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16

Nehligh's 2010 review Nehlig (2010) wrote a systematic review article called "Is caffeine a cognitive enhancer?" (link to publisher, no PDF). On page S89 to S90 Nehlig reviews the evidence of caffeine as a cognitive enhancer within the context of a history of caffeine consumption: In caffeine non-deprived young (20–25 years) and older subjects (50–65 ...


11

Particulalry short wavelengths (such a UV light) have been shown to suppress melatonin[1], a hormone that regulates sleep. The authors also show that: All subjects had an elevated cortisol level in the 90 minutes prior to onset of light exposure compared with the corresponding clock time on the previous day So there's a kind daily memory in the ...


4

I think you may have answered your own question. You can build a GSR meter or purchase one online. You do not necessarily need to hook it up to your computer; if it has an LED you can simply record the results with pen and paper. If you want to measure heart rate, buy a stethoscope. Or if you want to be really cheap, check your pulse using two fingers; it's ...


3

It seems that there is a research literature on the topic of the relationship between body temperature and time perception. Weardon and Penon-Voak (1995) present a literature review of the topic which would be worth reading if this interests you. The following quotes their abstract: Experiments investigating timing behaviour in humans under conditions ...


3

MEGs using SQUIDs can detect magnetic flux density measured in teslas. Away from sleep studies and epileptic brain activity, this should be a useful indicator of relative brain arousal. Readings from two different people on this scale should be comparable based on the orders of magnitude for the unit measurement. As for comparative measurements of brain ...


2

You might not be looking for an answer about sleep deprivation per se—you might just be interested in normal daily fatigue immediately before normal sleep—but of course sleep deprivation results in tiredness, so the answer seems likely to be equivalent (though I'm not a sleep researcher by specialty). Here's an answer for sleep deprivation and memory (Alhola ...


2

I've long been thinking that arousal levels can be measured by an actigraph, although I have not seen scientific articles that deal with this topic. Nor did I conduct any kind of large scale test. A lot of actigraphy studies focus on sleep and distinguishing sleep from wakefulness. I hypothesize that actigraphy may say something about the level of arousal of ...



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