Hot answers tagged

10

When you dream you're in REM sleep (rapid eye movement). REM sleep is only slightly more "deep" than stage 1 of non-REM which means it's not that hard to wake you up in the first place. Dying in a dream is a stressful event, which causes your brain to release adrenaline. You can't sleep and have an adrenaline rush at the same time so you wake up. These ...


10

Short answer: Because areas of the brain needed for remembering are turned off during dreaming. Dream Amnesia: The process of converting perception into a memory construct that can be stored is called encoding, and is essentially the same during both wakefulness and sleep: That is, the same factors can hamper or promote successful encoding when awake or ...


5

State dependent memory could play a role in quickly forgetting dreams after awakening. See my question here: What is the scientific term for unexpected, spontaneous dream recall? I ask about a phenomenon where dream recall happens much later potentially weeks or months after awakening. I would venture to hypothesize that Melatonin might play a role as a ...


5

Assuming your question is "Is person's ego a projection of the responses of their amygdala onto the conscious experience?", I think it would translate to "Does the amygdala determines or houses the ego". In that light, the question hinges on the meaning of ego. Given the question is asked at Cognitive Sciences SE, I assume the ego is "The part of the mind ...


4

It is something of an oversimplification to say that there are separate visual pathways for both color and shape. There are many cells, even in V1, which are selective for both colour and shape (or at least orientation). While there are regions more sensitive to some features than others, there are plenty of neurons which combine features. It is also ...


4

Short answer On the basis of a cursory literature review, I conclude that Jospeh's observations were correct, but his conclusions that a callosotomy can result in a dual consciousness were far stretched. Background First off, I'm not an expert on this topic, but I will give my referenced opinion anyway, as there is no answer yet to this question; Below are ...


3

From a quick search online I see no reason why you distantiate what you describe from auditory hallucinations: a form of hallucination that involves perceiving sounds without auditory stimulus. Given the article you link to, which arguably does address your question (yes, some people report experiencing this), you mainly seem to be concerned that ...


3

Neither rational nor logical "...there is overwhelming evidence that Humans cannot be [rational]" - Daniel Kahneman (Thinking Fast and Slow). To begin with, the brain is neither rational nor logical as you may think (to a large extent it is little rational and its logic is completely fuzzy). A perfectly rational and logical organ would not be able to ...


2

I don't think there's a real answer to the question, but I find it fascinating. Have a look at this really nice paper, too. They asked lucid dreamers to approach other dream characters and ask them to do simple maths. (Not because they were interested in lucid dreaming per se, they just needed somebody to be able to decide what they would dream). The study ...


2

Not everyone forgets gravity in dreams. I'm speaking out of my experience with lucid dreaming, which allows thousands of people to act consciously in their dreams. This allows them to examine dream concepts in more details, as well as perform experiments. There's a lucid dreaming flying technique, which is all about manipulating the gravity within a dream....


2

The general consensus of the scientific community would be that the human heart is not capable of consciousness. The machinery behind consciousness is not well understood, of course, and there is quite a bit of debate, but it is thought that some minimum level of complexity is required in order for consciousness to arise. The human heart, while containing ...


2

Priming involves the perception of similar elements between information. The similarity between information influences the memory as it has already been primed by previous memory traces. I do know of a study that suggests that when simple contours of an image are primed before complex versions of those contours, those contours are rated more positively (...


2

If by consciously perceived, you mean recognizing a feature (and possible reactions accordingly), there are several tasks to be considered that seem to cause delays: Saccades and eye movements: During saccades we are blind, so we must wait a little to bypass a saccade so participants are able to see. It is called saccade masking. Transmission: neurons are ...


2

The evidence in support of binaural beats as a therapeutic tool is sketchy: Is there scientific evidence on the benefits of binaural beats? Given our lack of understanding of if binaural beats can cause entrainment in the brain, never mind how they cause entrainment, it is not possibly to make conclusions about how the binaural beat would affect the autistic ...


2

Sleep and dreaming is somewhat of a specialty of mind, so I can comment on the wake-sleep-wake transition. People typically love the feeling of relaxation and warmth associated with sleep. Waking up naturally can feel just as good - imagine lounging in bed on a Sunday morning without having to get out of bed. Waking due to alarm is an abrupt event which is ...


1

Most people (including myself) do not hear or speak with inner voices, but it is not unheard of, see Hearing Voices Network. Ego State theory is a theory of multiple personality facets (ego states). In their book "Ego States: Theory and Therapy", John G. and Helen H. Watkins transcribe several hypnosis sessions, where they communicate with different ego ...


1

I have never heard a thing like an "inner voice". I take it for a figure of speech. It might be interesting to compare linguality factors. I am bilingual. Maybe there is no way my brain would produce anything like a "voice" (it would have to speak two languages at the same time). Obviously, I'm not complaining. Many people have endophasia, but is not a "...


1

This reminds me of a similar question I answered a few weeks ago. Not exactly the same situation, but the leading theory is that it comes down to complexity. I'll start out by saying that we don't know for sure what animals are conscious or even what consciousness is, exactly. In fact, it's not even possible to prove without a doubt that you or I are ...


1

In a famous experiment Luigi Galvani conducted in 1780, he observed that a dead frog leg was twitching when electricity was applied to its nerves. Following your line of argument, electricity would be the meta-physical phenomena that gives rise to life. Brainwaves are the signature of neural activity; we capture them through electrical measurements. We ...


1

You have asked an excellent question. However, this innocently short question involves many dimensions: the philosophical discussion of consciousness, the neurobiological basis of motor movements, reflexive actions, relationship between sensory and motor areas in the brain etc. I'll try my best to elaborate on my answer: meanwhile, your best bet would be to ...


1

What do you mean exactly with 'processes'? If you're thinking about actual movements made during editing (i.e. tiping), this science paper might help. Very simply put, they showed skilled typist have two kinds of control processes, one conscious and one unconscious. (Science 29 October 2010: Vol. 330 no. 6004 pp. 683-686 DOI: 10.1126/science.1190483)


1

Joseph's description of his patients fascinated me. The concept of two minds fighting for control isn't a new one to me, but was previously restricted to science fiction and/or horror genres. How strange to find a real-life example of it. What I find unsatisfying about the explanation of "reduced inhibitory control of the dominant hemisphere over the non-...


1

Yes we can. The state is nowadays called 'Lucid Dreaming' and it is not a theory or New Age superstition. It has been scientifically proven first by Dr Keith Hearn and consequently by Dr Stephen Laberge. They both used variations of the same method, namely having the dreamer produce prearranged, measurable signals from inside the dream once the become lucid. ...


1

On/off is indeed not the commonest view of consciousness. In Hindu philosophical circles, consciousness is thought of as continuous across living systems. Humans have 'budding'consciousness, (plus free will), animals 'shuttered' and plants 'covered'consciousness, and these are points along a continuum. (Reference example: Hinduism and Science, by T D ...


1

I can't give you an informed response to questions 1 and 2 though I do know that parasitic wasps inject toxin into a spider, lay an egg on the back of the spider and cause it to spin a web that will protect the egg. So some form of behavioural control of spiders is possible. Spider brains are much simpler than human brains but there was a paper by ...


1

I believe an overactive amygdala certainly plays a pivitol role defines ones ego. As the amygdala is part of the limbic system. An overactive limbic system has been linked to depression, obsessive compulsive disorder and depression. While I do believe the amygdala does play a small part in defining the ego, I believe other parts of the limbic system, play ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible