For questions regarding the organization and identification of transducted sensory information in the brain and its interpretation and consolidation in the mind

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3
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0answers
26 views

In psychophysics, why is log luminance rather than raw luminance values reported?

Are there any papers which justify converting into log luminance, in terms of, for example, humans being sensitive to changes in log luminance rather than luminance per se?
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0answers
11 views

Have there been tests used to measure one's perception of how creative something is?

I'm trying to think of ways to 'measure' creativity from an objective standpoint. One way that I can think of is to show multiple different 'creations' to observers and to ask them to rate the ...
2
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1answer
19 views

What is “perceptual competence”?

I have no idea what perceptual competence is? Does anyone know about it? I found no information about it on the web.
9
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2answers
164 views

Why can we not see around our point of focus of our eyes?

Why do we have to strictly focus on something to really see what it looks like? Is everything else around blurred, or is our brain trained only to see in the center of the image projected on the ...
6
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0answers
61 views

Is our attention attracted by bright lights?

Bright lights are often used to attract human attention. For example, brightly lit signs, despite often being too bright to look at directly are often used for information and/or advertisement. Why ...
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0answers
14 views

Why does video footage of walking look unnatural when viewed upside down? [closed]

I noticed this whilst lying on the floor to stretch my back and the TV happened to be on. People look like they're walking in a very unnatural way.
7
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1answer
74 views

Are the physical sensations of an emotion due to neural activity strictly in the brain or also in the body?

Symptoms of anxiety and anger are often described as some sort of energetic sensation in my chest and sometimes face or arms. Are these sensations an 'illusion' from neural activity strictly in the ...
5
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1answer
77 views

Is inhibitory brain circuitry involved in cross-modal sensory perception?

In many research articles, a vague description of a inhibitory circuitry in the brain is mentioned. This is presented as an inhibitory mechanism that prevents input from one sensory modality to excite ...
0
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2answers
70 views

What is the relationship between the ego, amygdala and consciousness? [closed]

I've been reading a lot about emotional responses lately, and the following points seem to surface in different writings: "Amygdala is a very ancient system, intended to quickly alert a person ...
7
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2answers
125 views

Is there a difference between hearing and decoding the sound?

I presume that deafness is the inability of hearing any sounds. And I presume that it may also be possible to be less able to decode sounds. In other words, an inability to translate or understand the ...
0
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1answer
44 views

Is there a disorder that causes one to give inanimate objects human emotions? [closed]

For example, if one is using multiple pens to write something and has not used one of them in awhile, one may think it is "feeling" "left out" and so will switch to use that one. A logical mind KNOWS ...
2
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1answer
36 views

Do users of pictographically represented languages users have the same rates of dyslexia and dysgraphia?

I was wondering, given that a number represents a concept, unlike a letter that represents sound (that changes with context) - Do pictographic language users have similar rates of dyslexia and ...
5
votes
1answer
76 views

Is it conceivable to transmit all sound information in the tactile modality?

You may have heard of Evelyn Glennie, an acclaimed solo virtuoso percussionist. She has been profoundly deaf from the age of 12, but learned to differentiate pitch tactilely. She had absolute pitch, ...
18
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2answers
690 views

How rare is synesthesia?

I visited a neuropsychologist recently who told me I have Synesthesia. I never really knew what it was, but it's fascinating and I can't believe it isn't the norm among people. For me, certain numbers ...
5
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4answers
339 views

Why does your recorded or objective voice sound different to what you hear in your own head?

When speaking, I hear my own voice very differently from how others do and from what it really is. The sound differs in tone, pitch, volume, etc. For example, recordings of my singing or speaking in ...
0
votes
1answer
32 views

How is it the case that it is easy to voluntarily trick our sense of sound, but not any of our other senses [closed]

Consider this, you are standing in line for groceries and you start thinking of your favorite song. As you are remembering the sounds that make up the song, you could say that you are hearing the ...
4
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0answers
34 views

Are there gender differences in the ability to identify shades of colors by name?

As many of you have, I have noticed that there appears to be a prevalent stereotype that girls seem to have "heightened" color perception. By this term, I mean that they can identify the salient ...
6
votes
1answer
125 views

How come we see a line when there isn't one in this picture?

I got this picture I generated myself and I don't understand how come we can see two diagonal lines when, I think, there is no actual lines. Zooming in: Center: Just another 2px wide square… ...
3
votes
1answer
97 views

How can pain sensations appear to originate within the person's skull?

I've read that humans have some sort of a kinesthetic model of their body and muscles. This internal representation of the body is used to control and coordinate locomotion. I don't remember if ...
2
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0answers
8 views

Is perceived time compressed or expanded while dreaming? (or does it match reality) [duplicate]

I often dream long extended dreams. Sometimes I wonder if the timeline of the story of my dream occurs compressed, in a moment, or other times extended slowly over a long duration. Is there any way ...
4
votes
1answer
62 views

Has the inverted spectrum thought experiment ever been conducted (and if not, why)?

The inverted spectrum thought experiment posits that you (the subject) wake up one morning to find that your colour spectrum (or some part of it anyway) has inverted. This experiment has important ...
1
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0answers
24 views

Is continuous split or meta - awareness a scientifically supported concept?

There are a number of spiritual practices that practice self-awareness and continuous awareness of one's thoughts and actions (for example the teachings of Ekhart Tolle): Tolle writes that "the ...
5
votes
1answer
59 views

What is the neurophysiological mechanism behind double hearing?

A patient with sensorineural hearing loss can have the symptom of hearing "double" in the damaged ear. Not having a time-delayed echo, but hearing as if he (or other people) speak with "two voices" at ...
4
votes
1answer
61 views

What are the main theories that account for why some people like X and others not? [closed]

For example, how does psychology account for why some people like peanuts and others hate them? This is a serious question, although perhaps naive. Sure, there can be some physiological explanations ...
3
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0answers
32 views

Do people perceive opacity of a color linearly?

I am trying to create a visualization for some numbers, each ranging from 0 to 1. I was thinking of representing each number by a color (say red) of a certain opacity corresponding to its value. For ...
5
votes
2answers
94 views

How to test whether a person is Left-Eared or Right-Eared?

It is well-known that the majority of humans have left-right preferences when using their hands or feet. But it is perhaps less well-known that the same can be true for our eyes and ears. I once ...
3
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0answers
38 views

Why do I see those static pictures as they are moving [duplicate]

Have a look at the following static pictures: There are more of them here. On the same website this PDF describes findings.However I could not find any explanation why this phenomenon happening. ...
6
votes
1answer
119 views

Does our brain react as if we were physically hurt when we are lied to?

I think I've read somewhere that our brain acts as if we were physically hurt (as if we feel pain) when we catch someone lying to us. I couldn't find anything about it on google, and my memory is not ...
2
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0answers
21 views

Tactile perception of printed advertising materials and brand image

Does texture of paper (e.g.matt or glossy) of printed advertising materials affect the perception of brand image? From what I've researched so far ...
21
votes
2answers
1k views

What color is this dress? — And why do some see it as white and gold and others see it as black and blue?

Here's the dress (and keep reading, this is actually a serious question): This question about this image has apparently become quite a rapidly spreading meme on the internet. And after conducting ...
20
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5answers
602 views

Why do we prefer visually aligned objects?

We all know visual alignment is one of the foundations of design. Everything must be aligned with everything else. We also know that when things are aligned it is easier to process information. My ...
8
votes
1answer
272 views

Can stress or training influence the perception of time?

I have had this experience that I fell with my bike on an icy street. During the fall time seemed to slow down and I had an apparent age-long time window to stretch my hand and safely catch my fall. ...
5
votes
0answers
33 views

Curved/angled geometrical forms and association with femininity/ masculinity

Is there any research or theoretical reasoning on a strong inclination of human mind to associate curved forms with femininity and angled ones with masculinity? (A similar concept of association is ...
11
votes
2answers
147 views

Which are the multisensory brain areas?

What would be an example of a multisensory brain area, where multiple senses (e.g. smell and taste) are combined to decode the corresponding stimuli from more than one sensory organ? I was thinking ...
6
votes
1answer
185 views

Can prolonged neural adaptation lead to HPPD?

The human brain adapts to a constant stimulus of our neural system. For instance, if we ride a train and look out of the window for a long time and the train stops, we have the feeling of slowly ...
11
votes
2answers
648 views

What is the “static” in human vision called?

Sort of like a cheap digital Camera, the human eye has certain feedback that's perceived but doesn't actually exist in the real world; a little layer of Static that's especially noticeable in pitch ...
5
votes
2answers
127 views

How are humans able to read scrambled text/characters (e.g., CAPTCHA)?

So I'm doing a research on developing a new text-based CAPTCHA system. I've devised a scheme where characters in a text are broken/split individually and randomly, making it difficult for OCR machines ...
4
votes
2answers
81 views

Is there a way to compare the subjective experiences of two different subjects upon an object?

It is the major problem of all cognitive sciences to deal with subjectivity. On the other hand, in order to figure out what is cognition or psychology, one must ultimately deal with this problem. As a ...
3
votes
1answer
45 views

What is the phenomenon that one can recognize a movie after seeing a scene for a fraction of second called?

I have experiences that while I was walking around the street, I saw a scene on a TV for a fraction of second, and I instantly recognized the correspondent movie. This is very interesting since at the ...
2
votes
2answers
112 views

Acoustic and light wave coherency?

I know how some music notes combinations sound pleasing, yet others do not. Does the same occur with different frequencies of light (colors)? Since spectral color and acoustic pitch are both defined ...
8
votes
1answer
58 views

Rated model of driving-related processes and objects

The Salience, Effort, Effort and Value (SEEV) model for predicting the distribution of visual attention contains a parameter called 'value' which represents the importance of a certain area of the ...
6
votes
1answer
301 views

Binaural Beats meets Sound-Color-Synesthesia

Binaural beats, the perception of which arises in the brain for specific physical stimuli. ... The effect on the brainwaves depends on the difference in frequencies of each tone: for example, if ...
12
votes
2answers
484 views

Is the theory of Information Metabolism a reasonable scientific theory?

Background I have been checking out various personality typing assessments lately when I came across a Personality typing system known as Socionics which aims at explaining relationships between ...
1
vote
0answers
47 views

Research on the van Norden percept

What are the latest research and explanations concerning this auditory effect? I haven't managed to turn up much on the net, so just to check that I've named it correctly, my experience of it was ...
8
votes
2answers
128 views

How does this illusion - that I just inadvertently created - work?

As I was working on a basic chess application for Android, I loaded some chess clip art into my imageviews. Then this happened. Look closely at the top two rows. At first I was startled. My ...
5
votes
1answer
70 views

What is an acquired taste?

Some foods are delicious. People love eating them, and the experience has a positive reinforcement. Thus, people will eat the food again. Some foods are instead "challenging", at least initially. For ...
4
votes
2answers
75 views

Why do those with viral infections feel better after wrongly taking antibiotics?

Though I'm unversed in science, I accept and understand that bacteria differ from viruses; so antibiotics don't help in viral infections. Regardless, because older family members still allege that ...
3
votes
0answers
71 views

Optical illusions : human universal vs environmental influences [closed]

It's well known today that the susceptibility to optical illusions are influenced by the environment: multiple studies with the Müller-Lyer illusion conducted in Zambia proved this environmental ...
8
votes
2answers
125 views

Long term effect of using noise generators

Some people use noise generators as http://playnoise.com/ to reduce distraction by background noise. Is there any research on the long term effects of this? Does this affect the neuronal connections ...
3
votes
1answer
109 views

How does the brain know whether or not it comprehends a novel concept?

There seem to be at least two kinds of confusion regarding novel concepts. In one, the brain simply can't form an abstract model from whatever information is being presented. It's where you can't ...