New answers tagged

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Of course, the type of data you use depends lot on what your model purports to explain. The way i take your question, you are looking for straight up artificial classification learning experiments. Is this correct? If so, John Kruschke has published several of his most important datasets on his website. I have often used these in my model testing. His '93 ...


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James E. Cutting has done a number of studies on this topic in the movie domain. Take a look at "Shot Durations, Shot Classes, and the Increased Pace of Popular Movies" (Cutting, 2015): "The pace of popular movies has increased and statements about this trend can be found in both the popular media and in scholarly works (see, for example, ...


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In a recent study, brain scans revealed that people under the influence of LSD experience images through information drawn from many parts of their brains, and not just the visual cortex at the back of the head that normally processes visual information. While under influence, regions normally segregated spoke to one another. Further images showed that other ...


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Disclaimer: Quantifying the capacity of the human brain is quiet complex as you might imagine. And although in cognitive neuroscience we often compare the brain to computers this is not an exact comparison, in many ways the brain is far more complicated and encodes information in a very different way than the comparison of CPU processors and hard-drives. The ...


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Activation of serotonin systems seems to play a role. A hallucination induced by mushrooms or LSD, for example, is an example of an artificially inflated confidence rating attached to an experience. (Both of these drugs are serotonergic.)


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The N-back task is a typical test for cognitive capabilities. There are many version of it in the Google play store. You could try a few of them and see which suits your needs best.


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I doubt trauma would create personality factors. If one is a perfectionist addicted to approval, the features might become stronger after a trauma, yet trauma itself would not be the source. Possibly, one might feel weaker after a trauma but then, self-criticism strictly is not the resolve. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self-criticism I cannot agree "a ...


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What you are describing seems to be a form of mirror touch synesthesia Mirror-touch synesthesia is a condition which causes individuals to experience the same sensation (such as touch) that another person feels. For example, if someone with this condition were to observe someone touching their cheek, they would feel the same sensation on their own cheek. ...


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I'll offer my personal experience here. My mother tongue is Norwegian, second language English, third language Tamil. Having left Norway years ago, I think mostly in English and sometimes in Tamil.


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Since this (excellent) question has been around for a while without any answer, I thought I'd give my two cents, like the help centre suggests. Other people may be able to expand on this and find appropriate sources, research, etc. I think we do this as a gesture of respect to the other person. We may fear that if we don't acknowledge them at all, it will ...


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The phenomenon you are referring to is called synesthesia, which can be defined as (Sinke et al., 2012): Synesthesia (Greek: syn = together; aesthesis = perception) is [...] a crossing of sensory perceptions, where stimulation within one sensory modality/stream leads to an internally generated perceptual experience of another sensory modality/stream. ...


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Seems that you are asking: I am really interested just in the way the brain creates new electrical potentials, "just on his own." and whether [sic] the brain would 'stop working', implying that there no longer is any neural activity due to the lack of external impulses. If you were to theoretically disconnect the brain from all sensory input, ...


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Physics Perhaps you are asking, "Where would the energy, or the electrical potential, come from?" Short answer: Sugar. Or, at the cellular level, ATP. Point is -- nerve impulses from the senses are [probably] not the brain's main source of energy. Internal Stimulation The five senses provide external stimulation to the brain. But that stimulation takes ...


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Short answer The primary auditory cortex is mainly involved in relatively simple processing of sound. The language areas involved in producing and understanding speech are associative auditory cortices and are considered to be areas higher up in the hierarchy. They are connected to the primary auditory cortex, but are situated at anatomically different ...


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I think there is a mathematical model for this. Have a look at Bayes' Theorem. It is also very interesting from a philosophical and psychological point of view. Here is a link from Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy: http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/bayes-theorem/


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First, we need to distinguish between those punishments brought about by nature and those brought about by society and law. Many actions in nature have an implicit consequence, such as harm, that may come back on the performer. Regardless of whether a particular person or group agrees that the consequence is "right" or "just", jumping off a high cliff and ...


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Before we can even begin to discuss how to measure a person's relative good and bad degrees, we must define good and bad. These terms are far too vague on the surface. Even if we agreed on more specific terms such as moral and immoral, there would still be a fair amount of disagreement on their meanings. For example, moral could be grounded in religion; ...


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There is no specific term for this entire phenomenon because there is more than one psychological theory playing a role in your overindulgence or "binge". Fatigue from repetitiveness, durability bias, and habituation all play a huge role in determining how long you can listen to a certain song before its gets repetitive and boring. On the other hand, ...


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Taking Up John Berryman's challenge in the Comment to the Question: Most people do not develop mentally past the Concrete Operations stage or early Formal Operations (Piaget). People with this (very common and normal) level of mental development do not reason well in abstract terms and cannot do advanced symbolic manipulations. They are prone to the many ...



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