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8

What you describe is an illusion. (a) The human field of view is almost 180° when staring straight ahead and 270° with eyeball rotation (looking to the side without turning your head). If you look at someone from slightly behind and to the side, they will appear to be gazing forward, and you may feel unnoticed, but in fact you are within their field of ...


6

Rather than discuss limits of the human field of view, or extrasensory perception (I don't know anything about the first, and the second is a myth), I think we can look at this as a simple case of illusory correlation (wikipedia), which is both a psychological phenomenon, and something psychologists need to overcome to investigate other phenomena. In a ...


5

It's an interesting phenomena. And I think it can be seen in many other domains beyond lifts. At least where I live, pedestrian crossings have buttons, which I've seen people repeatedly press. You can see it often on computers and other digital devices when the system does not immediately respond to user input. Basic Bayesian Rational Actor My starting ...


5

The images you've linked are composites, and so probably don't contain the characteristics by which raters were able to judge IQ accurately. The original article (Kleisner, Chvátalová, & Flegr, 2014) is freely available and appears to answer your question in its abstract: Faces that are perceived as highly intelligent are rather prolonged with a ...


5

ISO 9241, a standard covering ergonomics of human-computer interaction, defines in its subsection 9241-110, "Dialogue Principles", that the interface in information systems should be (among other things): suitable for the task facilitate learning conform with user expectations describe its own purpose and functioning You could translate all this to: ...


4

The answer is "yes." The entire field of Human Factors and Ergonomics is devoted to enhancing the experience of the human user. Cognitive engineering is the branch of human factors that focuses specifically on how people perceive and respond to system interfaces. Engineers and scientists in this field try to design components, systems, interfaces, and even ...


4

The answer is no. Definition of imprinting is: A rapid learning process by which a newborn or very young animal establishes a behavior pattern of recognition and attraction towards other animals of its own kind, as well as to specific individuals of its species, such as its parents, or to a substitute for these. Ducklings, for example, will imprint upon and ...


4

Presumably, most updates to system interfaces are designed to achieve some goal related to the owner of the system. Often this would be usability, but of course, it could be something else like profitability, security, etc. Interface changes for non-usability related goal: So the first point is that a subset of interface updates are performed with a goal ...


3

Well, actually I have often had the experience that buttons on appliances signal that they have been pressed but nevertheless the appliance does not react. For example, right here under my computer is an external hard disk. A light glows when I press the on/off button. Still, the hard disk does not turn on about 80% of the time, when I press the button (the ...


3

Multiple causes of not reading instructions As @crash notes, there are likely many explanations for not reading instructions. It may be motivated by not caring about task performance. And such dispositions may be specific to the particular task or setting, or they might be partially related to some general disposition of the individual in terms of ...


1

There is a lot of context to extract from this: For example if "using the X tool" requires a lot of time, it would be time-consuming to actually go by yourself and try for hours, when you could instead ask for help from someone who already has some knowledge of it. Also, people are all different, some people want to know how "things work in their ...


1

In my experience, there are people who like to follow instructions and those who don't. It's in their nature, they were born like this. Some want to do the thing right, the way it was intended, not make mistake, and take most profit from it. Some like to figure things on their own, push all buttons to see what does what. Now regarding why people read badly ...


1

Yes. The phenomenon is usually referred to as Visual Dominance or Visual Capture. A very nice demonstration of it, is known as McGurk Effect, in which our vision of the speaker's lips biases our perception of the sound we hear [1]. The McGurk Effect can be seen in a demo video here. Another demonstration of a similar effect is ventriloquism, in which we ...



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