For questions regarding the organization and identification of transducted sensory information in the brain and its interpretation and consolidation in the mind

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Tactile perception of printed advertising materials and brand image

Does texture of paper (e.g.matt or glossy) of printed advertising materials affect the perception of brand image? From what I've researched so far ...
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2answers
1k views

What color is this dress? — And why do some see it as white and gold and others see it as black and blue?

Here's the dress (and keep reading, this is actually a serious question): This question about this image has apparently become quite a rapidly spreading meme on the internet. And after conducting ...
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5answers
576 views

Why do we prefer visually aligned objects?

We all know visual alignment is one of the foundations of design. Everything must be aligned with everything else. We also know that when things are aligned it is easier to process information. My ...
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1answer
239 views

Can stress or training influence the perception of time?

I have had this experience that I fell with my bike on an icy street. During the fall time seemed to slow down and I had an apparent age-long time window to stretch my hand and safely catch my fall. ...
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0answers
31 views

Curved/angled geometrical forms and association with femininity/ masculinity

Is there any research or theoretical reasoning on a strong inclination of human mind to associate curved forms with femininity and angled ones with masculinity? (A similar concept of association is ...
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2answers
134 views

Which are the multisensory brain areas?

What would be an example of a multisensory brain area, where multiple senses (e.g. smell and taste) are combined to decode the corresponding stimuli from more than one sensory organ? I was thinking ...
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1answer
172 views

Can prolonged neural adaptation lead to HPPD?

The human brain adapts to a constant stimulus of our neural system. For instance, if we ride a train and look out of the window for a long time and the train stops, we have the feeling of slowly ...
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2answers
556 views

What is the “static” in human vision called?

Sort of like a cheap digital Camera, the human eye has certain feedback that's perceived but doesn't actually exist in the real world; a little layer of Static that's especially noticeable in pitch ...
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2answers
83 views

How are humans able to read scrambled text/characters (e.g., CAPTCHA)?

So I'm doing a research on developing a new text-based CAPTCHA system. I've devised a scheme where characters in a text are broken/split individually and randomly, making it difficult for OCR machines ...
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2answers
72 views

Is there a way to compare the subjective experiences of two different subjects upon an object?

It is the major problem of all cognitive sciences to deal with subjectivity. On the other hand, in order to figure out what is cognition or psychology, one must ultimately deal with this problem. As a ...
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1answer
41 views

What is the phenomenon that one can recognize a movie after seeing a scene for a fraction of second called?

I have experiences that while I was walking around the street, I saw a scene on a TV for a fraction of second, and I instantly recognized the correspondent movie. This is very interesting since at the ...
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2answers
105 views

Acoustic and light wave coherency?

I know how some music notes combinations sound pleasing, yet others do not. Does the same occur with different frequencies of light (colors)? Since spectral color and acoustic pitch are both defined ...
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1answer
58 views

Rated model of driving-related processes and objects

The Salience, Effort, Effort and Value (SEEV) model for predicting the distribution of visual attention contains a parameter called 'value' which represents the importance of a certain area of the ...
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1answer
285 views

Binaural Beats meets Sound-Color-Synesthesia

Binaural beats, the perception of which arises in the brain for specific physical stimuli. ... The effect on the brainwaves depends on the difference in frequencies of each tone: for example, if ...
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2answers
137 views

Why can we not see around our point of focus of our eyes?

Why do we have to strictly focus on something to really see what it looks like? Is everything else around blurred, or is our brain trained only to see in the center of the image projected on the ...
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2answers
432 views

Is the theory of Information Metabolism a reasonable scientific theory?

Background I have been checking out various personality typing assessments lately when I came across a Personality typing system known as Socionics which aims at explaining relationships between ...
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0answers
42 views

Research on the van Norden percept

What are the latest research and explanations concerning this auditory effect? I haven't managed to turn up much on the net, so just to check that I've named it correctly, my experience of it was ...
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2answers
115 views

How does this illusion - that I just inadvertently created - work?

As I was working on a basic chess application for Android, I loaded some chess clip art into my imageviews. Then this happened. Look closely at the top two rows. At first I was startled. My ...
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1answer
67 views

What is an acquired taste?

Some foods are delicious. People love eating them, and the experience has a positive reinforcement. Thus, people will eat the food again. Some foods are instead "challenging", at least initially. For ...
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2answers
69 views

Why do those with viral infections feel better after wrongly taking antibiotics?

Though I'm unversed in science, I accept and understand that bacteria differ from viruses; so antibiotics don't help in viral infections. Regardless, because older family members still allege that ...
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0answers
68 views

Optical illusions : human universal vs environmental influences [closed]

It's well known today that the susceptibility to optical illusions are influenced by the environment: multiple studies with the Müller-Lyer illusion conducted in Zambia proved this environmental ...
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2answers
97 views

Is there a difference between hearing and decoding the sound?

I presume that deafness is the inability of hearing any sounds. And I presume that it's also possible to be less able to decode (and translate to a meaningful message) what others speak [happens a lot ...
6
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2answers
84 views

Long term effect of using noise generators

Some people use noise generators as http://playnoise.com/ to reduce distraction by background noise. Is there any research on the long term effects of this? Does this affect the neuronal connections ...
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1answer
105 views

How does the brain know whether or not it comprehends a novel concept?

There seem to be at least two kinds of confusion regarding novel concepts. In one, the brain simply can't form an abstract model from whatever information is being presented. It's where you can't ...
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24 views

Learning Reading without Speech?

I have this question from wandering how a person, who does not have speech capability or is isolated from people who speaks, could learn how to read? Will a language (A) like English or (B) like ...
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3answers
171 views

Why is sensory substitution not that successful

by successful I mean made it out to the large world market or being massively funded. After looking online it seems that the most relevant research is the one done by Bach-y-rita about the seeing with ...
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1answer
181 views
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1answer
147 views

Has there been any serious research on subliminal messaging?

I certainly don't question the existence of subliminal perception which has been demonstrated many times in priming studies like those of Daniel Schacter and many others, nor do I reject the notion of ...
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1answer
56 views

Is it conceivable to transmit all sound information in the tactile modality?

You may have heard of Evelyn Glennie, an acclaimed solo virtuoso percussionist. She has been profoundly deaf from the age of 12, but learned to differentiate pitch tactilely. She had absolute pitch, ...
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52 views

How do patients with Cotard's Syndrome rationalize environmental interactions?

A patient with Cotard's Syndrome (also called "Cotard delusion" and "Walking Corpse Syndrome") has the delusion that he or she is dead (and sometimes immortal), either figuratively or literally, yet ...
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1answer
526 views

Is there psychoactive music?

Listen to this music for X minutes to observe Y result. Is there something like that that has been demonstrated to work for general public? The only example of an experiment that is similar that ...
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1answer
81 views

Are some facial features more important than others in human facial recognition?

I'm often surprised by the human ability to correctly identify other individuals despite significant modifications due to ageing, hairstyle, injury etc. But, sometimes the addition of a beard and a ...
6
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1answer
209 views

Does your voice pitch affect your perceived authority?

I heard a claim that people with lower voice pitch are perceived as more credible than people with higher pitch. Is there any research on this?
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0answers
32 views

Where to find images of the same faces with and without glasses for experiment?

I am looking to replicate the findings of Leder, forster, and Gerger (2011) in their publication of the glasses stereotype revisited. I intend to examine the same conditions of no-glasses, rimmed ...
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0answers
13 views

sources on ethical replication of pain for testing effects on cognitive functions

I have devised a study that may provide an ethical way to invoke similar behaviours in participants, as those demonstrated by individuals in pain. Obviously it is extremely hard to correctly test ...
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2answers
117 views

Can one alter their auditory perception?

I'm coming from the idea that the way we perceive sound is a reaction to a certain signal, sent to our brain by ears. Of course this feeling intensifies as volume of the sound increases and our ears ...
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1answer
150 views

Are there any rules about masking?

I am currently programming an experiment where participants have to do a divided visual field task. In a paper about the correct methodology about these tasks, it is said that you should use a ...
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1answer
75 views

Effective sampling rate in human visual system

The [stroboscopic effect][1] is often explained as one of the problems of sampling. If sample rate is too low, you might have the impression of the signal frequency being low or even reverse. There ...
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0answers
61 views

The accuracy & malleability of memory for color

How accurate is colour memory for the standard person? It would seem most people are quite good at remembering the colour of objects by visualising the object. But in some cases peoples visualisation ...
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1answer
412 views

What is the relative importance of shape and color in object recognition?

Do people recognize objects faster when both shape and color are present? Can color introduce more cognitive load to identify the object? Let's say there is a row of icons. Users need to quickly (no ...
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1answer
80 views

How do certain frequencies of sound induce psychological states?

As one example, a specific low frequency beyond our hearing perception can make people feel nauseous and even vomit. I'm sure there are more documented studies surrounding the correlation of auditory ...
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1answer
68 views

What human limitations are there to object tracking and recognition?

I'm thinking about trying to implement object recognition/tracking using a silicon retina (also known as the Dynamic Vision Sensor) and using the Semantic Pointer Architecture as my cognitive model. ...
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0answers
33 views

Writing system, its future and social importance [closed]

I work on a rather specific subject, namely developement and inventing of writing systems (simply - alphabets). For some years it was just a hobby and creative exercise, but with time this hobby ...
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0answers
23 views

Why is sunrise therapeutic? [closed]

Despite being a night owl, I find when I'm up and about at sunrise1 I feel mentally much better than any other time of day - regardless of how much sleep I've had or whether I've been awake for many ...
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1answer
67 views

Experiencing neuronal activity inside the body/brain

Can one feel/experience "any" neuronal activity in oneself?
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1answer
133 views

Is there evidence for a unique isolated internal representation of loved ones?

Some time ago, I've read that the most significant people in a person's life have their own internal representation/model of within the person's mind. For example: An internal representation of a ...
4
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1answer
54 views

Is there a difference between the time/effort it takes for the blind and the sighted to learn to read Braille?

The visually deprived brain undergoes extensive remodeling due to cross-modal plasticity. This leads to increased areas of the cortex being available for other purposes such as tactile processing. Now ...
3
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1answer
103 views

Do unequal step sizes in staircase procedure affect the convergence?

Consider a psychophysics procedure using a standard staircase method to adaptively find the threshold, using a 2AFC paradigm and a 1-up, 3-down method to determine the 75% threshold. Now suppose the ...
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2answers
71 views

aftereffects of auditory adaptation

Adaptation is a very robust feature of sensory processing: when a stimulus is displayed for a prolonged period, or repeatedly, the neural response to it will diminish. This process creates a local ...
4
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1answer
71 views

How do people respond to auditory warning signals?

I am working on a literature review of total reaction time to an auditory alert, in a transport context. All of the literature I can find about perception-response times are in the context of visual ...