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Alright, it's high time I actually answer this question. Beatrice de Gelder and crew published two papers that examined this with fMRI (here) and EEG (here). fMRI study In the fMRI study, they presented participants with emotional faces against threatening and neutral backgrounds, with various controls (a triangle, a scrambled background). The ...


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In addition to @mrt's great answer. I feel that the following excerpt from the 'crying' section from the "The Newborn Infant" chapter in my Developmental Psychology classes' textbook would shed light on your question. This is quoted directly from "How Children Develop, Third Edition" by Robert Siegler, Judy DeLoache and Nancy Eisenberg": How do you feel ...


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The two main folks in crying research (of whom I'm aware) are Ad Vingerhoets and Jonathan Rottenberg. They've (together and separately) published reviews of adult crying and crying across the lifespan, as well as empirical articles. The general impression they give is that we know very little about the neuropsychobiology of crying, given that crying has ...


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@Cemre,@MariaAnt-Humans' crying is very natural,because of the following fact: These are tears produced in response to that strong emotion that they experience from stress,pleasure,anger,sadness and suffering to indeed,physical pain (and often due to jealousy felt at others' success),Psychic tears even have a natural painkiller,called leucine ...


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I recall a study from maybe 30 years ago that got people to cry by chopping onions and others cry because of watching a sad movie. The content of the tears were tested, and the sad tears had a mood-elevating chemical element. I recall the study because I had seen the movie they used: All Mine To Give, about orphaned children, where the eldest had to parcel ...


3

There are a number of scales that are used to measure happiness. One widely used measure is the PANAS, the "Positive and Negative Affect Schedule" (Watson, Clark, & Tellegen, 1988). Lyubomirsky and Lepper (1999) have developed the Subjective Happiness Scale, there is the satisfaction with life scale (Diener et al. 1985), and the Oxford Happiness ...


7

My knowledge of the neurobiology of pleasure (aka, hedonia, hedonic happiness, happiness, "liking", reward, etc.) is admittedly lacking, but I'd contend that this is mostly true because we actually know very little about how pleasure is instantiated in the brain. So the answer to your question is that we don't know! First of all, mesolimbic dopamine seems ...



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