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All attraction involves the brain. The brain is responsible for consciousness, perception, and motivation. Not all attraction is physical. In two structural theories of love with which I'm familiar, physical attraction corresponds to a minority of what constitutes love. Love isn't exactly the same as attraction, but much of these theories' content implies ...


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It may have something to do with the manner in which the water flows. Disturbed or moving water has a frequency content/distribution that approaches noise (think ocean waves lapping up against the the shoreline/beach, which is close to white noise). Our hearing system tends to tune out when presented with white noise, mainly due to there being no ...


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I think you've misunderstood the set point. It's a point of balance (or imbalance) of positive and negative affect toward which a person naturally gravitates. As such, there's not much need to do anything about leaving the set point except to wait / go on living and let time, neurochemistry, and daily life do the work. Deliberate effort is more likely to ...


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If your time constraint isn't too strict, I would say its well worth it. And sometimes they can get it out faster than 30 days. I actually work in the lab that made the IAPS and especially the mutilation ones are pretty gruesome. Depends on what category of negative ones you need, some databases specialize in only select ones. The IAPS has mutilation, ...


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I would recommend the 730 pictures Geneva affective picture database (GAPED). It has been validated worldwide, and the cultural bias is more limited than other image resources. There are general positive/neutral/negative images, with valence and activations scores. Some other more specific images are also provided (snakes, spîders). Download here Read the ...


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If you have nothing against crawling the figurative arse of the internet, then 4chan's /b/ board might provide what you're seeking. I managed to scrape together a few hundred images for a quick-and-dirty EIB study using this approach (I don't have the images anymore, else I'd gladly forward them to you). Just make sure the ethics committee doesn't have a ...


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This is pretty close to being a classic example of a framing effect (wikipedia), originally described in the literature by Tversky & Kahneman (1986). In essence, our subjective valuation of a choice or outcome isn't invariant, as economic theory says it should be, but instead is influenced by contextual effects, such as riskiness, and if the outcome is ...


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Without knowing exactly what the factor you are interested in is, it is hard to predict how feasible it would be to manipulate it. For example, is it possible to make two videos of the speaker, one with the factor, and one without, with nothing else changing? My guess is that you probably can't do this, so I'm going to focus on how you might be able to run ...


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I see you want to measure reactions based on viewing a clip by demographics. How do I quantify how upset, uncomfortable, aggravated or displeased the subject felt? You quantify it by gathering hard data: heart rate, blood pressure, pupil dilation (if you can get it in the video), and whatever other similar experiments have measured. You have a ...


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Polygraph-style measurements might be useful to get some hard data - emotional excitement and stress have biological effects, and measuring+recording heart rate and blood pressure can be done rather simply. For qualitative analysis, it would be useful to capture as much as you can of the experiment - e.g. a video recording of the face to analyse expression ...


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This is only a partial answer (since the question scope is so large) but it is one of my favorite empirical findings. It turns out that simply watching your favorite team win or lose has physiological impacts. Specifically, if a team you are rooting for wins, your testosterone levels will increase, and they will decrease if your team loses. This was ...



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