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16

It seems like somebody's done a lot of literature pooling already: Is Rationality Teachable? Among influences mentioned are statistics, logic training, and debiasing. There's also a book that summarized findings: Teaching Critical Thinking: Some Lessons From Cognitive Science Tim van Gelder College Teaching Vol. 53, Iss. 1, 2005 ABSTRACT: This ...


11

There is a classic paper by Halpern (1998) on the topic. From the abstract: Numerous studies have shown that critical thinking, defined as the deliberate use of skills and strategies that increase the probability of a desirable outcome, can be learned in ways that promote transfer to novel contexts. A 4-part empirically based model is proposed to guide ...


10

A popular lit review [1] discusses some game concepts that have been empirically tested to support the idea of gamification. In some cases, these may be very hard to quantify. For instance, the article cites fantasy as one gaming characteristic that engages gamers. Other characteristics, such as having clear, well defined rules/goals seem easier to ...


10

There are a few videos and some links here on gamification in education. Sarah Smith- Robbins has an article on gamification in education. http://www.gamifyingeducation.org/ is a website devoted to the topic; the site has a listing of research papers here.


10

The first Google hit for "creativity training psychology" (Chamorro-Premuzic, 2013) seems to answer your question pretty thoroughly. Prof. Chamorro-Premuzic is a pretty formidable psychologist, so it's no surprise coming from him! To quote the post: In short, creativity is not 100% malleable, but it can be affected by deliberate interventions. People's ...


9

I found the actual report on the PBS NewsHour. The program which teaches children empathy using infants is known as Roots of Empathy. It's Wikipedia article states: The Roots of Empathy program effectiveness has been evaluated nine different times by independent reviewers. Overall, the results were positive. The results showed that students who ...


9

A recent senior thesis by Schoen (2012) addressed this exact question. Students watched a filmed lecture and were randomly assigned to take notes with either by typing or handwriting. After the lecture, students were given a few distractor tasks, and then given a retention test. Other students were assigned to take notes from a textbook, instead of a ...


8

An excellent question! A 2011 paper in Science by Karpicke and Blunt in the Cognition and Learning Lab at Purdue University gets at this issue. They offer that: "Concept mapping is considered an active learning task, and it serves as an elaborative study activity when students construct concept maps in the presence of the materials they are learning. ...


8

I'm afraid I have to disagree with Mozibur Ullah's answer. Instead of talking about Plato, Socrates and Picasso I'll mention one, incredibly creative and intelligent person: John Cleese. Telling people how to be creative is easy, it's only being it what's difficult. Creativity is not a talent. It is a way of operating. Creativity is not an ability ...


7

Concept mapping is a way of reviewing the material, depending on the study it may be significantly better than other forms of review, though not all studies I read found that superiority. The most popular theory for its claimed superiority is that it also organizes the information better for recall; most of the papers that found concept mapping better than ...


6

The research literature on stress in general and burnout in particular would be relevant. The stress literature is massive and there are studies that have a particular focus on students. For example Jacobs and Dodd did a study on college student burnout: Measures of social support (Multidimen- sional Scale of Perceived Social Support), personality ...


6

Relationship between study time and performance Plant et al (2004) review the literature of studies that have correlated average time spent studying and variables such as GPA. They report a couple of correlational studies in the literature that found small positive correlations (e.g., $r=.18, r=.23$). They make two main points: (a) academic performance is ...


6

Learning Styles There is a large literature on learning styles particularly in educational psychology. See for example, the wikipedia page on learning styles. You will soon discover that there are many different taxonomies of learning styles. Thus, there are certainly more than three "theorised" learning styles. However, more importantly, there have been ...


6

Yes, brain power is eroded via a lack of practice. This occurs through the processes called synaptic pruning and brain plasticity. I will leave you with a very basic answer as I am unsure of your level of understanding of cognitive processes. First, you must understand neurons. Then, you can begin to understand synaptic pruning and brain plasticity. ...


6

Suppose a person learns a subject in college and waits for 10 years before learning it again. An exam is given one week after the person relearns the subject. So in this case, the ISI (inter-study interval) is very long compared to the RI (retention interval). The person will definitely forget some of the material after the 10 years. So how long they would ...


6

No, social psychology is not a subfield of educational psychology. Social psychology is one of the basic disciplines of psychology (like e.g. personality psychology or developmental psychology), whereas educational psychology is an applied discipline (like e.g. clinical psychology or industrial/organizational psychology). A sort of standard definition of ...


5

Not using your brain might well be deleterious, but it's impossible not to use your brain unless you're in a coma or something. There are some cool studies on plasticity (see Shayna's answer above) in amputees, where the parts of the brain that control the amputated limb go unused but are taken up by other functions instead. However, "perpetual brain ...


5

There are two theoretical constructions that may be of use to you: Scaffolding "...what the child is able to do in collaboration today he will be able to do independently tomorrow" -Vygotsky You are right to graduate the level of difficulty of problems the students encounter. Intuitively, a student has before her a level of task which, although ...


5

Pashler et al It is worth reading the critical review of learning styles by Pashler et al. To quote some of the summary: Our review of the literature disclosed ample evidence that children and adults will, if asked, express preferences about how they prefer information to be presented to them. There is also plentiful evidence arguing that people ...


5

I'd recommend checking out Wikipedia's article on autodidacticism for a start. This might give you a better sense of the context surrounding the word, and whether it really means so much as you feel it does. My first impression is that this is not much more than a semantic issue (but I have a second impression, which I'll get to next). The literal definition ...


4

General literature on training and educational program evaluation In general, you would want to read up about program evaluation in general, and educational program evaluation, and training evaluation in particular. With regards to the educational context I found this article online. With regards to training evaluation, you could check out Kraiger et al ...


4

Is there a name for the phenomena of not putting effort into study because of fear of failure which in turn results in actual failure? Yes, this is called self-handicapping. Self-handicapping is the process by which people avoid effort in the hopes of keeping potential failure from hurting self-esteem. What causes this? The main ...


4

If you don't have a decent amount of education in psychology already, I wouldn't recommend diving straight into journals...but I wouldn't recommend you don't either. If you want to check them out, I'd say the only harm is the cost and the chance of getting discouraged, so first of all, I'd recommend this: don't get discouraged! You're on the right track. The ...


4

Consider this, communication is more than 50% nonverbal. Studies vary (from 93% nonverbal to 75%) and the actual percentage is difficult to interpret, but it is generally accepted that most of the communication is nonverbal. That being said, a book is only written word and content, whereas a lecture is dynamic, versatile, and incorporates much of the ...


3

In short, I'd say the minimum requirement is to understand which behaviours you are influencing and why. Before you consider which game techniques to use, consider the 'story' of the product/service. Each story includes: Actor/s. Who are your targets? These actors are motivated by something. This is what your game should leverage. There is a goal. What ...


3

I think it's important to keep in mind the different effects that one might achieve using mind mapping, with regard to the way mind maps are being evaluated in the literature mentioned so far. While retrieval ability is easy to measure and certainly a useful metric that approximates one important aspect of learning in an academic setting, retrieval isn't ...



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