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20

I found a little discussion of the issue in Russell (2000), where he summarises some of the views of the scientific literature: Recent reviews of the empirical literature bearing on the claim of special aesthetic significance for this ratio in the context of the perception of simple figures include Green (1995), Hoge (1995), and contributors to a ...


12

Indicator of genetic fitness argument There is an evolutionary psychology argument. As with most evolutionary psychology arguments, the strength of the evidence is typically a bit fuzzy. Symmetry in many aspects of the human body is functional. Such symmetry might be seen as the natural state that arises from a healthy life and a youthful body. In contrast ...


9

To add a small neuroscientific point to excellent @JeromyAnglim answer - there has been an interesting study by Rizzolatti group (guy who 'discovered' mirror neurons) published in PLoS ONE. Di Dio, et al. (2007) looked at the brain responses to Classical and Renaissance sculptures, but they manipulated the proportion of sculptures' features by violating the ...


8

It's an interesting question, I imagine the desire is multifaceted and that it may reflect multiple desires and multiple activities. In particular, I'd distinguish between (a) the desire for a viewing experience and (b) the desire to get to the top and achieve goals. Desire to Climb There are many examples of people taking joy in climbing. This can be ...


7

It's from fear sprung out of the inability to clearly identify and interpret something and from that know how to react to it. There's something skewed with what you see, something deviating from your mental model of what a face (in this example) looks like. That makes us perceive it as something unknown, and what's unknown is also perceived as unpredictable ...


6

There is a processing fluency theory that explains it quite nicely. In short, according to this theory the symmetrical objects are pleasant as they are easier to process. See Reber et al (2004) for a detailed description: We propose that aesthetic pleasure is a function of the perceiver's processing dynamics: The more fluently perceivers can process ...


6

With regard to your first question about the pschological processes of interpersonal attraction there are (at least) 4 factors that have been found in the social psychology literature. Contextual Aspects. People are more likely to develop attraction towards those they see more frequently than others. This is known as the Mere Exposure Effect (Saegert, ...


5

The first thing to note is that the study was not published as a peer-reviewed journal article. It was published as a blog post. Thus, it has not gone through a peer review process. While the reader can function as the reviewer, the article does not follow the structure of a journal article. As such, there is an inadequate description of the method in the ...


5

If you are interested in scientific research, you may want to read Lever, Frederick, and Peplau (2006). From their abstract Views about penis size were assessed in an Internet survey of 52,031 heterosexual men and women... Whereas 85% of women were satisfied with their partner’s penis size, only 55% of men were satisfied with their penis size, 45% wanted ...


4

Sexual attraction has mostly but not only a biological roots. Can this particular woman bear healthy children for me? Do I want this man? Can he be a good father? In a few seconds, someone can evaluate this simply in his/her mind (evaluate such factors as: height, weight, balance, hips, hair, smell, voice, how healthy the person looks, etc.) Also, social ...


3

That's a difficult to say I assume many kind of past memories* linked with emotions subconsciously play certainly a critical role nevertheless I found an interesting link (http://www.gizmag.com/predicting-hit-songs/20939/) which is about a formula on how to find out the next hit song. *by memories I mean more kind of episodic memories rather than semantic ...


2

Dude. This is an awesome experiment. Emotional Design is written by my favorite cognitive psychologist, Donald Norman. It's full of research on taste. In it, he says taste is highly subjective and based on culture. C is probably equally distant in both cases, at the point where it becomes unreadable. Unless at that point you'd rather look at C and say, ...


2

One relevant piece of research is the research on the “mere exposure” effect. Basically, the idea is that being exposed to something novel is enough to make you like it a little bit more. The most common interpretation is that we generally like the things we can understand/process easily and that repeated exposures makes the stimulus more familiar and thus ...


2

It could be the case that it takes time to like some thinks. We get habituated by being exposed to the same stimuli, here music. The dislike decreases after repeated presentations and the likeness may occur, if at all. At the same time, there is a continuous 'strive' between 'familiarity' and 'change'. The experience of 'change' we face by listening to some ...


1

The 'hardwired' things we value in partners include not only physical and psychological suitability for procreating, but also social status. Thus, any visible indicators that we associate with high status are also perceived as sexy even if they don't have no direct match to anything else, and mass media can affect what properties indicators are perceived ...


1

Some ancient historical precedent exists for preferring $10$, but also for $6$, so that's mixed support from Wikipedia on perfect numbers. As for honest-to-goodness modern research, here's one quick result on prevalence of round prices in marketing (Klumpp, Brorsen, & Anderson, 2005): it's higher than for non-round prices. Some other results are reviewed ...


1

There are numbers - as in groups of objects - that are easily divisible so may have the appeal of symmetry. Other numbers may align with the number system. However, there are different number systems. The ancient Egyptians counted on their fingers using the each knuckle of the four fingers sequentially, so 3 knuckles x 4 fingers allowed them to count to ...



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