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7

Short answer: Because areas of the brain needed for remembering are turned off during dreaming. Dream Amnesia: The process of converting perception into a memory construct that can be stored is called encoding, and is essentially the same during both wakefulness and sleep: That is, the same factors can hamper or promote successful encoding when awake or ...


7

When you dream you're in REM sleep (rapid eye movement). REM sleep is only slightly more "deep" than stage 1 of non-REM which means it's not that hard to wake you up in the first place. Dying in a dream is a stressful event, which causes your brain to release adrenaline. You can't sleep and have an adrenaline rush at the same time so you wake up. These ...


5

Assuming your question is "Is person's ego a projection of the responses of their amygdala onto the conscious experience?", I think it would translate to "Does the amygdala determines or houses the ego". In that light, the question hinges on the meaning of ego. Given the question is asked at Cognitive Sciences SE, I assume the ego is "The part of the mind ...


5

Your question is about the hard problem of consciousness, which is basically the question of how qualia can be explained in a mechanistic way. As alluded to by the name of the problem, it's hard to give a satisfactory answer. The answer right now is: we don't know. There are some theories about how qualia and consciousness could have a neural basis (see ...


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Note: This is not intended to set a verbosity standard for answers, but to give a comprehensive example of what kind of information I am looking in order to further clarify the question. An answer including only a parallel of the principles of ecological psychology subsection would be sufficient, for example. Ecological psychology Ecological Psychology ...


4

It is something of an oversimplification to say that there are separate visual pathways for both color and shape. There are many cells, even in V1, which are selective for both colour and shape (or at least orientation). While there are regions more sensitive to some features than others, there are plenty of neurons which combine features. It is also ...


4

State dependent memory could play a role in quickly forgetting dreams after awakening. See my question here: What is the scientific term for unexpected, spontaneous dream recall? I ask about a phenomenon where dream recall happens much later potentially weeks or months after awakening. I would venture to hypothesize that Melatonin might play a role as a ...


3

Neither rational nor logical "...there is overwhelming evidence that Humans cannot be [rational]" - Daniel Kahneman (Thinking Fast and Slow). To begin with, the brain is neither rational nor logical as you may think (to a large extent it is little rational and its logic is completely fuzzy). A perfectly rational and logical organ would not be able to ...


3

Apparently I have a proclivity for long answers, but I thought I'd respond given the viewership on this question. We can whittle your question down to a more general form: Can my subjective experience be categorized? The answer to that basic question is of course! You made a categorization of how you felt in that moment, and you concluded that you had a ...


3

I don't think inverted prism goggles would be a satisfactory way to empirically test the thought experiment. A key axiom of the argument is that there are no physical changes to our brains or bodies; only the qualia have changed. In a goggles design, there would be a clear physical locus of the change (and we might reasonably call this part of your body for ...


3

Short answer: We don't know. Long answer: There are a few major lines of thinking on the subject currently. Cognitive closure: One common argument is that this question is simply not answerable - at least not by humans. By this view, it is possible that the creation of an artificial intelligence that even resembles humans sufficiently to suggest ...


3

This question has been unanswered for a long time and I will attempt to address the issues posed not one by one, as there are a great many questions, but with an overall working of the sensory nervous system with respect to topographic mapping. Moreover, the question uses a great many "suppose ifs" that have never, and most likely will never or cannot be ...


2

I can't tell you the exact underlying mechanism unfortunately. I can analyze the illusion so as to approximate an answer. You can see that the effect is virtually absent when the white squares on the two rows are nearly similarly sized (rook - pawn). The effect is biggest when the white surfaces are most unequal (king - pawn). Additionally, to me, the ...


2

Short answer Consciousness is different between individuals and can change over time. Background Nelkin (1997) provides the following definition of consciousness: When philosophers and psychologists think about consciousness, they generally focus on one or more of three features: phenomenality (how experiences feel), intentionality (that experiences are ...


2

I feel that the label of consciousness is merely a semantic distinction that belongs to the realm of philosophy, not neuropsychology. Like Noam Chomsky mentioned in one of his talks hosted by Lawrence Krauss - we could also ask ourselves whether animals (e.g. dogs) are conscious. I'm not exactly sure, he mentioned that birds are said to "fly" in Enlgish but ...


2

The general consensus of the scientific community would be that the human heart is not capable of consciousness. The machinery behind consciousness is not well understood, of course, and there is quite a bit of debate, but it is thought that some minimum level of complexity is required in order for consciousness to arise. The human heart, while containing ...


1

On/off is indeed not the commonest view of consciousness. In Hindu philosophical circles, consciousness is thought of as continuous across living systems. Humans have 'budding'consciousness, (plus free will), animals 'shuttered' and plants 'covered'consciousness, and these are points along a continuum. (Reference example: Hinduism and Science, by T D ...


1

I believe an overactive amygdala certainly plays a pivitol role defines ones ego. As the amygdala is part of the limbic system. An overactive limbic system has been linked to depression, obsessive compulsive disorder and depression. While I do believe the amygdala does play a small part in defining the ego, I believe other parts of the limbic system, play ...


1

In a famous experiment Luigi Galvani conducted in 1780, he observed that a dead frog leg was twitching when electricity was applied to its nerves. Following your line of argument, electricity would be the meta-physical phenomena that gives rise to life. Brainwaves are the signature of neural activity; we capture them through electrical measurements. We ...


1

If by consciously perceived, you mean recognizing a feature (and possible reactions accordingly), there are several tasks to be considered that seem to cause delays: Saccades and eye movements: During saccades we are blind, so we must wait a little to bypass a saccade so participants are able to see. It is called saccade masking. Transmission: neurons are ...


1

You have asked an excellent question. However, this innocently short question involves many dimensions: the philosophical discussion of consciousness, the neurobiological basis of motor movements, reflexive actions, relationship between sensory and motor areas in the brain etc. I'll try my best to elaborate on my answer: meanwhile, your best bet would be to ...


1

What do you mean exactly with 'processes'? If you're thinking about actual movements made during editing (i.e. tiping), this science paper might help. Very simply put, they showed skilled typist have two kinds of control processes, one conscious and one unconscious. (Science 29 October 2010: Vol. 330 no. 6004 pp. 683-686 DOI: 10.1126/science.1190483)


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Not everyone forgets gravity in dreams. I'm speaking out of my experience with lucid dreaming, which allows thousands of people to act consciously in their dreams. This allows them to examine dream concepts in more details, as well as perform experiments. There's a lucid dreaming flying technique, which is all about manipulating the gravity within a ...


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I don't think there's a real answer to the question, but I find it fascinating. Have a look at this really nice paper, too. They asked lucid dreamers to approach other dream characters and ask them to do simple maths. (Not because they were interested in lucid dreaming per se, they just needed somebody to be able to decide what they would dream). The study ...


1

I can't give you an informed response to questions 1 and 2 though I do know that parasitic wasps inject toxin into a spider, lay an egg on the back of the spider and cause it to spin a web that will protect the egg. So some form of behavioural control of spiders is possible. Spider brains are much simpler than human brains but there was a paper by ...


1

The unusual feeling you've described here could be the variation of so called dissociative experiences, when a person's perception of the surrounding world and himself is distorted and therefore could evoke intense fear (and visa-versa). Quite often it could be the result of traumatic events in the past, which are not dangerous for a person in the present, ...


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Most would call this an 'awakening'. There was a fad some years ago for going on courses to promote this state of awareness. I know because I went on some (and they worked!). The techniques vary but typically involved a repeated questioning of the 'goldfish bowl' and state of semi-hypnosis that we all tend to inhabit day-to-day. Some, such as "The Forum" ...


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From my experience with Lucid Dreaming, a practice where people seek to be consciously aware in their dreams, searching for the term "lucid" or "lucidity" would be a good place to start. Lucid dreams vary wildly in their quality, content and level of control. Some very highly sought after lucid dreams, which are colloquially known as "epic" feature those ...



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