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Research shows that teenagers are not any less capable at driving, per se, but that the adolescent brain undergoes a period of neural changes that often lends itself to risk-seeking behavior. From Somerville et. al (2010): In adolescence, there is a heightened propensity to engage in risky behaviors that can lead to negative outcomes, including substance ...


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Often, very similar phenomena have different names when studied in different modalities, because they are studied by different communities. That's why searching for perception response times + auditory doesn't yield great results (Although I did find [1] this way). Something else to try, is to pick a highly cited paper that you did find, and then search ...


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Since you mentioned the Stroop specifically, several versions of the Stroop task are available for Inquisit here. Randall Engle's lab also maintains a set of validated working memory tasks, which are available on request to researchers. They include full and shortened versions of operation-, symmetry-, reading- and rotation-span for E-Prime 2.0. Assuming I ...


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As I mentioned in my comment, I would be less likely to blame this on brain chemistry and more likely to blame it on lack of experience. While I have not reviewed the research, it would be very difficult to isolate a mental development pattern from all the other confounding variables of young drivers. First, driving is inherently a procedural task. It ...


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Disclaimer: This answer is a bit self-serving because it only describes research work from the lab where I am a student. However, I think it's relevant for the question! Coordination of eye, head, and hand http://www.cis.rit.edu/research/vpl/publications/ExpBrainRes2001.pdf Pelz, J., Hayhoe, M., & Loeber, R. (2001). The coordination of eye, head, and ...



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