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For "permanent" loss of experience of happiness or pleasure, check out the term Anhedonia From my own understanding, a brain can shift between different states of mind. Depression is just one such state. I have a more detailed answer about states of mind here, but the important point is that states of mind color perception of past, present and future. Your ...


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The words we use have no inherent capacity to evoke negative or positive affect. Instead, how we appraise, reappraise, attend to, and reflect on those words determines our affective response (e.g., Gross, 1998; Siemer, Mauss, & Gross, 2007). For example, you could tell one person "You are stupid" and he/she might become extremely upset. You could tell ...


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Interoceptive awareness and accuracy Interoceptive awareness and accuracy are sometimes used interchangeably, but can also refer to two different things: awareness to the tendency to attend to interoception measured by self-report, and accuracy to the actual accuracy with which one does so (Chentsova-Dutton and Dzokoto, 2014). For example, a cross-cultural ...


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The background of the measure can be found here. The article implies that it is an ad-hoc measure of emotions created for this study: Every week, we checked in with our students to see how they were feeling. We showed them a sequence of six cartoon faces created by Pixar artist Matt Jones to convey fear, enthusiasm, anger, affection, sadness, and ...


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There are at least two different lines of research that are relevant here. Forecasting errors One large line of research has shown that are pretty bad in forecasting future events. This can be seen, for example, in the stable tendency to overestimate the affective impact of negative as well as positive events in terms of intensity and duration. In other ...


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There is no agreed-upon definition of affective cueing because it's not a proper name. If you google for "affective cueing" you only find a handful of hits and in them the term is used differently, mostly to indicate that some cue (a stimulus that carries information) is of positive versus negative valence. In contrast, affective priming refers to a ...


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Cognitive science generally does not try to explain individual behavior, but rather the behavior of all people. We can meaningfully speak about what may cause a deficient ability to feel guilt and remorse, or other features that characterize an individual, but we cannot speak directly about the individual's behavior outside an applied or clinical context. ...


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This sounds a little bit like a mild form of Depersonalization. From Wikipedia: The core symptom of depersonalization disorder is the subjective experience of "unreality in one's sense of self", and as such there are no clinical signs. People who are diagnosed with depersonalization also experience an almost uncontrollable urge to question and think ...


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I'd like to add some nuance here. While not isolated to reading emotion in the eyes, consider these images from Hillel Aviezer's work (1, 2): In all four images above, the face is the same. What changes is the body language and objects in the scene. What also changes is the emotions you perceive in each image (in alphabetical order: disgust, anger, ...



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