Questions about the ways that our bodies processes incoming visual, auditory, gustatory, somatosensory, proprioceptive, and pain (among others) information

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Any research showing success teaching with smell?

CogSci holds that smell is the sense that has the most strong/immediate capability to trigger memories. It is discussed, in awe. We see anecdotes such as the sudden striking memory of sitting in your ...
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2answers
90 views

Why does your recorded or objective voice sound different to what you hear in your own head?

When speaking, I hear my own voice very differently from how others do and from what it really is. The sound differs in tone, pitch, volume, etc. For example, recordings of my singing or speaking in ...
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3answers
157 views

Is there some hierarchy of the human senses?

What I mean by this is to ask if each of the sensory inputs can be quantified by the amount of information the brain is receiving: For example, Brain says: currently receiving 10 packets of visual ...
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3answers
324 views

Are colors real?

We know that we distinguish colors when they fall on our photo receptors in our eyes and neurons pass its signals to our brain to recognise them as the specific colors. How accurate is it? For ...
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1answer
103 views

Sensory dissonance: Will the visual or auditory channel win?

Is there any research showing that our visual channel takes precedence over the auditory channel (or vice versa) if there is some dissonance between them? Examples: Say a person driving a car ...
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2answers
127 views

Why do one's surroundings still seem to rotate when you stop whirling around?

When you spin your head around in circles, the world appears to continue to spin. Why do one's surroundings still seem to rotate when you stop whirling around in a circle? What is happening in the ...
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42 views

What are the neurobiological mechanisms behind clumsiness

Some people are inherently clumsy (including your's truly). Everything from frequently stubbing their toes to, as in my case 2 days ago, falling down a single step and managing to crack a rib and ...
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2answers
93 views

What is the reward mechanism for eating spicy foods?

I can eat pure sugar and pure fats and find it pleasurable thanks to the taste receptors; and salt to a lesser extent. But pure raw chilli products trigger irritation to the tongue, cheeks and nasal ...
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3answers
360 views

Why is the sound of fingernails on a chalkboard so intolerable?

I am curious as to what current research shows regarding why scraping noises such as fingernails on a chalkboard, a knife/fork scraping against a plate, metal grinding against metal or stone etc are ...
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1answer
89 views

Does identifying a student's sensory learning style and exploiting it result in significantly better performance?

Do people tend to have one pronounced sense (i.e., there is high variability in how strong the auditory, visual, olfactory etc. perception is among people) and can this sense, once identified, be ...
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2answers
62 views

Eye movement tendencies for shades, sizes, shapes, and colours

I was asked this question yesterday Which of the following statements regarding research principles in visual attention is TRUE? The eyes tend to move from: a. Light to dark (shade) b. Large to ...
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0answers
200 views

How much information does the somatosensory system produce?

Are there any approximations of how many bits of information human somatosensory system produces? Especially mechano-receptors as measured in average number of bits per area of skin per second? I've ...
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35 views

What regulates the strength of motoric signals?

I've seen cognitive/roboter models where the input signals from the sensors are directly used as the signal for outgoing motoric control. This doesn't make much sense, because obviously we're able ...
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1answer
281 views

How do people visually recognize their own reflection?

I'm interested in how the brain processes and recognizes the image of the person's own face. A bit of background: A while ago I've developed an overlay-camera like app for iPhone that allows me to ...
12
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1answer
372 views

What stimulus features determine the psychophysical power law exponent?

Following the work of Stanley Stevens, psychophysical functions of stimulus intensity are commonly assumed to follow power laws, as illustrated below: This appears to be true for a wide variety of ...
6
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1answer
274 views

What is the brain power devoted to vision and haptics?

I heard a talk by Vincent Hayward on the sense of touch as a multi-modal system, where he claimed that the brain power devoted to haptics is at least as big as the one devoted to vision. I have found ...
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1answer
504 views

How do we get used to smells?

How do we get used to smells? For example, you walk into a room with a certain stench, but it seems no matter how strong it may be, spending enough time in the room will allow you to stop smelling ...
9
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1answer
209 views

Is there an effect of visual expertise on eye movements when examining an image?

In the following linked image, you can see the eye movement traces of a subject examining a bust of Nefertiti (I came across this image while reading the following blog). When I was in grade ...
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0answers
146 views

How many times can someone listen to a song before he/she stops enjoying it? [closed]

How many repetitions do we need to get tired of listening to a song over and over again? I want to know if some kind of average number of repetitions exisits. Is there any research related to this ...
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3answers
306 views

Is it possible for certain people to perceive colors differently?

What if someone perceives a color as 'red' when it is actually 'green'? Since different people have preferences for different colors, and colors are perhaps constructed in the mind, is it possible ...
7
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1answer
99 views

Under what circumstances does the brain devote resources to only the “when” of sensory events?

In a recent review article (Arnal & Giraud, 2012), the authors delve into changes in cortical oscillations which assist in predicting the causes of a sensory stimulus (the "what", via predictive ...
10
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1answer
270 views

Sensory Immersion Research?

Sensory deprivation is a relatively common technique for medititation and general consciousness-exploration. However, I'm more interested in sensory immersion. That is, deliberate overstimulation as ...
10
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2answers
370 views

What is the “static” in human vision called?

Sort of like a cheap digital Camera, the human eye has certain feedback that's perceived but doesn't actually exist in the real world; a little layer of Static that's especially noticeable in pitch ...
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1answer
296 views

Under what conditions does 60hz video produce visual artifacts?

There are some important thresholds of frame rate in video playback that effect whether or not animation appears fluid. This wikipedia page about Visible Frame Rate suggests that a framerate of 60 ...
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1answer
1k views

Is Apple's iPhone Retina Display really accurate to human eye resolution?

Apple based their Retina Display on the following claim, as cited by Wikipedia: The display has a contrast ratio of 800:1. The screen is marketed by Apple as the "Retina Display", based on the ...
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2answers
381 views

Do we understand the non-subjective mechanisms behind pleasure and pain?

If we are to view pleasure and pain as being essentially synonymous with the more mechanistic concept of reward and punishment (i.e. as a part of learning and motivation system) then do we understand ...
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504 views

What term describes people that cannot feel pain?

I remember a case study about a girl who could not feel pain due to lacking certain somatosensory receptors; she went on to burn herself on a radiator because she could not feel her flesh burning and ...
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3answers
264 views

Why does the human visual system produce a bright patch after staring at a bright light source and looking away?

If a person looks at a bright light source, such as a light bulb or perhaps the sun for a period of time, and then looks away and closes their eyes, they typically see a bright patch in the shape of ...