Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

Apparently I have a proclivity for long answers, but I thought I'd respond given the viewership on this question. We can whittle your question down to a more general form: Can my subjective experience be categorized? The answer to that basic question is of course! You made a categorization of how you felt in that moment, and you concluded that you had a ...


0

We have all been in this 'state' if it can be called that. It existed before we were conceived. However it is impossible to imagine being something we are not. I cannot imagine being a dolphin and perceiving the world through echolocation. A person blind from birth cannot imagine the colour green. For the same reason, a living person cannot imagine being ...


1

The unusual feeling you've described here could be the variation of so called dissociative experiences, when a person's perception of the surrounding world and himself is distorted and therefore could evoke intense fear (and visa-versa). Quite often it could be the result of traumatic events in the past, which are not dangerous for a person in the present, ...


0

Most would call this an 'awakening'. There was a fad some years ago for going on courses to promote this state of awareness. I know because I went on some (and they worked!). The techniques vary but typically involved a repeated questioning of the 'goldfish bowl' and state of semi-hypnosis that we all tend to inhabit day-to-day. Some, such as "The Forum" ...


0

From my experience with Lucid Dreaming, a practice where people seek to be consciously aware in their dreams, searching for the term "lucid" or "lucidity" would be a good place to start. Lucid dreams vary wildly in their quality, content and level of control. Some very highly sought after lucid dreams, which are colloquially known as "epic" feature those ...


1

I feel that the label of consciousness is merely a semantic distinction that belongs to the realm of philosophy, not neuropsychology. Like Noam Chomsky mentioned in one of his talks hosted by Lawrence Krauss - we could also ask ourselves whether animals (e.g. dogs) are conscious. I'm not exactly sure, he mentioned that birds are said to "fly" in Enlgish but ...


2

Short answer: We don't know. Long answer: There are a few major lines of thinking on the subject currently. Cognitive closure: One common argument is that this question is simply not answerable - at least not by humans. By this view, it is possible that the creation of an artificial intelligence that even resembles humans sufficiently to suggest ...


1

This question has perplexed me for quite a while now. The problem with declaring an artificially intelligent machine 'conscious' is the very definition of consciousness. A quick google search for the definition for 'consciousness' returns 'the state of being awake and aware of one's surroundings'. This definition in my opinion is too vague to be extendable ...



Top 50 recent answers are included