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It appears that there's been a lot of research done by USC professor Antonio Damasio on the importance of emotions. There's some fascinating case studies and interviews that are worth reading and listening to, but the short summary, as I understand it, is: Emotions are important because they end up directing reason. Without emotion, there are simply too ...


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Are emotions really necessary for survival? No, not for survival; lots of living things around us without even a brain. Did emotions provide an evolutionary advantage in the past? The areas of the brain we associate with emotion were around far back in our evolutionary past - long before conscious reasoning appeared. Emotions are still an important part ...


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This question becomes more complicated if we think in terms of "emotions" (e.g., angry, happy, sad, afraid, etc.) than in terms of "affect" (positive and negative feelings, high and low arousal). I'll start with affect and move on to emotions. An affective state tags an object with a certain value--and it does so very quickly (e.g., Pham, 2007). For ...


1

Short answer Emotions are not necessary for survival, but they may provide evolutionary advantages. Background Although crocodiles cry, they do not feel any remorse in killing their prey when shedding tears doing so (they empty their lachrymals when snapping their jaws shut). Given their relative brain size we can expect (but never know) that they do not ...


3

There are (at least) two approaches to tackle this question (which haven't been mentioned in the other answers). One is an personality approach, another is a more situational approach. Personality: Emotional Clarity A part of the question is the idea that some people have more difficulties in knowing why they are sad. This is indeed relevant in research ...


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I think of emotions as bringing something to your attention. They are alarm bells, not thinking and evaluating. My favorite analogy is the "Christmas tree" display on a submarine: red and green lights that show whether critical openings are closed so the ship can submerge. Without any emotion, it would be unclear what someone would focus on, thus, be ...


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"Association" in psychology refers to a connection between conceptual entities or mental states that results from the similarity between those states or their proximity in space or time. The idea stems from Plato and Aristotle, especially with regard to the succession of memories, and it was carried on by philosophers such as John Locke, David Hume, David ...


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While this is not a credible answer, I'd like to share these personal anecdotes: My greatest disappointment when buying a game was when the game was over hyped, and the reality did not live up to exaggerated expectations. My greatest satisfaction with games came from discovering "hidden gems" - games which have no expectations attached to them. We live ...


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I think the two can be mediated with being Realistic. Sometimes, and in conclusion, this is pessimistic in nature - especially if one tends to dwell on things or generally 'suffer' from dampened, over-extensive neuronal networks. Pessimism can lead to certain insights that can be a downward spiral of despair, but often lead to recognition of a situation ...


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"I just wondered if there was a term for enjoying the sensations of guilt" I'd call that masochism. The reason I say so is because guilt tends to be painful for most people. It seems useful mostly for adjusting future behavior. It is extremely unpleasant for most and we tend to shy away from doing whatever caused it again, if we have the awareness to do ...


1

I do believe these concepts should not be applied as in boolean logic, with either ALL PESSIMISTIC or ALL OPTIMISTIC, but in a rather spectral fashion. Happiness is closely linked to having lower expectations: (...) Robb Rutledge says, “Happiness depends not on how well things are going but whether things are going better or worse than expected.” ...


4

There is a huge body of literature on emotion regulation. The main person to look up is James Gross. He's recently published a second edition of the Handbook of Emotion Regulation if you'd like a comprehensive review of the field. He also just published a target article in Psychological Inquiry about the present status of emotion regulation research and ...


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NAPS Marchewka A, Żurawski L, Jednoróg K, Grabowska A. The Nencki Affective Picture System (NAPS). Introduction to a novel standardized wide range high quality realistic pictures database.Behavior Research Methods, 46: 596-610, 2014 Selecting appropriate stimuli to induce emotional states is essential in affective research. Only a few standardized ...


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I don't think there's a term specifically for pleasurable guilt. However, depending on whom you ask, there's a couple ways we can talk about this feeling. If we assume that guilt can only be experienced as negative, then we might describe pleasurable guilt as pleasure about guilt (i.e., a positive meta-emotional experience of guilt; for a review on ...


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You may have a look at the EmoMadrid-database. Here are the instructions on how to get access.



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