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Social Order and Hierarchy. As Humans our brains are designed to see where we fit in the social order. If someones success is perceived as a threat, it can lead to anxiety and fear from the person whom is resentful and jealous. While in the modern world there is no need for this fear, our ancestors had to compete within their tribe(s) for ...


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As the author of the blog post you refer to, I can state that at the time of writing (early 2011) there were not too many studies reporting on this specific topic, which is why I reported on the single study I found at the time (Binkley et al. 2009). However, I advise you to read a follow-up study by a different group of researchers (Sharif and Maletic ...


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There are two ways to interpret/answer this question. First, is there a recognized disorder that is characterized by mania in the absence of depression? Second, are there people who experience mania in the absence of depression? The answer to the first interpretation is no. There is currently no "major manic disorder" or "unipolar mania." Given the DSM-5 ...


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Taking Up John Berryman's challenge in the Comment to the Question: Most people do not develop mentally past the Concrete Operations stage or early Formal Operations (Piaget). People with this (very common and normal) level of mental development do not reason well in abstract terms and cannot do advanced symbolic manipulations. They are prone to the many ...


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The statement 50% of happiness is determined by genetics is presumably talking about heritability estimates. It is probably talking about the percentage of variance explained by genetics. These estimates are commonly estimated using twin studies. For example, you administer a survey to people that ask a bunch of questions about how happy they feel. There ...


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After some significant searching myself I don't believe that what you've stated was one of the many criticisms of "The Bell Curve". It wouldn't be impossible for the review you read to go something like, "Murray's, "The Bell Curve" is akin to other racially biased research like as XYZ's "IQ Research", in which XYZ claimed that African students had, on ...


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Quiet simply: loss aversion People are adverse to loss, the majority of people who are wealthy pay into a system they get little direct benefit from, in comparison to poorer people who tend to get back what they put in or more depending on circumstance. However the rich, and everyone else, benefit from being in wealthy westernised societies with higher ...


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With wealth comes required security, at least if you value your existence and temporary stay on this earth. Also, like the first comment stated, a lot of wealth is hidden, usually (my personal opinion at least) for means of not paying taxes or something along those lines.


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As opposed to the contrast effect which relates to stimuli that are presented simultaneously or in immediate succession, the similar distinction bias constitutes a possible/partial explanation for the phenomenon that you conjecture: stimuli are experienced as more distinct when presented simultaneously than when they are presented separately. Another bias ...


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I am not an expert. Words are vague. People can call something investment even if no money is invested. It's much more effective to read people's motives than to read their words. Humans are self seeking rational assholes. Reasoning are often done for moral reasoning. The thing is none of us are too moral. We do the moral acts for indirect benefit of ...



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