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7

Recent studies on this topic deal with more detailed questions, that are analysed using structural equation models (Deary et al., 2006). A main goal has been the identification of specific genes. No single genes have been found until today and Sternberg (2012) also points out that the concept of heritability itself is indirect and maybe inappropriate if ...


6

The question you have asked is not a new one. In fact, from the times of classical antiquity, Plato considered artistic creativity as a result of god-given madness. When it comes to popular figures in the arts and sciences, however, it is important to note that the illness is not restricted to them by any means. Lord Byron and Beethoven are said to be manic-...


5

Can any arbitrary [able bodied] human become a genius across multiple disciplines or at least one discipline assuming that they have some Secondary Eduction in these disciplines? No, not all able bodied humans will be able to be become a genius across one or more disciplines. Assuming genius in this context means someone achieving international acclaim ...


4

Sounds to me like someone is making a logical fallacy here, though the origin of this fallacy isn't clear to me. We cannot go from 'poor academic performance', to 'not amounting to anything', to 'having a low IQ'. These are not relationships of cause and effect. The motivation to do something ('amount to something', if you will) is driven primarily by the ...


4

General points about practice effects Intelligence tests differ in how much they are subject to practice effects. Practice effects can also be distinguished: Time between taking the test: The shorter the timeframe the more likely you will see practice related improvement. General practice on similar tests and similar items versus practice on the same set ...


4

These terms are defined by the underlying theory of Intelligence. For example: Social Intelligence (SI) comes from a definition by Edward Thorndike in 1920. Emotional Intelligence (EI) (or EQ - Q=Quota) first appeared in a 1964 paper by Michael Beldoch, later by Goleman. Then there is Interpersonal & Intrapersonal Intelligences from Howard Gardner's ...


3

This question may be too complex to answer specifically as there are several components that identify Logical-Mathematical intelligence. In terms of behaviour high LMI people need things to explore and think about, and are often seen as manipulative and often seek new experiences or topic matter to discover. These people love to experiment, question, ...


2

Short answer: Processing speed is linked to executive functioning (EF) ability as well as specific, individual abilities (verbal, spatial, etc.), whereas generalized inspection time (IT) and reaction time (RT) to simple stimuli is more representative of general intelligence. Detailed answer: There are several factors that go into intelligence. Three ...


2

Yes, there are several studies which found links between the amount of training and the effect of it on cognitive abilities. See the below for references and summaries of some of these: Jaeggi, Susanne M., et al. "Improving fluid intelligence with training on working memory." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 105.19 (2008): 6829-6833. Jaeggi ...


2

I think what Einstein had in mind is that in order to come up with original ideas one must keep a balance between knowledge and creativity, as already stated by Jeromy Anglim. In a paper titled "The Composing Process and the Academic Composing Process" written by Stephen Krashen, Krashen says: Although there is no empirical research on this hypothesis, ...


2

Although the idea that IQ only enables creativity "up to IQ 120" is widespread (and repeated in pop-psych books such as those of Gladwell etc.), large scale studies of giftedness reliably find that the IQ and creativity are associated even at the very highest-extremes of ability. IQ is linearly related to creative achievement across the range (Wai et al., ...


2

Why would I be asked to count backwards by 3, from 100 in a psychological test? This is to test your cognitive reasoning abilities, particularly your ability to concentrate and recall serial information. Similar tests are administered to injured sports players to ensure that they do not have a concussion. 1 What's a baker's dozen? What do you think "...


2

Short answer "Perceptual competence" is "the ability to perceive". Background I Googled "perceptual competence" and the first hit was an open source article (Lencz et al., 2003). They define perceptual competence as: [The] initial representation of to-be-remembered material [in the context of working memory]. Perceptual competency itself can include ...


2

In addition to MariaAnt's good contribution, let me take another angle. You wrote: Studies comparing identical and fraternal twins, or occasionally identical twins reared apart have mostly concluded that there is a pretty high heritability of IQ. These studies, in particular the identical twins reared apart studies, imply that someone with the same genes ...


2

This is not an answer to your question but you probably want lookup Howard Gardner and his theory of Multiple Intelligence (MI). The basic proposition here is that the IQ test (origins in the work by Alfred Binet) is not a wholistic measure of intelligence and that it measures the ability of one to think in a certain expected way. Gardner proposes that ...


2

Good question, and no one really has a definitive answer, but it is generally considered that a system, as you described, is not a metamind as you call it, or a singular being. First lets define what a being is: A being is a system that works together to collectively maintain all characteristics of life. These are: being made up of cells the ability to ...


2

I don't think anybody wants to limit particular topics on here, but the point of the site is to discuss science. Science starts with empirical observation, rather than just anecdote. So the first flaw in your view seems to be that you are taking your anecdotal experience as evidence for "a trend of lower IQ in women". Many people have looked SCIENTIFICALLY ...


1

Our brain runs on a series of chemical and electrical reactions running at a stable pace. Unlike computers, you cannot "overclock" the brain into running these reactions any faster than normal. However, if we were to assume the psuedoscience to be true, it would be logical for the brain to undergo premature death. With the rates of these reactions increased ...


1

According to Howard Gardner and his theory of Multiple Intelligence, I can propose that there is no link between IQ and the ability to mimic sound. The IQ test (originating in the work by Alfred Binet) is not a measure of intelligence pre-se, but rather a measure of the ability of the subject to comprehend in the manner expected. [Look for Gardner's ...


1

Regarding schizophrenia and loss of IQ: I don't know how much we can say about the 'loss' of IQ in schizophrenia patients. If anything, it appears to me that a decrease in overall IQ is augmented by the cognitive deficits associated with schizophrenia. This isn't to say that you can't increase your IQ with certain interventions, which I will touch on ...


1

The length of your question and it's tags make it quite confusing, however what you mentioned about the brain processing tasks sequentially and then hitting an efficiency bottle-neck when using conflicting resources reminds me of the research of Neils Taatgen. He uses a cognitive model called ACT-R to do computer simulations to predict what efficiency ...


1

Regarding Cronbach's $\alpha$, Wikipedia writes: It has been proposed that $\alpha$ can be viewed as the expected correlation of two tests that measure the same construct. Note that correlation is a nonparametric concept. Its definition is independent on the functional form and functional relationship of the two variables. There are numerous ways to ...


1

The concept of creativity per se makes it hard to measure it in a standardized way, since creativity by definition opposes standardization. Even tests such as the one suggested by Krysta run into the problem that in order to rate answers with regard to their rarity will have to rely on some kind of standardization according to which one can rate the answers ...


1

The question combines concepts of motivation, IQ, and effects of study over time. There is a modest (r=.3) correlation between IQ and openness to experience, which makes brighter people also more interested in a range of topics. In addition, higher IQ leads to learning about areas that an individual is not much motivated towards: This is why general ...


1

An otherwise 'brilliant' person can be slow at solving certain problems, yes. And no, cognitive performance is not the same thing as running a marathon. A marathon measures your ability to reach a certain point in a certain amount of time. An intelligence test (or any academic test, for that matter) assesses to make sure that you have learned the material ...



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