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Short answer: Altmann's model is hierarchical and allows for "higher-level" goals and "lower-level" goals, but a goal is ultimately a goal―higher level goals are just sets of lower level goals, at least as far as I understand it. Given its ability to predict performance on solid laboratory tasks like the Tower of Hanoi, there is no reason to think that ...


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Rigotti et al. have a model of the wisconsin card sorting task using a neural network and compare it with data from prefrontal cortex http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2967380/


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I do not know for sure, but I believe that the vectors would be created in a domain-specific manner. Vectors in the visual system would be created in a way that is particular to the needs of visual processing, etc. The reason why the vectors are represented as random in the semantic pointer architecture, is because from the point of view of the ...


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Currently, the most comprehensive cognitive model of executive functions would have to be the model proposed by Miyake et al. (2000). (It is probably best not to confuse being the most comprehensive cognitive model with being a strong explanation, because the executive functions remain one of the most poorly understood areas of cognition, but it's a very ...


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Interesting question. "Ontology" is often used in confusing and polyvalent ways, so let's start by clearing up the terminology very quickly for those who aren't intimate with the various different meanings. What does "ontology" mean? Broadly, ontology the field is the philosophical study of being. An ontology is a method for establishing what beings or ...


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This sounds a little bit like a mild form of Depersonalization. From Wikipedia: The core symptom of depersonalization disorder is the subjective experience of "unreality in one's sense of self", and as such there are no clinical signs. People who are diagnosed with depersonalization also experience an almost uncontrollable urge to question and think ...


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While both prism adaptation and negative transfer are pointers to the right direction, I'd see this as a question concerning brain plasticity (you may want to tag the question with that, I don't have the required points to create a new tag). The guy could indeed learn to ride the reverse bike, but he would have to work hard on it, and would have a hard ...


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Pending Josh's better prism-adaptation-based answer, I believe the general cognitive term for this is negative transfer. Most of the time, when people learn something new or improve their skills in one domain, we observe related improvement in related skills and domains. Sometimes, however, it's the other way around―typically motor activities. A relevant ...



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