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Cross-race effect in facial processing As @analystic has noted, there is substantial research documenting what is sometimes called the "cross-race effect": Cross-race effect (sometimes called cross-race bias, other-race bias or own-race bias) is the tendency for people of one race to have difficulty recognizing and processing faces and facial ...


8

There are many reasons why men may find 'not-entirely-natural' women more attractive. One reason, perhaps obvious, is simply based on evolutionary preferences. A rosy complexion may indicate good health, whereas larger breasts may signify fertility. Whether fake or not, women use makeup and surgery to accentuate features that men already find attractive. ...


6

At one time Mauritanians considered fat women more attractive than thin. Unless Mauritanian men were born different to other men, surely we have to suppose that Mauritanian men were trained that way. Sources: BBC News: Mauritania's 'wife-fattening' farm , and Wikipedia: Body mass in attractivness


5

Culture reference effects Heine et al (2002) discuss how people in different cultures often answer questions relative to a reference group in their own culture. Thus, for example, if a culture is more collectivistic in general, measured cultural differences may less when people within a culture answer test items relative to their own cultural reference ...


5

While I don't know of the Milgram studies being replicated cross cultural there's an older, less severe conformity study by Asch. Those use less authoritarian and more group conformity pressure. Eastern cultures showed higher conformity and western showed falling conformity over time. Bond, R. & Smith, Peter. (1996). Culture and conformity: A ...


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The first thing to note is that the study was not published as a peer-reviewed journal article. It was published as a blog post. Thus, it has not gone through a peer review process. While the reader can function as the reviewer, the article does not follow the structure of a journal article. As such, there is an inadequate description of the method in the ...


5

This is probably an example of the "cross-race effect", in which people of one ethnic group (you're talking ethnicity, not culture here) have trouble distinguishing between members of another ethnic group. It comes down to familiarity basically - if we are more familiar with the features of a white face (for example) then we'll be able to notice minor ...


4

This is in reply to your first question. Taste – in food, music, and sex – is in part a result of imprinting. You find women or men attractive that are like your parents or the community you grew up in because of sexual imprinting (e.g. Aronsson, 2011). Aronsson writes of a sensitive period where this imprinting happens, but I am not so sure that the ...


4

There is a 2009 article by Burger that reportedly reviews the Milgram experiment and all known replications. You might want to read through the replications carefully to see whether any such studies were performed in an eastern cultural context. Possibly even a close reading of the studies might suggest how much results vary across settings. I found one ...


4

Long story short: at least in facial affect perception/expression, there is not a definitive answer to this. The field is only just beginning to get a handle on the fact that what have been long thought of as "universal" expressions of emotion don't seem to be, so there is considerably less work on how exactly culture affects these expressions. However, ...


3

Reminds me a bit of existential therapy and humanistic psychology in general. Unconditional positive regard and motivational interviewing both insist on approaching undesirable feelings from the client's perspective without imposing fixes or changes on the person through pressure or blunt confrontationality. Existential theory even presumes major, inevitable ...


3

Anthropologists have shown that all cultures have the same "amount" and "intensity" of modesty, shame and sexual excitability. What differs are clothing and behavioral habits, and therefore what is considered modest, what causes shame, and what causes sexual arousal. The most extensive meta-analytic study on this topic is Hans-Peter Duerr's five volume Der ...


2

It sounds like you're describing cultural differences in the fundamental attribution error, which, according to Wikipedia, is: People's tendency to place an undue emphasis on internal characteristics to explain someone else's behavior in a given situation, rather than considering external factors. It does not explain interpretations of one's own ...


2

The difference between collectivistic and individualistic cultures is one of the recurring topics in introductory lectures in Social Psychology, I-O Psychology and related fields. The most widely cited book on culture is Cultures and organizations: Software of the mind by Hofstede, Hofstede and Minkov (2010), originally published by Hofstede and Hofstede in ...


2

While I can't, and won't make any comment on the accusations of racism (I think the comments below your question answer that quite well), the Western/Analytic vs. Eastern/Holistic dichotomy is pretty well established and supported by studies in cognitive and social psychological literatures. This may be a little different to what you had in mind, as your ...


1

The World Values Survey seems like a good starting point for examining nation level life satisfaction and then correlating it with other indicators. Diener (2000) summarises this research on mean levels of life satisfaction for selected nations from the World Values Survey (World Values Study Group, 1994), conducted with representative ...


1

We should differentiate between the behavior aspects of attraction and the physical aspects. Behavior involves what bathing suit someone chooses to wear, what makeup they wear, how they carry their body, etc. Regarding the behavior aspect of attraction: Judith Butler argues that it is a culturally-constructed performance. Behavior varies by culture. For ...



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