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10

What is interesting about this phenomenon is that it runs counter to the scarcity principle. Countless research has shown that the more scarce a commodity is, the more desirable it becomes. This is often capitalized on in marketing ("limited edition" and so on). Thus, the last donut should actually be even more attractive than one of many donuts. So ...


10

It is "paradox of choice". See these resources: The paradox of choice: why more is less By Barry Schwartz (Google Books) Excerpts from the above book by Barry Schwartz (.doc format) Positive Psychology in Practice chapter 6 Doing Better but Feeling Worse: The Paradox of Choice by Barry Schwartz and Andrew Ward (.pdf format) I actually haven't been able ...


9

The problem is that this doesn't fall under any of these conditioning definitions in behaviourism because the store isn't really trying to condition a response. They're just trying to get you to do one thing once. The behavioural techniques you mention are designed so that you get an organism to make a conditioned response spontaneously whenever the ...


8

If that same effect is happening with the "99% fat free" labeling, consumers would over-perceive the amount of fat I think you are misunderstanding the desired effect here. I don't see how "99% fat free" would lead to the impression that a product contains a lot of fat. My read is, "This is 99% fat free! That's really good!" as opposed to "1% fat" which ...


6

The study design sounds pretty good. Some of the good things you are proposing: Using a repeated measures design will give you more statistical power than a between subjects design, which is particularly useful when your sample size is small. Randomising or counterbalancing for order should mostly control for order effects. Double blind will focus the ...


4

Sexual attraction has mostly but not only a biological roots. Can this particular woman bear healthy children for me? Do I want this man? Can he be a good father? In a few seconds, someone can evaluate this simply in his/her mind (evaluate such factors as: height, weight, balance, hips, hair, smell, voice, how healthy the person looks, etc.) Also, social ...


4

This is just an elaboration on my comment that Sanford et al (2002) might be relevant to the question. If you don't have access Tony Sanford indicates that "To obtain a copy of any of these papers, please email." The study reports three experiments. In experiment 2 they found experimentally that there was a preference for the "% fat free" format. ...


4

There are two factors at work in what is being researched: interest and money. Researchers research what they find interesting. So if you can interest someone in your idea, then chances are that they will want to research it. But wether they will actually do that research will depend on wether it seems more interesting to them than what they are currently ...


4

Not really my area of expertise, but I find that a very interesting question and googled a bit for answers. EFL (Entrepreneurial Finance Lab) is a for-profit company claiming to be the market leader in psychometric loan scoring. The company has been spun out of a research project of the Center of International Development at Harvard University. EFL's ...


3

This is a cultural/situational phenomenon. I know that in my parents' generation (which grew up with poverty), it is common courtesy to never take the last piece of cake/whatever. The host always has to make sure there's plenty, because 1 piece left means that people are still hungry. Nowadays most people (in my culture and generation) are not so hesitant. ...


2

I am not aware of any use in using "high audio frequencies" in commercials, but there is a history of making commercials louder (presumably to attract attention). There are laws prohibiting increasing the loudness of commercials (e.g., CALM Act). Increasing the loudness, without remotely adjusting the volume on the TV is not a trivial thing and potentially ...


2

Grabner-Kräuter et al (2003) suggest that Lack of trust is one of the most frequently cited reasons for consumers not purchasing from Internet vendors. References Grabner-Kräuter, S., & Kaluscha, E. A. (2003). Empirical research in on-line trust: a review and critical assessment. International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 58(6), 783-812. ...


1

A few options. You could start with an open ended question and then move to closed ended questions for leading brands and perhaps any other options listed in the previously open ended process. You could use an input box that takes text and shows partial matches which people then select (e.g., a bit like in Facebook when selecting a friend)


1

it seems that you can use randomization of options to decrease bias. That is, present every respondent with multiple choices but in completely random order. Also, bias might be directly tested on two groups, say A&B. Only difference will be the order of available answers. This manual seems to be very helpful: Handbook of Survey Research, Ch.9 Question ...


1

"Building rapport" is not actually A technique, but a general phrase that may cover a whole lot of specific techniques. "Rapport" does not normally occur in scientific contexts, it mostly occurs within anecdotal subjects like sales and NLP. Individual sales techniques and NLP is usually not based on science at all, so they do not care for what is ...


1

The 'hardwired' things we value in partners include not only physical and psychological suitability for procreating, but also social status. Thus, any visible indicators that we associate with high status are also perceived as sexy even if they don't have no direct match to anything else, and mass media can affect what properties indicators are perceived ...


1

In HCI terms, which is where I come from, this would probably be called information overload. It is the situation where a person is presented with so much information that they cannot process all of it successfully. In Cognitive terms, the term probably works best because it is caused, I believe, by insufficient short term memory being available to ...



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