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15

You may be thinking of the Backfire Effect. When presented with logical and rational evidence disputing a strongly-held belief, most people's natural tendency is to hold on even tighter to those beliefs rather than to reassess their position. As for why it happens... that's a matter of some debate (surprise, surprise), but the general thinking seems to be ...


10

Narrative psychology is probably the go-to domain of research and theory for questions about the power and popularity of stories. Here's an excerpt from the Wikipedia page (with added emphasis): Narrative psychology is...concerned with the "storied nature of human conduct" [(Sarbin, 1986)] or...how human[s]...deal with experience by constructing stories ...


4

I'm not a cognitive science expert, but I happen to have some experience in change management / trying to convince people. There are in fact a lot of logical reasons for refusing logical and rational arguments. Suppose someone tries to share an idea with you. I will pass on the very obvious problems of "not befitting my interest" / "triggering ...


3

Some generalizations: Because Enlightenment-era rationality, with its values of liberalism and rationality and progress, has a very bad (read: hypocritical) historical track record of irrational, inegalitarian, maximally exploitative colonialism. Phrenology and Orientalism are among its crown jewels. The first chapter of Immanuel Wallerstein's ...


2

Perhaps you should think not only about 'parts of brain' but 'functions of the brain' - the feeling of sexual attraction will release multiple hormones throughout the whole brain, altering the functionality/balance for the same parts. For example, there are observed increases in risk-taking behavior (change in loss aversion for decisionmaking) for men in ...


2

Stories are an effective means for conveying ideas or messages and captivating our attention as it gives meaning to those idea's and messages, while also linking it to a themes and emotions, hence allowing us to reflect our own lives in these stories you hear. For example, imagine your self in the latter stone age where story telling was the most effective ...


2

I found one! http://straight-street.org/ Those pictos have a Creative Commons BY-SA license.


2

I am not an expert, but I have given this question a fair bit of thought. I would suggest that the tendency to oppose rational arguments in favor of maintaining beliefs depends upon what beliefs we are speaking of. There are many beliefs that do change, but these tend to revolve around mere fact. When you look at deeper belief, much of it is based upon self ...


1

Two comments. First: the "frequentist" format appears to be easier to understand than the normed percentages, at least if information needs to be chained as in Bayesian reasoning. On the other hand, probably normed percentages are easier to understand if two fractions are to be compared. Second, I'd say that you should only use percentages if your sample is ...


1

Research into auditory processing deficits is a minefield and there is no real consensus as to what is and is not a deficit in auditory processing. Further, and possibly more relevant for individuals with, or dealing with, a processing disorder, is how to treat/manage the disorder. Again, unfortunately, there is no real consensus on the issue. Ferguson ...


1

Not an expert but here would be my suggestions: We may play up to an expected persona for acceptance or not to offend the person who got it wrong. Like when people sometimes get our name wrong and we don't correct them initially as we don't want to offend or to save us embarrassment. If my handle was "car expert" and you then replied with something ...



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