Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

11

Probably the most striking evidence of "happiness homeostasis" is a now classic study by Brickman, Coates and Bulman (1978) which compared the self-reported happiness of lottery winners and accident victims with a control group. The following quote describes the part of the outcome you'd be interested in succinctly: Lottery winners and controls were not ...


6

You are asking two different questions in your title and the text. I will answer the text question, explain why you are asking two different questions, and comment on the title question. The human mind seems to have some sort of relational structure for how it works with ideas. This is usually study in the domain of memory via free recall. In a free recall ...


3

There is no known specific process or part of the human brain which, when activated, causes the person to daydream, engage in fantasy or come up with ideas that are far from common reality. Instead, imagination is a broad-based activity which involves and overlaps with many brain regions and cognitive processes. The cognitive neuroscientific basis of ...


2

There is some support for a short-term day residue effect in the literature, but no support for a more extended dream-lag effect. Nielsen and Powell (1992) published a test of the day residue effect (incorporation of material from the immediately preceding day) and the dream-lag effect (incorporation of material from 6–8 days prior). Based on dream journals ...


2

There are no known domain-general ways of formulating good questions and problems—what constitutes a good question or problem formulation depends on the field or domain. A good psychology question is different from a good literary question, which in turn is different from a good business question. Because there are no known domain-independent ways of ...


1

I'm not able to directly answer your question, but I would suggest you take a look at some of the ideas association with Lev Vygotsky (wikipedia is as good a place to start as any). Schema theory is a relatively static idea - schemata exist as simplified internal representations of an external reality, and are symbolic, much like the memory of a computer. ...


1

I don't know of separate terms to differentiate 'schema present in an individual' from 'potential "schemata/patterns/ideas" out in the world not yet encountered by the individual', but with regard to 'schema currently being added or adjusted by an individual', I can at least offer some related terms. Accommodation is the process by which schemata are ...


1

I'm wondering if your approach to "identify[ing] problems, not solutions," will include so-called reverse or negative brainstorming, in which participants are directed to consider "what can be done to break something instead of focusing solely on narrow-minded fixes,"1 to be "highly critical, rather than highly creative."2 If this is the case, the group ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible