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The advantage (at the current state of the technology) is that you don't need to use a remote with your hands, so the paralyzed could move their exoskeletons, for instance. For now, there is still the downside that the the device needs to be trained and the commands that can be read are rather simplistic. However, in the future these types of devices will ...


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You can't. Flatline EEG is how brain death is defined, and while it may be possible to induce an eye blink in a deceased human, I am sure ethics will not approve, and it won't be scientifically satisfactory. even in the case of a real flatline EEG, there will always be some remaining residual activity (albeit very weak), such as line noise. However, ...


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Antoine Tremblay has just released an advanced analysis toolbox: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/psyp.12299/abstract It's missing about half the features on your list, although fundamentally, spectral density is a simple task and LORETA is a stand-alone package anyways (although similar approaches, e.g. general CSD estimation, are implemented in ...


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Point by point: The Melon headband has three electrodes. Our primary electrode is on the forehead region known as FP1, where Melon can monitor brainwave activity from the prefrontal cortex. The problem with this is that electricity doesn't work like that. Current always flows between two points, and our electrodes measure the potential between two ...


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This type of sensor is hardly revolutionary, it seems that the integration and miniaturization are the key differences between say Melon, or this, or a 7-point sensor such as Muse, which supposedly monitors alpha and beta waves, and is already in production. Note that the 10/20 System is as old as I am: 30+ years. Additionally, it is an analog, dumb device, ...



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