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Short answer Hair cells in the cochlea can code sound intensity via the amount of neurotransmitter they release. Higher sound levels result in more neurotransmitter release and in turn to higher firing rates in the spiral ganglion cells of the auditory nerve. Background Sound waves are picked up by the mechanoreceptors in the inner ear: the hair cells. ...


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Short answer In practice, absolute pitch is generally tested for by using musical pitch classes. Background Absolute pitch (AP) is the ability to identify the pitch of a musical tone, or to produce a musical tone at a given pitch without the use of an external reference pitch. Most humans process musical pitch relatively rather than absolutely, and in fact ...


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Short answer In the case of simple stimuli, visual and auditory stimuli can be offset between 25 and 50 ms and still be perceived as coming from one and the same same event. Background The question can be re-phrased as what is the window of integration of intersensory asynchrony in case of visual and auditory stimuli? A well-known example where these two ...


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It can be either, and is typically both, considering that Absolute pitch is an act of cognition, needing memory of the frequency, a label for the frequency (such as "B-flat"), and exposure to the range of sound encompassed by that categorical label. Another way to look at it is that pitch class came from the necessary assessment and organization of ...


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The ability to understand speech at increased voice rates is all about learning. A notable example in this regard is the use of text-to-speech software like Jaws used by blind folks unable to read the written word. Jaws is able to convert text on screen into the spoken word using a speech generator. After people get used to read on-screen content through ...


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Speaking as a musician and one-time music teacher, this is not just true of the voice. When an instrumentalist records and plays back a performance, it can be very disconcerting. This is especially true of beginners who often imagine they sound much better than they really do. I suspect that the action of performing somehow suppresses the ability to listen. ...



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