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10

The Computational Theory of Mind is not that the mind does some form of computation in the wide sense of computation. Rather, look at the examples for the CToM given in the Wikipedia article; people like Fodor, Pinker, Marr. Their view is very much the opposite to the Connectionist position of West Coast scientists like Rumelhart, Elman and McClelland. Both ...


6

the question which of these two descriptions is correct? is perhaps natural in the context of, say, someone studying for an examination. epistemologists might suggest that a better formulation would be is either of these correct? however, as stated here there are clear reasons for preferring the first formulation to the second. I shall first explain why, ...


5

Thoughts on the paper The paper appears to provide a high level overview of the role of mathematics in cognitive science. I'm not a sufficient expert in the overall field of cognitive science where I'd feel comfortable to truly judge the accuracy of the overall synthesis that Andler (2012) provides. That said, much of the paper is about providing examples ...


4

The Benjamin Franklin Effect is generally cited as being an example of cognitive dissonance, which is when your brain struggles to reconcile your beliefs with your actions. So let’s say your beliefs about your job are that you deserve to be paid a higher rate, you deserve to be treated more respectfully by your employer and your skills are being wasted in ...


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Partial answer: Douglas Hofstadter has written quite a lot about this from a more philosophical approach. His style isn't for everyone, I think it's introduced well in this chapter ('Ant Fugue'). For more applied work from the same, you might look at Mitchell and Hofstadter's CopyCat model of analogies (described briefly here, as well as on wikipedia). ...


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I think this recent paper fits your requirements. It considers biological plausibility by showing that the number of neurons required in the proposed method is within a reasonable size for the human brain, and dismisses a series of unreasonable models. Specifically, they create a neural network that contains 2.5 million neurons to contain a network of ...


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Thanks for sharing the article. I read the paper and what I take from it is a rather pessimistic view. He suggests that there is a crucial need for overarching proper mathematical modeling, but he makes it sound this is also a huge obsticle and we must wait (longer than a young persons academic career) to see the fruits of it. I'm coming from a theoretical ...


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A heuristic consists of preferences that help you decide in a situation where you do not have enough information or do not care enough to make an informed decision. For example, when you want to buy yoghurt, but are no nutritionist, you might decide on which yoghurt you buy by the familiarity of the brand name (you prefer the familiar, this is called the ...


3

There's a huge amount of perspectives you could take in answering a question like this, but I would like to approach it from the perspective of dual process theories (see the Evans, 2008 Annual Review paper for an outline). I'm not going to reference this answer much beyond that, because almost all the information is adapted from this review, with some ...


3

There are several approaches to theoretical neuroscience. I am currently taking the physics/mathematics approach: modelling the currents in neurons and coupling several neurons together through differential equations. In Computer Science, the tendency is more towards machine learning: Bayesian statistics, artificial neural networks, signal processing, ...


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To extend on @BenCole comment, an interesting summary of different models of time perceptions can be found in this paper. Now these models are in a sense more descriptive than the fundamental biological hypothesis mentioned by caseyr547, so might not be ready to call these "explanations", depending on what you mean by the term. The models meant to give a ...


2

The term I was looking for is "concurrent activities". Some research in the domain of hierarchical learning has been done in this domain by Rohanimanesh and Mahadevan. According to this literature review on hierarchical learning, basically what they did was determine how multiple tasks can be managed without interfering with one another and how they should ...


2

Your question is a bit vague, but it sounds like you might be looking for Hick's Law. Hick's law states the relationship between the number of possible responses that an organism can provide for a given task and the minimum time necessary to engage a response. You may have also been thinking of one of the computational models for two-alternative ...


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Both the Amsterdam University (UvA) and Radboud University use a public online system for applying for participation in experiments. I forget which system UvA uses, but Radboud uses the sona system (just google it, you can creat an account). There you can see ongoing studies and apply for experiments. Both these cities are big research hubs for neuroimaging. ...


2

Neuroanatomically speaking I think Kahneman may be talking about the "hot" and "cold" executive function pathways (this wikipedia article is fairly informative on the subject). Hot executive function is thought to involve affect or reward processing, and the ventromedial prefrontal cortex is generally thought to be crucial for this. Cold executive function ...


1

Here is the illustrate of both equation To make them visible at same time, I changed 100 to 1 and set memory strength as 1. They look alike.


1

Regarding the first question: It is well documented that emotions guide/modulate "higher" cognitive processes. A more specific theory of how this could work is, for instance, Antonio Damasio's somatic marker hypothesis. Additionally, I'm not so sure emotion and "cold" cognition can really be categorically seperated, seeing as they share a lot of the same ...


1

Algorithms can be seen as rules defined on various states of the system. Thus, there must be a mapping of the physical states to the abstract states, as well as a mapping of the physical rules/transitions to the abstract rules. David Chalmers is one of the most popular philosophers who discusses the notion of when a physical system implements an abstract ...


1

I would disagree with @Krysta: the distinction between system 1 and system 2 processes goes far beyond that of cognition with/without emotion: it's a complex debates that's been going on since the 70s (in it's current form, it's echoed in a wider debate going back centuries). For the sake of brevity, let me resort to bullet points. For psychologists, Evans ...


1

The Neurological Engineering Framework does not explicitly state a mechanism for memory. There is no "hard-drive" in the brain for easy retrieval and access. Rather, memory is captured in the connection weights between neural populations and the dynamics of the network. In the Hierarchical Reinforcement Learning example, linked to in the previous question, ...


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Hi there had the same problem but i found the original report: Wickens, C. D., Helleberg, J., Goh, J., Xu, X., & Horrey, W. J. (2001). Pilot Task Management: Testing an Attentional Expected Value Model of Visual Scanning (Technical Report No. ARL-01-14/NASA-01-7). NASA Ames Research Center. Retrieved from ...


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Schema and Heuristic are two different things- not really related to one another, so I'm not sure asking for the difference between the two makes sense. That said- A Schema is a cognitive framework for storing information and relating it together. Schemas form the basis for knowledge in the head. A Heuristic is a mechanism for solving problems. Therefore, ...



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