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4

I don't know of a single term for it, but what you're describing is, in essence, causal inference driven by "statistics", "co-variation", "co-occurrence", or "contiguity" (the terms are largely interchangeable). If you're interested, there's a quite in-depth discussion review of theories of different theories of causal inference, including statistical ...


1

Often I listen that this phenomenon has to do with the reticular activating system of the brain. For more details: http://www.innovateus.net/health/what-function-reticular-activating-system Also these type of event are labeled as synchronicity, a concept tagged by Carl Jung (psychic phenomenon). For more details: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BX_nMwYa-nw ...


6

In general humans are excellent at seeing patterns in randomness. It seems like you have attached special meaning to certain patterns. It seems similar to the way people form superstitions. Checking the time may also be something that we do so regularly and automatically that we do not know how often we do it. And it may be that the pattern confirming ...


1

If I have understood things right, I think it is some form of 'Cognitive dissonance' According to wikipedia,"cognitive dissonance is the mental stress or discomfort experienced by an individual who holds two or more contradictory beliefs, ideas, or values at the same time, or is confronted by new information that conflicts with existing beliefs, ideas, or ...


1

Please look here for maybe good explanation: http://www.cognitiveatlas.org/task/Wisconsin_card_sorting_test This is not a test of IQ or something similar. It is more complex test of ability to find rules and follow from very limited feedback, rules that are changing in time and might be counter-intuitive. WCST is about sequential learning, adaptivity, and ...


1

What do you think about quick short-memory tests? It will measure distraction level and anxiety. Problem though is that first one must measure baseline rate of correct responses. For example, play game memory on 5x5 tile set.


2

With regard to emotions, it may be more useful to think about things in terms of interoception and attention. Interoception involves awareness of one's inner bodily sensations (e.g., pleasantness/unpleasantness, high/low arousal; Craig, 2002), and we can (rapidly) direct our attention to shifts in these sensations. Changes in our inner physiological ...


3

Mirror neurons are actually quite a contentious area in cogsci. The debate is most certainly not settled as to what role they play, and whether they even exist, in humans. In short though, my argument would be that there are no specific awareness related mirror neurons in the brain because mirror neurons themselves are awareness. Again, this is an extremely ...


2

Are you interested in mood, emotion, or affect? Or all three? Mood is considered a "diffuse" affective state, whereas emotions are "object specific." If you're interested in this distinction, look up Mathias Siemer's work. Gerald Clore also does work on mood. If you're interested in emotions, then this is a bit harder to tell you who to look up. There's ...


2

To add to the existing answers (of which @what's gets special mention), an issue I don't think has really been addressed is the statistical reason for it being so difficult to measure extremely high IQs. By design, IQ is scaled so that it's normally distributed, with a mean of 100, and a standard deviation (SD) of 15. A well known feature of the normal ...


1

You can glance at Wikipedia to get a first impression: According to Novaco, "Autonomic arousal is primarily engaged through adrenomedullary and adrenocortical hormonal activity. The secretion by the adrenal medulla of the catecholamines, epinephrine, and norepinephrine, and by the adrenal cortex of glucocorticoids provides a sympathetic system ...


3

This is actually a pretty complicated question. In general, there isn't a lot of consistent evidence that would suggest that discrete emotions like anger have stereotyped response patterns. Anger is a fairly heterogeneous emotion category, meaning that it may not look the same (and have the same outcomes) in any given situation. Consequently, there may not ...


0

A very common test of working memory is the N-back. In the N-back, the subject needs to remember what happened some number (N) of steps earlier. For example, imagine seeing the following numbers one at a time on a computer screen. Your task is to press a key whenever the number on the screen is the same as the number that was there 3 steps earlier: 1 4 5 2 ...


2

The 64 card version is just a shorter version, according to (Greve, 2001). Instead of running 128 total trials, there are only 64. The original test was developed and, crucially, normed for 128 trials. However, this version takes a long time to administer, and clinicians were interested in a shorter version. It was found that cutting the number of trials in ...


0

Focused attention meditation practices improve focus in the long term. So the improvement is difficult to asses and could probably only be found in a standardized test setting. Physical exercise however has been demonstrated to improve mental abilities in the short term (after recovery of physical exercise) levels of circulating neurotransmitter stay ...


0

The oldest and largest high IQ society in the world is Mensa. They offer membership only to those who have an IQ in the top 2%. They administer their own test to qualify those who seek membership. There are also online IQ tests that claim to be Mensa IQ tests, but I am unsure of their validity. However, Mensa only recognize the results of tests that they ...


0

Have a look at the different High IQ societies here: http://rationalwiki.org/wiki/High_IQ_society The best societies to look at for 160+ are: eximia high IQ society Mega Society GenerIQ Society Giga Society (http://www.gigasociety.com/) [I can't add more than 2 links] They all have references to test (some of it is online). For ease of access, here ...


1

Yes it is possible. In my case I lived in a country and spoke the native language until the age of 27. Then I moved to England to further pursue my career. My immediate thinking was in my native language which I converted on the fly to English as I spoke. While listening I had to do the same but just in reverse. After about 5 years I realised that I was ...


0

You can look into the research being done with ketamine as an amazingly fast antidepressant, even for those with severe treatment resistant depression. Other than that, they now think decreased neurogenesis and synaptogenesis are the more direct and important links to depression. There is also some early research into the links between depression and the ...


4

At some level, it's true that psychology reduces to biology and chemistry. If it didn't, then the widely-accepted view of physicialism/materialism would be wrong. But just because psychology can (in theory) be reduced to biochemistry, reductionism may not be the most productive way to approach the problem, for a couple of reasons: The causes of ...


1

Working memory is a term introduced in 1960 in the context of cognitive planning. It is in one sense a short-term memory, a temporary storage for short-lived information. The distinction lies in "working", which implies that the contents in memory are being worked upon. (A physicist would define work as the act of a force that leads to displacement.) Thus, ...


3

The distinction between these terms is a matter of ongoing empirical research. They form part of a set of potential taxonomical categorizations of visual memory (VM). So far proposed sub-parts of VM include: Iconic (or sensory) memory, short-term (VSTM), fragile short-term (fVSTM), working memory (VWM), and long-term (VLTM) memory. The distinction between ...


-1

Not always. If depression sets in because of repeated failure at a task (i.e. exams) or a sudden life-changing incident, it is possible to perceive the past (before the dark times) as being a lot more flowery and beautiful than it may have been in reality. This has the effect of reinforcing the feeling of having 'fallen' from a happy place in life. This ...



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