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has made it possible to have perfect input/output to the brain from a computer Perfect? Definitely not: the complexities of optogenetics of a single mm square of cortex, of a mouse lets say, are extremely complex. As Chuck mentions, many neurons/synapses may be activated by a single LASER and current technologies allow only a few different LASER ...


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I don't buy it the claim made in the quote. The speed of sound is roughly 1 foot per millsecond so even if you take a large 3 foot step you are changing the audio visual onset asynchrony by only 3 ms. What this means is that if you present a flash and a click with various onset asynchrony to subjects you would expect there to be a narrow range of lags (less ...


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The answer is definitely yes, if you take a slightly different example MacDonald & McGurk (1978). The McGurk effect in linguistics is quite well-known: given video of a mouth pronouncing a bilabial consonant, and synced audio of a nonlabial consonant, the viewer will generally report hearing a consonant whose place of articulation is roughly the average ...


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Ha, I was going to mention the Kok Neuron paper :) The Cerebral Cortex one does not use decoding however. This one may also be of interest to you: Vetter, P., Smith, F. W., & Muckli, L. (2014). Decoding Sound and Imagery Content in Early Visual Cortex. Current Biology, 24(11), 1256-1262. Lars Muckli is in general someone who might have more of the ...


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A neurodegenerative disorder that appears in boxers after repeated hits on the head is called Dementia pugilistica. I have heard some people call it punch-drunk disease. It manifests as Dementia but often involves paranoia. There is an article on wikipedia about it.


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Double dissociation does not prove the independence of certain cognitive functions and their neural substrates. What it does is provide stronger evidence for which the best explanation is the independence of certain neurocognitive systems. The brain is on many aspects not a marvel of engineering with many areas being responsible for a spectrum of functions ...


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Hypothalamus (mediating the four F's) septal area and amygdala (hedonic states); orbito-frontal cortex, mesolimbic dopaminergic pathway (incentive orientation), for some contributory possibilities.


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Improving your self-image (having more posessions, looking better, and all the other components of selfishness) probably engages various subcortical emotional circuits involving the amygdala, hypothalamus, and so on. This is where basic drives are also implemented. This is by far not a disorder, nor necessarily a subject for neurology! Selfishness, in ...


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Generally speaking, Kato's answer is good. I'd like to add that there is a fascinating way in which the brain understands other brains - also called mindreading or theory of mind (the basis for empathy). This process is heavily reliant on the sensory modalities. When you put yourself in someone else's shoes, your brain attempts to imagine their experiences ...


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Short answer: Mind and brain are the same system, and reading the mind is just a matter of a) knowing which brain states represent the (more abstract) 'mind' information you are trying to read, and b) being able to monitor these states with appropirate technology. Long answer: what is to some extent right when he/she says that "mind" is not a ...


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I think that you focus this question in the wrong way. There is no place in the brain where the "instructions" are stored. The brain don't need "know" how it works to work. The way in that the brain works is an emergence from the structure and the biological dynamics. All of this is based in all the layers of biological computation ...



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