Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

12

You have to break down the question in two parts. (1) Is it possible to entrain brain oscillations by presenting oscillating lights or tones? Yes, it is possible to evoke "response phenomena" in the brain by presenting participants with oscillatory stimuli. The technical term for this phenomenon is "steady state evoked potential" and it was demonstrated ...


5

Until peer-reviewed data on the topic is published, all we have to go on is blog posts from vision and display researchers. The best posts I've seen so far are: Artal, P. (2012) Is the display resolution of the new iPad adequate for the eye? Artal, P. (2012) What have in common the Apple “Retina” display and our retina? Probably, only the name. ...


4

I've used the Zeo (http://www.myzeo.com/sleep/). It seems to work pretty well. It tracks which stage of sleep you are using a very basic EEG. There are some details on how it operates here: http://radar.oreilly.com/2009/10/how-the-zeo-sleep-device-works.html As I said, I've used it in the past and from what I can tell, it seems to be pretty accurate, ...


3

The Emotiv system has been evaluated in a research setting. Badcock et al. (2013) recorded EEG activity with the Emotiv EPOC and a more conventional laboratory system simultaneously, and found that both systems produced similar results for ERPs with a relatively high signal-to-noise ratio, but it was harder to detect less reliable signals with the EPOC than ...


3

The gold standard of sleep studies is polysomnography- using multiple sensors together to score sleep stages. It's very expensive and requires a lab. A night in a sleep lab costs about 3000$, last time I checked. Actigraphy is a cheaper way of monitoring sleep by looking at the users motion. When 19 out of 20 minutes are scored as "no activity", the first ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible