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Myelin is a greatly extended and modified plasma membrane wrapped around the nerve axon in a spiral fashion (Morell & Quarles, 1999). It typically forms on long axons to increase conduction speed and efficiency. Learning predominantly takes place in cortical areas and it is believed that it mainly depends on synaptic changes, such as long-term ...


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So there's a lot of things to talk about here. First off, there are many strategies one can use to regulate stress. James Gross, for example, has put forward an incredibly influential process model of the strategies we might use. His work and others have pointed to: Distraction Reappraisal (reinterpreting the situation) Expressive suppression Thought ...


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I love this kind of research because it shows how there's an affective undercurrent to essentially every part of our lives. This is formalized in microvalence theory (Lebrecht et al., 2012), which posits that all objects, even ordinary ones, are imbued with valence (e.g., explaining why you prefer one chair over another). As far as positive geometric ...


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Like most of language, we have an innate ability to learn by exposure, with the rules remaining subconscious until someone forces us to explain them. Syllables are based on phonemes, so we need to know the rules of spelling if we don't already know the word by sound. Each syllable consists of an onset and a rime. The onset is a cluster of consonants (or it ...


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The answer to your question is yes, our memories are very malleable. Look into the research of Elizabeth Loftus. She is kind of the pioneer on this topic and has done a ton of research into false memories. Here is a TED talk by her that you might find interesting and here is a review article


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Absolutely! First and foremost most people commit suicide on their own authority. I discovered that suicide can seem convincingly rational and sound. Suicides are with ease driven by the thoughts and feelings that it is the best that can happen to ones loved ones and society if you die, solves all their problems, good riddance. So yes, it is fully possible ...


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My answer is going to be super skewed, I think, toward my interests. Nonetheless, I'd consider these papers "revolutionary," and I think their legacy will be long-lasting and their impact expansive (across all domains of psychology). Are emotions natural kinds? (Barrett, 2006). This paper upends many decades of thinking about what emotions are and has ...


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Chomsky's review of Skinner's book Verbal Behavior. This review helped kick off both modern linguistics and the cognitive revolution. Marr and Poggio (1976). Here is where Marr's famous levels of analysis of information processing systems are detailed. These levels provide a framework for organizing all of cognitive science research, in my and many others' ...


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Ok, I will start. I don't necessarily know if these are definitely the best three books I have read, but they are three of the best. If I think of better ones then I will add them. Thinking, Fast and Slow Predictably Irrational Influence: Science and practice My interest in cognitive science is about i) understanding my own irrationality and ii) ...


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Besides any brain markers that might say "yes", there is a huge amount of influence on upbringing. How parents behave and the way they look at "chance/risk" in life can affect how a child might be raised. Addictive personalities breed addictive traights in others such as overeating.


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From personal experience, we pick partners of many types for many reasons... But we work best with someone who is similar to our parents. We were "trained" to get along in a similar fashion and when our partner matches the same upbringing, it clicks better. We also pick partners from completely different upbringings and sometimes they work and sometimes they ...


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NLP (Neurolinguistic Programming) is a pseudoscience at worst, and not a science, but "an approach to communication, personal development, and psychotherapy" at best. There is little scientific research, and no reliable scientific findings, supporting the effectiveness of NLP, and the evidence is probably best interpreted as speaking against the ...


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It appears that there is little scientific backing for Jung's theories. As these theories were first suggested at the start of the 20th century they have had a considerable amount of time to receive scientific support. If they were accepted by scientists it therefore seems like they would have been widely used and cited by scholars in the interim period. ...


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It could be to some extent, for example, because gambling behaviour is mediated by traits like impulsiveness {1,2} which are heritable {3}. References {1} Steel, Z. and A. Blaszczynski (1998). "Impulsivity, personality disorders and pathological gambling severity." Addiction 93(6): 895-905. {2} Michalczuk, R., et al. (2011). "Impulsivity and cognitive ...


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Good question. Here is what I found. People may be attracted to the physical features that our opposite sex parent posses {1,2} However, the jury is out as to whether people are more likely to be attracted to people who share the mental traits of parents {3,4}. As an example of this {3} write "Much of the current research on parental identification and ...


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Gender is not, despite what others might say, a social construct, and neither is sexuality, just google David Rimmer to see what happens when researchers have messed with these. While we don't understand what causes homo-sexuality fully, typically speaking sexuality seems to be influenced by hormone exposure in the womb, when a human is a foetus. Although ...


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I think you've got a reasonable handle on why learning vocabulary in a single, fixed order is probably not a great idea. You may also be interested in what is called context-dependent memory, where you recall things best in a context similar to that which you learned those things in (shitty sentence, but you know what I mean).


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It should be pointed out that subvocalisation while reading is not necessarily of the same cause or purpose as subvocalisation while doing other activities. Many people are able (or accustomed) to comprehending written language only by converting it to spoken language mentally. This allows the interpretation process to share the same brain regions, as ...


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Check out [http://journals.plos.org/plosbiology/article?id=10.1371/journal.pbio.1002328] The Contribution of Network Organization and Integration to the Development of Cognitive Control by Scott Marek,Kai Hwang,William Foran,Michael N. Hallquist,Beatriz Luna Just Published on PLOS Biology: December 29, 2015 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.1002328 Cognitive ...


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@Steven Jeuris, it usually depends on who you ask what the name for a bias is. It is more important to name the factors involved in the bias, as the OP already did.



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