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8

Heritability estimates of Extraversion (and other Big 5 factors) The introduction section of Loehlin et al (1998) provides a narrative review of heritability estimates of big 5 personality traits (i.e., one of which is extraversion). A brief extract gives a flavour of some of the research that has been conducted: A recent heritability analysis of the ...


8

Monozygotic twin studies are the general course of action for this kind of question. Genetic and environmental influences on multiple dimensions of religiosity: a twin study concludes there is a genetic component. A complete approach for these kind of studies is to take twins that have been separated to different households from birth and compare them to ...


6

To learn about other twins reared apart, investigate the earlier Minnesota Study of Twins Reared Apart and the ongoing Minnesota Twin Family Study. To pique your curiosity: Jim Lewis and Jim Springer stand out in the Minnesota Study of Twins Reared Apart because some of their two histories were strikingly identical; several notable examples: 1st wife: ...


6

psychological sequelae might be a word you're looking for if you forgive that it's somehow still neurobiological; it is however, not genetic or developmental or something somebody was born with: Chronic kidney disease, for example, is sometimes a sequela of diabetes, and neck pain is a common sequela of whiplash or other trauma to the cervical vertebrae. ...


5

As I alluded in the comments, I think your question is underpinned by a more fundamental worry of the "best level of description" for psychological phenomena. If you a reductionist then you believe that all of psychology is best explained in terms of the activity of neurons (or systems of neurons if you are of the system perspective; note that some do not ...


5

First of all, asymmetries in apparently symmetric creatures (of which most are) are actually quite typical. However, in most cases of hand dominance, there is no population-wide hand dominance. In other words, the population is split 50/50 between left and right handers. In humans, however, a lack of hand dominance is often associated with cognitive ...


4

Yes, phobias appear to be partly hereditary. This encompasses both genetic and environmental factors. Kendler et al. (1999) review some work in this area: We have previously reported, from a population-based sample of female twins, that the liability to agoraphobia, social phobia and animal phobia was modestly infuenced by genetic factors with ...


2

This is my own conjecture: I would think a Nature/neurobiological/genetic disorder would be classified as some sort of "Structural Disorder." Maybe the Nurture side would be something like "Processing Disorder"? (this is assuming we're talking maladaptive effects) Is our science even to a point where we can differentiate between a neurobiological ...



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