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It actually has nothing to do with having an experimental and control group. A double dissociation refers to documenting two distinct patterns of impairment in two different groups or individuals, proving that two functions are neurologically distinct. For example, someone with hippocampal damage will have trouble forming declarative memories (memories you ...


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If you are interested in a subfacet of extraversion, i.e. agentic extraversion, a trait covering positive incentive motivation, positive emotionality, and social dominance (among others), I recommend Depue & Collins' paper Neurobiology of the structure of personality: Dopamine, facilitation of incentive motivation, and extraversion, Behavioral and Brain ...


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Introverts have higher cortical arousal than extroverts: http://io9.com/the-science-behind-extroversion-and-introversion-1282059791 Several decades ago, German psychologist Hans Eysenck came up with a more biologically based model for E/I. According to Eysenck's theory, the behaviors of introverts and extroverts are due to differences in cortical ...


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I'd expect that if you put a human brain into some other animal, and it was able to learn how to operate that body well enough to live, then it would eventually start to try to speak. It would have to re-learn how to produce the sounds like an infant would. However, it probably would never be able to speak as well as a human due to physical limitations of ...


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I'd like to add a reference about the scientific effects of binaural beats in the brain: Auditory Beats in the Brain; a transcript of the orginal paper by Gerald Oster, Scientific American, October 1973 (scanned original attached): Slow modulations called binaural beats are perceived when tones of different frequency are presented separately to each ear. ...


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Can dumb human beings speak? No. But can they communicate using human language? Of course! Maybe this question can be answered if we stop thinking about "talking" as speaking our own native tongue. If a human level intelligence existed in a non-human body, it would certainly develop a language to communicate with other members of its species. The fact ...


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Short answer Damage to the inner ear can result in an asymmetric distortion in pitch perception between the two ears. This phenomenon can result in the same tone being perceived as a different pitch by the two ears. Background Damage to the inner ear (the cochlea) can lead to hearing loss. Hearing loss can sometimes lead to changes in perceived pitch. For ...


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Vigorous intensity (80% heart rate reserve) with long duration (40 min) offers the greatest probability of a significant BDNF elevation according to The Effects of Aerobic Exercise Intensity and Duration on Levels of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Healthy Men study published in 2013. The study does not give an answer to the optimal frequency of ...


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This is a complicated question if you stop for a moment to think about it. Evolution is a complicated process. Brains and other part of the bodies actually do not evolve distinctly from each other. We can say they co-evolved if you will... So how did humans get language? How did humans get speech? Did they acquire it together if not which first. There are ...


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Part of what makes speech possible is a complex set of interactions between a number of different muscles that control aspects of producing speech sounds like airflow and mouth shape. Humans are unique in the complexity of the sounds that we can produce. Even if we granted the science-fiction that would be necessary to put a human brain into a chimpanzee and ...


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If I am reading this correctly you are essentially asking where is the consciousness located in the brain. The system would be the RAS (Reticular Activating System) and you can read up it on the good ol' wakapedia. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reticular_activating_system#Attention I'd also like to note that it is not specific to humans.



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