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Wikipedia on time perception The Wikipedia article on "time perception". In particular, the section on long-term time perception cites a couple of articles. * The articles makes the common point that a unit of time as a proportion of one's life decreases with age. A few empirical studies are also cited. Ukraintseva (2001) Ukraintseva (2001) wrote an ...


11

There is "hard evidence" regarding how timing and the subjective experience of intervals changes as a function of age. McAuley et al. (2006) ran a battery of different timing and time perception tasks on participants of ages ranging from 4 to 95 years. One finding that relates to your question was that children in the range of 4 to 7 years preferred and, ...


9

Seattle Longitudinal Study: You might want to have a read about The Seattle Longitudinal Study of Adult Intelligence. There's a summary of the study on this website. To quote the website: The Seattle Longitudinal Study of Adult Intelligence has followed a group of more than 5000 people for well over four decades. The program began in 1956 and ...


9

This is a partial answer suggesting a possible causal mechanism. One of the factors leading to birth defects and autism is mutations in the parent's genetic material. In a recently published article, Sun et al. (2012) observed that: The paternal-to-maternal mutation rate ratio is 3.3, and the rate in fathers doubles from age 20 to 58, whereas there is ...


8

Cross-race effect in facial processing As @analystic has noted, there is substantial research documenting what is sometimes called the "cross-race effect": Cross-race effect (sometimes called cross-race bias, other-race bias or own-race bias) is the tendency for people of one race to have difficulty recognizing and processing faces and facial ...


6

Deconstructing your question There is a difference between the ability to experience an emotion and tendency to experience an emotion. There is a difference between proportion of time that an individual experiences an emotion and the intensity of that emotion. Obviously, you could take many approaches to answering this question. Emotions can be viewed from ...


5

This is probably an example of the "cross-race effect", in which people of one ethnic group (you're talking ethnicity, not culture here) have trouble distinguishing between members of another ethnic group. It comes down to familiarity basically - if we are more familiar with the features of a white face (for example) then we'll be able to notice minor ...


4

I did a little search and found an article by Moen (1996) which seems relevant. Moen summarised the existing evidence as follows: Poor physical health is frequently a reason for retiring (Anderson & Burkhauser, 1985; Bound, 1991; Chirikos & Nestel, 1989; Palmore, Burchett, Filenbaum, George, & Wallman, 1985), leading to a view of a ...


4

Firstly, the matter of lifestyle is probably a significant factor. Someone who is an alcoholic their whole life and never tries or learns new things is going to have a different outcome that somebody who is still learning new things and exercising and eating healthy. That being said, lifestyles equal, there's at least two factors in age-associated ...


3

Something to keep in mind is that anything you hear on TV is that it's probably not completely accurate. Psychosis is not a condition; it's a symptom of a condition. Psychosis can be involved in many psychopathologies, (psychological disorders) with symptoms of a psychosis involved in schizophrenia, depression, PTSD, bi-polar disorder, and many other types ...


3

To extend on @BenCole comment, an interesting summary of different models of time perceptions can be found in this paper. Now these models are in a sense more descriptive than the fundamental biological hypothesis mentioned by caseyr547, so might not be ready to call these "explanations", depending on what you mean by the term. The models meant to give a ...


2

In general, the introduction section of McArdle et al (2002) provides a good literature review on the topic (see link to PDF in references). Early research by Jones and Conrad (1933) McArdle et al (2002) extract a quote from Jones and Conrad's (1933) summary of the literature based on large cross-sectional studies and also the classic Army alpha tests: ...


1

Following the comments you've received, I'll add my own subjective answer in the affirmative to your first question. I think we've already compiled enough votes and comments here that support @JoshGitlin's unscientific answer to say that there is some empirical basis for theorizing the existence of a "taste" acquisition process in music. Nonetheless, here's ...



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