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2

I'd like to add some nuance here. While not isolated to reading emotion in the eyes, consider these images from Hillel Aviezer's work (1, 2): In all four images above, the face is the same. What changes is the body language and objects in the scene. What also changes is the emotions you perceive in each image (in alphabetical order: disgust, anger, ...


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Drawing/painting naked female bodies may be nothing more than another form of sexual upheaval attached to artistic expression. It's a socially acceptable form, as opposed to obscenities in language which are sexual expressions attached to anger; but both may contain an element of spitefulness against a cultural tabu. Both forms are ways of exposing one's own ...


2

One factor that should be considered is the culture surrounding casual sex and the social judgments that men and women may experience as a result of casual sex. Conley, Ziegler, and Moors (2012) report a series of experiments conducted on an American university campus that show that women who accept offers of casual sex are perceived more negatively on a ...


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Haha, I don't think you realized how many topics you touched with this question. Let me see if I can answer the most important of them. Love is a bad word to use when describing behaviour, because it means different things for pretty much every person. So let's talk affection. Al mammals have the capacity for affection, and it drives them to want to be ...


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This answer might come a bit late.. But are you looking for Blunted Affect? Wikipedia's definition goes like this: "[It] is a clinical term to define a lack of emotional reactivity (affect display) in an individual. It manifests as a failure to express feelings either verbally or non-verbally, especially when talking about issues that would normally be ...


2

It is a biological/chemical response. Once in a stressful situation, you're not supposed to act smart or able to solve a rubik cube, but punch whatever is getting you angry and/or getting the hell out of the place. The adrenaline, and other stuff, discharge are responsible for increased blood pressure, heart rate and what-not (Nordqvist, 2013): Anger ...


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It appears that there's been a lot of research done by USC professor Antonio Damasio on the importance of emotions. There's some fascinating case studies and interviews that are worth reading and listening to, but the short summary, as I understand it, is: Emotions are important because they end up directing reason. Without emotion, there are simply too ...


4

Are emotions really necessary for survival? No, not for survival; lots of living things around us without even a brain. Did emotions provide an evolutionary advantage in the past? The areas of the brain we associate with emotion were around far back in our evolutionary past - long before conscious reasoning appeared. Emotions are still an important part ...


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This question becomes more complicated if we think in terms of "emotions" (e.g., angry, happy, sad, afraid, etc.) than in terms of "affect" (positive and negative feelings, high and low arousal). I'll start with affect and move on to emotions. An affective state tags an object with a certain value--and it does so very quickly (e.g., Pham, 2007). For ...


2

Short answer Emotions are not necessary for survival, but they may provide evolutionary advantages. Background Although crocodiles cry, they do not feel any remorse in killing their prey when shedding tears doing so (they empty their lachrymals when snapping their jaws shut). Given their relative brain size we can expect (but never know) that they do not ...



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