Hot answers tagged

4

Short answer On the basis of a cursory literature review, I conclude that Jospeh's observations were correct, but his conclusions that a callosotomy can result in a dual consciousness were far stretched. Background First off, I'm not an expert on this topic, but I will give my referenced opinion anyway, as there is no answer yet to this question; Below are ...


3

From a quick search online I see no reason why you distantiate what you describe from auditory hallucinations: a form of hallucination that involves perceiving sounds without auditory stimulus. Given the article you link to, which arguably does address your question (yes, some people report experiencing this), you mainly seem to be concerned that ...


3

Sleep and dreaming is somewhat of a specialty of mind, so I can comment on the wake-sleep-wake transition. People typically love the feeling of relaxation and warmth associated with sleep. Waking up naturally can feel just as good - imagine lounging in bed on a Sunday morning without having to get out of bed. Waking due to alarm is an abrupt event which is ...


1

I have never heard a thing like an "inner voice". I take it for a figure of speech. It might be interesting to compare linguality factors. I am bilingual. Maybe there is no way my brain would produce anything like a "voice" (it would have to speak two languages at the same time). Obviously, I'm not complaining. Many people have endophasia, but is not a ...


1

Joseph's description of his patients fascinated me. The concept of two minds fighting for control isn't a new one to me, but was previously restricted to science fiction and/or horror genres. How strange to find a real-life example of it. What I find unsatisfying about the explanation of "reduced inhibitory control of the dominant hemisphere over the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible