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After a quick google search I (surprisingly) found that it already has an application: the No More Woof headset. I believe the most important part is that you have a headset that fits and does not move when a dog walks or turns his head. Then it does not matter that much where and how the electrodes are oriented. The only thing you need to do is map the ...


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If "brain waves" produce a time-varying electric potential as shown on the EEG, then as far as I know electromagnetic waves are present. I was taught that you cannot have a time varying electric potential without creating an electromagnetic wave. You can try browsing wiki explanation https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maxwell%27s_equations, but the main idea is ...


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Short answer Brainwaves are typically associated with the electroencephalogram, which is a signal mainly composed of potential differences generated in the superficial layers of the brain. Potential differences represent electric fields and do not represent electromagnetic (EM) radiation. EM radiation is build up of packets of energy (photons). EM radiation ...


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Short answer Brain waves are not electromagnetic waves. Long answer Measured brain activity, as you already mentioned, is the result of individual neurons firing. The activity exists, in fact, of two parts. First of all, there are the action potentials (APs). APs are current flow within a neuron from one end to the other. The magnitude of these APs (and ...


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The P300 wave is a positive deflection in the human event-related potential (ERP). A common experiment in which it is analyzed is the "oddball" paradigm, where a subject detects an occasional target stimulus in a regular train of standard stimuli. The P300 wave only occurs if the subject is actively engaged in the task of detecting the targets and its ...


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What Christiaan says true. It is sheer impossible. However, there is technology that cán "see your mental pictures". In a TED-talk by Mary-Lou Jepsen she explains how fMRI and machine learning algorithms are used to recreate viewed or imagined videos from brain activity. It is a really neat TED-talk and definitely worth watching. What is possible using EEG ...


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I agree with Christiaan. Similar movements are stored nearby and are thus difficult to distinguish (see How are movements stored in the brain? ), even more so with the spatial resolution of EEG. What I would like to add is that for imagery to be motor imagery, you have to imagine the movement in first person perspective. Imaging someone else to execute a ...


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As far as I know, brain-computer interfaces based on EEG use motor-cortex responses by asking the subject to imagine body movements. E.g., a left-arm movement imagination would translate to moving the robot to the left etc. In other words, imagining the robot going left will probably result in a diffuse, poor-defined brain response, while imagined motor ...



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