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There a are globally two perspectives the discrete perspective uses a categorization system. There are many different systems, with more or less core emotions and sub-emotions. As the one shown in your post. the dimensional perspective considers one, mainly two, sometimes more, scales to identify an emotional value. Valence (happy/sad) and arousal ...


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There is a lot of research on rational / conscious thought vs. heuristic / unconscious decision-making, and this research reveals many scenarios where subjects make better decisions when they "trust their gut" rather than "think things through". Check the following resources for examples: ...


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Addressing your first question (like @Josh, I would advice moving the other point to a new question), Morsanya & Handley (2008) (I can't find an open-access copy, sorry) have recently argued that heuristics have to be learned and acquired over time. They presented a group of children aged 5 - 11 with several multiple-choice reasoning tasks, consisting of ...


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I've read that a tendency to "jump to conclusions" has an impact on certain psychological afflictions, such as having delusions. As you may know, the definition of a delusion is as follows (this is just from Google dictionary): an idiosyncratic belief or impression that is firmly maintained despite being contradicted by what is generally accepted as ...


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The competence you have and the competence you need has a big gap to understand the code. You said that He thinks (opinion) that I've lacked of effort, but actually I've studied Javascript at the university (fact). My assumption (might be wrong) is that you have taken one or two courses of JavaScript there. If you have studied JavaScript at the ...


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This is an interesting question, so I'll take a stab at it. Direct evidence for the claim is hard to come by. Generally, religious affiliations, conversions, and loss of faith are self-identified in surveys. The reliance on self-identification makes it difficult to test the claim that people move to some other non-evidence-based reasoning, as they may not ...


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In short, I'm interested in cognitive, neuroscientific, biological and/or computational perspectives on what we vaguely refer to as meaning seeking. That's not very short. :-P it seems to me that a meaningful existence requires the absence of cognitive dissonances, but I wonder what science would have to say about this, and if there is any ...


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It doesn't lose its edge; it loses the strength of related associations. Cognition and skills is very much about memory, and it's all about the neural networks that make up our mental associations. It might feel like you haven't forgotten anything from the past, but in reality you have forgotten more than you know. You are not aware that you have ...


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I never knew the name for this before and used to just call it "awareness bias"; however, upon reading your question, I did a little bit of digging on Wikipedia and found out about the mere exposure effect, also known as the "familiarity principle" in social psychology. My other source was this page.


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I believe that the most commonly accepted personality model in psych is the 5-factor model. I would argue that Conscientiousness and Agreeableness are pro-social, in the sense that Agreeableness captures many of the values you've listed, while Conscientiousness captures many other pro-social values, such as willingness to work hard and desire for ...


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Cialdini's book Influence is great, I wish I hadn't lost my copy of it...I always considered that to be a social psych book, so perhaps you should study social psychology if you have an interest in this sort of thing. You could also consider glancing at his Wikipedia page for more information about where his journal articles were published...this could ...


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This particular study was by Ellen Langer, who studies "mindfullness", but that may not be what you are looking for. A related field is called "behavioural economics", and there is also a lot of overlap with "cognitive bias". Search YouTube for Dan Ariely, and Derren Brown, you'll learn lots of neat tips and tricks just like this one, backed by ...


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The question is asked – and Arnon's answer is given – based on the assumption that biases play a role only in "momentous" descisions, that is decisions that are relatively rare and can profit from rational consideration. But biases play a constant role in navigating your everyday life. For example, you don't do the Pepsi Challenge every time you buy food. ...


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It's unfortunate that the patient came to seek therapy so late, but fortunate that he came to seek therapy at all. First, I agree with user30295 in general, and just want to explain why: In the question, you say: "He only developed it a couple of months ago because of his anxiety;" ie, anxiety led to his condition - but what anxiety? In a later comment, ...



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