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8

The Computational Theory of Mind is not that the mind does some form of computation in the wide sense of computation. Rather, look at the examples for the CToM given in the Wikipedia article; people like Fodor, Pinker, Marr. Their view is very much the opposite to the Connectionist position of West Coast scientists like Rumelhart, Elman and McClelland. Both ...


7

In general, there are two types of 'complexity' that are studied. Usually, when people talk about 'complexity', especially on the internet, they mean Santa Fe Institute style complexity. This is a vague and poorly defined concept that has struggled for a number of years without making significant progress. It uses pretty words, but has yet to deliver on any ...


6

the question which of these two descriptions is correct? is perhaps natural in the context of, say, someone studying for an examination. epistemologists might suggest that a better formulation would be is either of these correct? however, as stated here there are clear reasons for preferring the first formulation to the second. I shall first explain why, ...


6

This is Freud's own original diagram: Please note that only the uppermost part of the self, the part labelled "pcpt-cs" (i.e. perception-consciousness, German Wachbewusstsein) constitutes our conscious thought. All three parts of the psychic apparatus are not conscious. Some parts of the Ego and Super-Ego are preconscious and can potentially become ...


5

If you had asked about cognitive distortions, I probably could've answered straight away about one of those! I think it might be an illusion of transparency. Your example somewhat aligns to the definition provided by Gilovich, Medvec & Savitsky (1998): "... we refer to this tendency to overestimate the extent to which others can read one's internal ...


5

Thoughts on the paper The paper appears to provide a high level overview of the role of mathematics in cognitive science. I'm not a sufficient expert in the overall field of cognitive science where I'd feel comfortable to truly judge the accuracy of the overall synthesis that Andler (2012) provides. That said, much of the paper is about providing examples ...


4

It's actually much simpler - on the surface - than what that quoted item implies! Probability learning is literally "learning" what the "probability" is of certain things, the study of how people and other animals learn about real world probabilities outside a statistics classroom, and in cognitive science (like in the PDF you linked) the concern is about ...


4

This is of course a big question and I don't believe that there is a definite answer to it. A very thorough investigation of this matter comes from Rogers and McClelland (2004), who have a developed a parallel distributed theory of acquisition, representation and use of human semantic knowledge. As the name implies, this effort comes from the realm of ...


4

The Benjamin Franklin Effect is generally cited as being an example of cognitive dissonance, which is when your brain struggles to reconcile your beliefs with your actions. So let’s say your beliefs about your job are that you deserve to be paid a higher rate, you deserve to be treated more respectfully by your employer and your skills are being wasted in ...


4

Thanks for sharing the article. I read the paper and what I take from it is a rather pessimistic view. He suggests that there is a crucial need for overarching proper mathematical modeling, but he makes it sound this is also a huge obsticle and we must wait (longer than a young persons academic career) to see the fruits of it. I'm coming from a theoretical ...


4

Partial answer: Douglas Hofstadter has written quite a lot about this from a more philosophical approach. His style isn't for everyone, I think it's introduced well in this chapter ('Ant Fugue'). For more applied work from the same, you might look at Mitchell and Hofstadter's CopyCat model of analogies (described briefly here, as well as on wikipedia). ...


4

I think this recent paper fits your requirements. It considers biological plausibility by showing that the number of neurons required in the proposed method is within a reasonable size for the human brain, and dismisses a series of unreasonable models. Specifically, they create a neural network that contains 2.5 million neurons to contain a network of ...


3

To extend on @BenCole comment, an interesting summary of different models of time perceptions can be found in this paper. Now these models are in a sense more descriptive than the fundamental biological hypothesis mentioned by caseyr547, so might not be ready to call these "explanations", depending on what you mean by the term. The models meant to give a ...


3

There's a huge amount of perspectives you could take in answering a question like this, but I would like to approach it from the perspective of dual process theories (see the Evans, 2008 Annual Review paper for an outline). I'm not going to reference this answer much beyond that, because almost all the information is adapted from this review, with some ...


3

There are several approaches to theoretical neuroscience. I am currently taking the physics/mathematics approach: modelling the currents in neurons and coupling several neurons together through differential equations. In Computer Science, the tendency is more towards machine learning: Bayesian statistics, artificial neural networks, signal processing, ...


3

A heuristic consists of preferences that help you decide in a situation where you do not have enough information or do not care enough to make an informed decision. For example, when you want to buy yoghurt, but are no nutritionist, you might decide on which yoghurt you buy by the familiarity of the brand name (you prefer the familiar, this is called the ...


3

It's a little unclear what you're asking. In general, psychologists try to build models that are parsimonious; this often means only introducing new parameters (particularly free parameters) into a model when they are absolutely necessary. You are right that with a sufficient number of free parameters, one can build a model that fits the data perfectly. But ...


3

Egocentrism? I can't even find the Family Circus comic where the boy is talking on the phone, playing with a yo-yo, and says, "Look what I can do, grandma!" Update: Huh, I didn't find that comic, but it's still a Family Circus comic that accompanies the topic. Grandma: "Tell me, Jeffy, what was this fun dream about last night?" Jeffy: "Don't you remember, ...


3

Mario Liotti and Don M. Tucker (Brain Asymmetry, MIT, 1996) attempt to explain that the 'corticolimbic architecture is not left/right, but dorsal/ventral". In their opinion, the reason for hemispheric asymmetries can be found in the asymmetries of the dorsal and ventral systems. They proposed that emotional behavior could be interpreted by analyzing the ...


3

A 2013 book tackles this subject : Surfaces and Essences, written by Douglas Hofstadter and Emmanuel Sander. They mostly cite anecdotal evidence (not only, Emmanuel Sander worked on this subject for years), but the theory is very convincing, and quite beautiful. The book received praise from some big names (including Steven Pinker and Elizabeth Loftus). So, ...


2

Personality disorders are diagnosed with the DSM manual save for a few which have targeted assessment tools (like the PCL-R). TA is not considered a well supported technique research wise and lots of schools don't teach it except by way of a history lesson. I'm quite certain that both Berne and the authors of the DSM would agree that it doesn't actually ...


2

You may be interested in the FARS model from Fagg and Arbib (1999) that describes the interaction of the two visual streams in the primate brain during object grasping. The article What Puts the How in Where? Tool Use and the Divided Visual Streams Hypothesis (2007) makes use of the dorsal/ventral streams to explain our ability to use complex tool. As Frey ...


2

Your question is a bit vague, but it sounds like you might be looking for Hick's Law. Hick's law states the relationship between the number of possible responses that an organism can provide for a given task and the minimum time necessary to engage a response. You may have also been thinking of one of the computational models for two-alternative ...


2

Both the Amsterdam University (UvA) and Radboud University use a public online system for applying for participation in experiments. I forget which system UvA uses, but Radboud uses the sona system (just google it, you can creat an account). There you can see ongoing studies and apply for experiments. Both these cities are big research hubs for neuroimaging. ...


1

Hi there had the same problem but i found the original report: Wickens, C. D., Helleberg, J., Goh, J., Xu, X., & Horrey, W. J. (2001). Pilot Task Management: Testing an Attentional Expected Value Model of Visual Scanning (Technical Report No. ARL-01-14/NASA-01-7). NASA Ames Research Center. Retrieved from ...


1

Schema and Heuristic are two different things- not really related to one another, so I'm not sure asking for the difference between the two makes sense. That said- A Schema is a cognitive framework for storing information and relating it together. Schemas form the basis for knowledge in the head. A Heuristic is a mechanism for solving problems. Therefore, ...



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