New answers tagged

1

Taking Up John Berryman's challenge in the Comment to the Question: Most people do not develop mentally past the Concrete Operations stage or early Formal Operations (Piaget). People with this (very common and normal) level of mental development do not reason well in abstract terms and cannot do advanced symbolic manipulations. They are prone to the many ...


2

The statement 50% of happiness is determined by genetics is presumably talking about heritability estimates. It is probably talking about the percentage of variance explained by genetics. These estimates are commonly estimated using twin studies. For example, you administer a survey to people that ask a bunch of questions about how happy they feel. There ...


-1

I think the idea is that genetics regulate neurochemistry and therefore daily mood. For example--it's likely that some people naturally experience more pleasure due to the calibration of their dopamine and serotonin systems. Habits of mind may also play a role, but almost certainly a smaller one than genetics do.


3

As the author of the blog post you refer to, I can state that at the time of writing (early 2011) there were not too many studies reporting on this specific topic, which is why I reported on the single study I found at the time (Binkley et al. 2009). However, I advise you to read a follow-up study by a different group of researchers (Sharif and Maletic ...


-1

I can think of two ways this can work (though not sure of 50% or more or less): (1) The "environment" to support a happy mind would, among other things, constitute a healthy body. And a body being healthy does depend, among other things, on genetics. (2) The predisposition of an individual to feel happy, given a suitable stimulus might depend on genetics; ...


1

As opposed to the contrast effect which relates to stimuli that are presented simultaneously or in immediate succession, the similar distinction bias constitutes a possible/partial explanation for the phenomenon that you conjecture: stimuli are experienced as more distinct when presented simultaneously than when they are presented separately. Another bias ...


0

Maybe look at the question about forced decisions, and my answer about evidence accumulation: Caller's dilemma . I guess, but do not know, that confidence is an estimate of how quickly you accumulated evidence for one of the decisions, and how much evidence there is for the other. The process is subconscious though, so how one would make the result ...


3

There are two ways to interpret/answer this question. First, is there a recognized disorder that is characterized by mania in the absence of depression? Second, are there people who experience mania in the absence of depression? The answer to the first interpretation is no. There is currently no "major manic disorder" or "unipolar mania." Given the DSM-5 ...


0

It is mostly in cases where there are but, 2 major choices which are preferred by the masses. However there are cases where the choice may be between 3 brands, say Nike, addidas and rebock. Now that's only because you have 3 major brands instead of 2. It may also be due to cultures which are more brand conscious, like in the USA. In India where brands have ...


2

After some significant searching myself I don't believe that what you've stated was one of the many criticisms of "The Bell Curve". It wouldn't be impossible for the review you read to go something like, "Murray's, "The Bell Curve" is akin to other racially biased research like as XYZ's "IQ Research", in which XYZ claimed that African students had, on ...


2

Quiet simply: loss aversion People are adverse to loss, the majority of people who are wealthy pay into a system they get little direct benefit from, in comparison to poorer people who tend to get back what they put in or more depending on circumstance. However the rich, and everyone else, benefit from being in wealthy westernised societies with higher ...


2

With wealth comes required security, at least if you value your existence and temporary stay on this earth. Also, like the first comment stated, a lot of wealth is hidden, usually (my personal opinion at least) for means of not paying taxes or something along those lines.


0

I think what you describe can be explained by echoic memory and working memory. Echoic memory is one of the sensory memory registers; a component of sensory memory (SM) that is specific to retaining auditory information. The sensory memory for sounds that people have just perceived is the form of echoic memory. ... This particular sensory store is ...


0

Probably, everyone has experienced such situation, although only a few people pay attention to this. It is a usual human behaviour. People do ask about your question to get some time for thinking what to answer. Furthermore, this behaviour is very common among journalists, because this may be a way to avoid answering the question. In addition, there is ...


4

Social Order and Hierarchy. As Humans our brains are designed to see where we fit in the social order. If someones success is perceived as a threat, it can lead to anxiety and fear from the person whom is resentful and jealous. While in the modern world there is no need for this fear, our ancestors had to compete within their tribe(s) for ...


1

I am not an expert. Words are vague. People can call something investment even if no money is invested. It's much more effective to read people's motives than to read their words. Humans are self seeking rational assholes. Reasoning are often done for moral reasoning. The thing is none of us are too moral. We do the moral acts for indirect benefit of ...


0

People are different. Our thoughts and behaviour emerge from a neural network that is shaped by countless events and no two people experience the world exactly in the same way. Even identical twins present conflicting attitudes and beliefs. Therefore, social interaction will always involve some level of conflict. Cultures form due to differences between ...


3

What you describe is known as Selective Exposure to Information. Selective exposure is a theory within the practice of psychology, often used in media and communication research, that historically refers to individuals’ tendency to favor information which reinforces their pre-existing views while avoiding contradictory information. Below find ...


3

A good introductory book is "Networks of the Brain" by Olaf Sporns. It will give you a general overview of the ideas and theories in the field. For more details consult the bibliography or read some of the journal articles by Dr. Sporns. https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/networks-brain http://www.indiana.edu/~cortex/index.html


2

If you have single-trial data, the drift-diffusion model/DDM and related models, originating with Roger Ratcliff (1976/1978), can simultaneously fit the whole response distribution, both RTs and accuracies. It captures phenomena such that in some experiments, errors are systematically faster or slower than correct responses. Fitting and interpreting the DDM ...



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