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Unanswered questions don't necessarily cause cognitive dissonance. Need for closure varies across individuals; some of us don't mind having some (or even many) unanswered questions much at all. One also moves forward along a path while "looping," and that path isn't necessarily infinite; in fact, it probably isn't for any mortal, practically speaking. For ...


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We are driven by this need to find answer to our questions. Many questions arise from one's mind by experiencing new events or feelings, or having to sort out a cognitive dissonance. An example of this would be the need for victims to find the guilty. When we can’t immediately gratify our desire to know, we become highly motivated to reach a concrete ...


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A great open lecture set is Human Behavioral Biology by Robert Sopolsky through Stanford. It's on YouTube. I also recommend Paul Bloom's Intro to Psych through Yale open courses.


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Yes, you can think of biological entities as algorithms, but that doesn't give you any explanatory power. Unfortunately, most people have little to no understanding of algorithms, and how little actually constraint is imposed on something when you say it is "algorithmic". In particular, there is no restrictions on algorithms that require them to be ...


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It seems to be related to a kind of "Peer pressure". This is due the change of the context. A profound discussion is regarded as confidential talk and you will notice that the voice volume is lower than a discussion with many people. But why is a profound discussion regarded as confidential? Maybe because you could touch scientific taboos. Every time you ...


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I experience empathy to the extent that it causes massive social phobia and other such problems. Other human beings end up being a constant sort of noise even when they're silent and being around them too often drains me of all my energy, but I don't actually produce my own emotions a lot of the time (or I can't recognize them as well not sure) so being left ...


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The literature on social grooming in humans mentions examples of grooming, most of which are unique to humans, include: running fingers through another’s hair, giving massages, washing the body or hair, shaving, removing lint or hair from another’s clothing, swatting away insects, and giving manicures or pedicures, and removing pus from blemishes or ...


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Short answer: Behaviorism treats the human brain/mind like a black box whose internal processes cannot be known. As such, behaviorists claim that it only makes sense to study the association between a given stimulus and the behavioral output it produces. Cognitivists, on the other hand, examine internal mental processes (attention, executive controle, ...


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There is a substantial body of literature addressing each of these questions (why do people quit therapy and what predicts positive outcomes); unfortunately there are no easy answers. In part, this is because the literature has looked at these questions from a range of angles, including client characteristics (age, race, gender, motivation, education level, ...


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No. Algorithmic behavior can be observed in organisms, but an organism cannot be reduced to just algorithms because the information processing is tightly coupled to the physical hardware, which evolves continuously and (largely) deterministically. That is, nature doesn't break behaviors into discrete algorithmic steps. Similar to how humans break up the ...


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It is important for us not to mix up the two words psychopathy and psychosis... The term “psychosis” has its roots in the ancient Greek words for an aberration or abnormality (osis) of the mind or soul (psyche). Thus, the psychotic mind is literally a mind that has stopped functioning normally. A psychotic person has lost the capacity to think and behave ...


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Sometimes they are aware. For example a manic-depressive is mostly aware of having a psychological problem during his depressive phases, but will usually perceive himself well while manic. Schizophrenics often understand that they have delusions, but many of them can only understand this while they are in a non-delusional phase. Sadists are often aware of ...


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Here's an interesting abstract from a relevant paper I found a while back: This paper proposes a new theoretical model of curiosity that incorporates the neuroscience of "wanting" and "liking", which are two systems hypothesised to underlie motivation and affective experience for a broad class of appetites. In developing the new model, the paper ...


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Your question is a bit vague, but it sounds like you might be looking for Hick's Law. Hick's law states the relationship between the number of possible responses that an organism can provide for a given task and the minimum time necessary to engage a response. You may have also been thinking of one of the computational models for two-alternative ...


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Q: What is the reason for people to implicitly trust their peers in extreme (or not) situations? Reliance is basically the dependence or trust in someone, to each lies a limited capability of being relied on due to our limited capacity as human beings. What I'm trying to imply is that your friend might have been able to consciously lead you across the ...


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First of all you must understand that "psychopathy" or "sadistic personality disorder" are names given by scholars to groups of behaviors that seem to have something in common. These categories are not god-given, but human made, and what they include or exclude changes with the progress of scientific knowledge as well as political interests. Sadistic ...


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Is association, conditioning, and symbolic learning the same thing? Conditioning (both classical and operant), memory, and others mentioned in the question are considered examples (types) of association by associationism, a school of philosophy in psychology that suggests that all mental processes may be based on similar or proximal mental states. ...


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It sounds like rational behaviour (i.e., it is not a cognitive bias). Monitoring generally creates a closer link between behaviour and social consequences (either rewards or punishments). A huge number of theories capture ideas about how the social context influences behaviour (e.g., social norms). In the work context, you could look at ideas around ...


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The underlying cognitive process that produces the "anchoring bias" in decision-making is the same one that produces the "primacy and recency effect" in learning and memory. Your attention is drawn to novel, salient and recent stimuli, and are more likely to learn about and remember more about the first example of something and the last (most recent) example ...


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This question essentially addresses the difference between ego-syntonic and -dystonic disorders. To quote Wikipedia: Egosyntonic is a psychological term referring to behaviors, values, feelings that are in harmony with or acceptable to the needs and goals of the ego, or consistent with one's ideal self-image. Egodystonic...is the opposite of ...


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From my modest point of view, I am guessing that curiosity is a trait that evolved with primates. Curiosity may have helped our ancestors find new sources of food, or better avoid predators by watching them and being more aware of their surroundings. And then human babies, if praised for their curiosity in their youth, grow up to love being curious. And ...



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