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Double dissociation does not prove the independence of certain cognitive functions and their neural substrates. What it does is provide stronger evidence for which the best explanation is the independence of certain neurocognitive systems. The brain is on many aspects not a marvel of engineering with many areas being responsible for a spectrum of functions ...


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Hypothalamus (mediating the four F's) septal area and amygdala (hedonic states); orbito-frontal cortex, mesolimbic dopaminergic pathway (incentive orientation), for some contributory possibilities.


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Improving your self-image (having more posessions, looking better, and all the other components of selfishness) probably engages various subcortical emotional circuits involving the amygdala, hypothalamus, and so on. This is where basic drives are also implemented. This is by far not a disorder, nor necessarily a subject for neurology! Selfishness, in ...


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Generally speaking, Kato's answer is good. I'd like to add that there is a fascinating way in which the brain understands other brains - also called mindreading or theory of mind (the basis for empathy). This process is heavily reliant on the sensory modalities. When you put yourself in someone else's shoes, your brain attempts to imagine their experiences ...


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Short answer: Mind and brain are the same system, and reading the mind is just a matter of a) knowing which brain states represent the (more abstract) 'mind' information you are trying to read, and b) being able to monitor these states with appropirate technology. Long answer: what is to some extent right when he/she says that "mind" is not a ...


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I think that you focus this question in the wrong way. There is no place in the brain where the "instructions" are stored. The brain don't need "know" how it works to work. The way in that the brain works is an emergence from the structure and the biological dynamics. All of this is based in all the layers of biological computation ...


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I'm not sure how constructive it is to think of it in terms of "components", because there are so many that contribute to selfishness: for example, you only feel your body's pain. Food and sex only feel good to you when you're the one experiencing them. Instead, it might be more constructive to look for components of selflessness and altruism, them being ...


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Modern neuroscience has left behind the notion of mind-brain separation. Neuroscientists typically accept that everything from our breathing to our emotions and the complex sense of "self" that we have is a product of our brains. We have yet to discover exactly how/when/why the "mind" emerged from the brain, but we do know that most of our mental processing ...


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As @Steven Jeuris has said, the phenomena is best known as semantic satiation. It's not as popular a topic of study as it used to be (most references I can find for it come from the 1960s), but, to the best of my memory, the actual cause of the phenomena is down to how meaning is represented in the brain. I'll explain this by loosely paraphrasing an account ...


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If you use a slightly different (and to my own experience more common) phrasing of this phenomenon to look for information you find immediate relevant results on Google. Rather than referring to words fading from consciousness I've usually heard it being stated as repeating a word often makes it lose its meaning. The first hit is a Wikipedia article on ...



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