how hardware variations affect response time ...


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Short answer: The data is likely to be noisier, the absolute reaction time can't be trusted, but given enough power (which is easy to obtain on the Internet) relative reaction time differences should be similar to those in the lab. However, web-based reaction time studies might pose other problems, because you have less control over stimulus presentation and ...


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Depending on how you collect the data, reaction times collected "online" will likely be different from those collected "on-site". When considering reaction times, it is important to decide if the reaction time is being used as a trigger, as the time to a response, or the difference in the time to response. Consider an experiment which displays a random ...



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